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Why data power must shift

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Information is one of the most valuable commodities today and in order for businesses to ensure their livelihood, it is vital for them to move from static to dynamic automated and reliable data storage models, says MARK TAYLOR, CEO of Nashua.

Information is one of the most valuable commodities. Every day, 2.5 quintillion bytes of data is created and either has a direct monetary value or can be mined for business intelligence to get a competitive edge. Data is the lifeblood of any organisation. Without the Internet and connectivity, business survival and economic growth is impossible.

The original intent of the Internet was the unrestricted flow of information in an open and shared network owned by the community. Data ownership was intended to reside with its creators in a decentralised model, free from monopolistic or centralised control.

However, large corporations quickly realised the value of tracking, storing, organising and monetising information for use in centralised services. Although not owned by a single entity, large corporations and data giants like Google support some of the most critical components of the Internet, such as search engines, web hosting, cloud computing and email services.

The case for decentralisation

As the reliance on the Internet deepens, so does the sharing of sensitive data and the need for greater privacy, data security and integrity. One proposed solution is a fully decentralised Internet independent of centralised control. This can be achieved with Blockchain technology – a decentralised and distributed ledger system that facilitates and verifies secure peer-to-peer data exchanges.

The biggest issues facing the Internet, such as net neutrality, privacy and security, pertain to issues of structure. Under a centralised model, access and convenience is offered to users at the expense of data ownership and privacy. While many service providers offer to store and safeguard data, security can’t be guaranteed. Servers can fail, networks can be hacked and privacy rights can be violated.

Decentralisation enables data and vital services to be owned by users and powered by a network of independent computers. This creates a setting much more resilient to hacks and failures as encrypted data can only be released and accessed through private keys. Decentralisation also breaks down the centralised barriers to business. With reliable high-speed Internet connectivity from Nashua, any business can access better, faster and cheaper services.

Here’s how decentralised models can revolutionise the Internet and cybersecurity.

Decentralised web

A truly decentralised Internet is possible with Blockchain technology. Ethereum is a platform on which apps can be built and run without fraud, censorship or third-party interference. User information is encrypted and stored on the Blockchain which prevents service providers from hoarding and mining user data.

Decentralised web hosting

With only one target to hit, cybercriminals can quite easily shut down a website hosted on a centralised system. On Blockchain-based platforms, thousands of nodes or computers are employed to each serve a part of the website. This makes targeted attacks much harder and reduces hosting costs. It speeds up user access to websites by bringing cached content closer to site visitors. Self-executing smart contracts can