Connect with us

Featured

GDPR to affect Europe and South African companies

ROB LITH, Director: Business Development at Connection Telecom , explores the implementation of GDPR and its potential impact on local businesses.

Published

on

As of 25 May, anyone trading with EU businesses, marketing to EU citizens, or holding the personal data of even a single European national, needs to be fully compliant. This means making major changes to how one captures, processes and stores consumer data, with a strong focus on data protection and archiving practices. Ignore GDPR, and you run the risk of hefty fines (up to €20 million or 4% of annual global turnover, whichever is greater), a loss of consumer trust, and untold damage to your reputation. Are you ready to face GDPR head-on? If you have been readying yourself for compliance to our own POPI (Protection of Personal Information) act, then you should not be far off complying with GDPR which is based on similar principles.

The requirements of GDPR

Globally, recent years have seen some of the worst data leaks and malicious hacks in history. As a result, people are far more concerned about their fundamental right to privacy and have also become more vigilant and aware of their liberties when it comes to their digitally-gathered personal data, and what businesses are doing with it. GDPR outlines a new set of regulations that are designed to prioritise the rights of EU citizens and give them more control over their private data, including valuable and sensitive information such as financial details, phone numbers, addresses, religious and political views, and much more. 

Regardless of where a business is located, if it collects or processes the personal information of any EU resident, GDPR applies. In this regard, it’s imperative to understand what data you collect, where it is stored and how it’s being used. The legislation highlights two main data rights for customers: the right to be forgotten, where a customer can request their data be deleted; and the right for data portability, where a customer can request that their data is moved from one company to another. Customers are further protected in the form of necessary updated privacy notices, which need to be worded in clear, concise and plain language that anyone can understand. By outlining exactly what you’ll be doing with the data, a strong focus on transparency is emphasised, and customers feel more at ease. 

Another important aspect of the regulation involves data breaches. Businesses are required to notify authorities of any kind of cybercrime within 72 hours. In an effort to minimise exposure to these kinds of attacks, a company is encouraged to only collect, share and keep the data that they really need, and to ensure that it is effectively searchable in case they are called upon to provide it. 

The importance of change and compliance  

Any South African company needing to align itself with the GDPR requires the appropriate internal processes and technical capabilities to be able to execute these changes correctly. For example, a data processing company, such as Connection Telecom, would need to sharpen its security controls and data breach continuity plans, and seek advice from a specialist attorney that can assist with updating its policies and documentation to ensure informed consent and water-tight compliance. 

The relationship and transfer of data between data controllers and data processors is an important part of GDPR, and businesses need to work together to ensure consumer information is secure. Companies should also consider assigning dedicated individuals or teams to focus on GDPR, to ensure that data is accurately documented, safely stored, and permanently deleted – not to mention that practices are regularly tested to ensure optimal protection. 

Beyond the negative financial implications of non-compliance, there’s another important reason for businesses to implement these data security and integrity practices: a digitally-savvy generation of customers is better informed than ever before, and the reputational risks associated with irresponsible handling of data are known all too well. Consumers expect ethical behaviour and utter transparency, even from the largest corporation. 

Finally, it is worth noting the positives of GDPR compliance. By gaining a true understanding of a business’s data practices, more effective business decisions can be made in the long run. It’s not just a legal responsibility, it’s an opportunity to do better business – and organisations across the globe would do well to embrace it with open arms. 

Featured

News fatigue shifts Google searches in SA

Google search trends in South Africa reveal a startling insight into news appetite, writes BRYAN TURNER.

Published

on

The big searches of the year no longer track the biggest news stories of the year, suggesting a strong dose of news fatigue among South Africans.

“People ask, why are the Guptas not on the list of Google’s top searches?, says Mich Atagana, head of communications and public affairs at Google South Africa, “The Guptas are not on the list because South Africans are not actually that interested. South Africans are looking for things they don’t know. From a Gupta point of view, we’ve been exhausted by the news and we know exactly what is going on.”

Google South Africa announced the results of its 2018 Year in Search, offering a unique perspective on the year’s major moments.

“Four years ago, there were almost no South Africans on the personalities list,” says Atagana. “Over the years, South Africans have gotten more interested in South Africa, in searching on Google.”

That isn’t to say that international searches – like Meghan Markle – are not heavily searched by South Africans. But  they feature lower down on the lists.

From the World Cup to listeriosis, Zuma and Global Citizen, South Africans use search to find the things they really need to know.

These are the main trends revealed  by Google this week:

Top trending South African searches

  1. World Cup fixtures
  2. Load shedding
  3. Global Citizen
  4. Zuma
  5. Winnie Mandela
  6. HHP
  7. Listeriosis
  8. Black Panther
  9. Meghan Markle
  10. Mac Miller

Trending personalities

  1.    Jacob Zuma
  2. Cyril Ramaphosa
  3. Sbahle Mpisane
  4. Kevin Anderson
  5. Malusi Gigaba
  6. Ashwin Willemse
  7. Patrice Motsepe
  8. Cheryl Zondi
  9. Shamila Batohi
  10. Mlindo the Vocalist

Top Questions

  1. How did Avicii die?
  2. How old is Pharrell Williams?
  3. What is listeriosis?
  4. What is black data?
  5. How old is Prince Harry?
  6. How much are Global Citizen tickets?
  7. How to get pregnant?
  8. What time is the royal wedding?
  9. What happened to HHP?
  10. How old is Meghan Markle?

Top ‘near me’ searches

  1. Jobs near me
  2. Nandos near me
  3. Dischem near me
  4. McDonalds near me
  5. Guest house near me
  6. Postnet near me
  7. Steers near me
  8. Spar near me
  9. Debonairs near me
  10. Spur near me

Top women

  1. Winnie Mandela
  2. Meghan Markle
  3. Sbahle Mpisane
  4. Aretha Franklin
  5. Khloe Kardashian
  6. Sophie Ndaba
  7. Cheryl Zondi
  8. Demi Lovato
  9. Lerato Sengadi
  10. Siam Lee

The Year In Search 2018 minisite can be found here.

Continue Reading

Featured

Smartphones dip in 2018

According to the International Data Corporation (IDC) Worldwide Quarterly Mobile Phone Tracker, worldwide smartphone shipments are expected to decline by 3% in 2018 before returning to low single-digit growth in 2019 and through 2022.

Published

on

While the on-going U.S.-China trade war has the industry on edge, IDC still believes that continued developments from emerging markets, mixed with potential around 5G and new product form factors, will bring the smartphone market back to positive growth.

Smartphone shipments are expected to drop to 1.42 billion units in 2018, down from 1.47 billion in 2017. However, IDC expects year-over-year shipment growth of 2.6% in 2019. Over the long-term, smartphone shipments are forecast to reach 1.57 billion units in 2022. From a geographic perspective, the China market, which represented 30% of total smartphone shipments in 2017, is finally showing signs of recovery. While the world’s largest market is still forecast to be down 8.8% in 2018 (worse than the 2017 downturn), IDC anticipates a flat 2019, then back to positive territory through 2022. The U.S. is also forecast to return to positive growth in 2019 (up 2.1% year over year) after experiencing a decline in 2018.

The slow revival of China was one of the reasons for low growth in Q3 2018 and this slowdown will persist into Q1 2019 as the market is expected to drop by 3% in Q4 2018. Furthermore, the recently lifted U.S. ban on ZTE had an impact on shipments in Q3 2018 and created a sizable gap that is yet to be filled heading into 2019.

“With many of the large global companies focusing on high-end product launches, hoping to draw in consumers looking to upgrade based on specifications and premium devices, we can expect head-to-head competition within this segment during the holiday quarter and into 2019 to be exceptionally high,” said Sangeetika Srivastava, senior research analyst with IDC’s Worldwide Mobile Device Trackers.

Though 2018 has fallen below expectations so far, the worldwide smartphone market is set to pick up on the shift toward larger screens and ultra-high-end devices. All the big players have further built out their portfolios with bigger screens and higher-end smartphones, including Apple’s new launch in September. In Q3 2018, the 6-inch to less than 7-inch screen size band became the most prominent band for the first time with more than four times year-over-year growth. IDC believes that larger-screen smartphones (5.5 inches and above) will lead the charge with volumes of 947.1 million in 2018, accounting for 66.7% of all smartphones, up from 623.3 million units and 42.5% share in 2017. By 2022, shipments of these larger-screen smartphones will move up to 1.38 billion units or 87.7% of overall shipment volume.

“What we consider a so-called normal size smartphone has shifted dramatically in a few short years and while we are stretching the limits with bezel-less devices, the next big switch to flexible screens will test our imaginations even further,” said Melissa Chau, associate research director with IDC’s Worldwide Mobile Device Trackers. “While this category of device is still nascent and won’t see major adoption in the year ahead, it’s exciting to see changes to the standard monoblock we are all so used to carrying.”

Platform Highlights

Android: Android’s smartphone share will remain stable at 85% throughout the forecast. Volumes are expected to grow at a five-year compound annual growth rate (CAGR) of 1.7% with shipments approaching 1.36 billion in 2022. Android is still the choice of the masses with no shift expected. Android average selling prices (ASPs) are estimated to grow by 9.6% in 2018 to US$258, up from US$235 in 2017. IDC expects this upward trajectory to continue through the forecast, but at a softened rate from 2019 and beyond. Not only are market players pushing upgraded specs and materials to offset decreasing replacement rates, but they are also serving the evolving consumer needs for better performance.

iOS: iOS smartphones are forecast to drop by 2.5% in 2018 to 210.4 million. The launch of expensive and bigger screen iOS smartphones in Q3 2018 helped Apple to raise its ASP, simultaneously making it somewhat difficult to increase shipments in the current market slump. IDC is forecasting iPhone shipments to grow at a five-year CAGR of 0.1%, reaching volumes of 217.3 million in 2022. Despite the challenges, there is no ambiguity that Apple will continue to lead the global premium market segment.

Continue Reading

Trending

Copyright © 2018 World Wide Worx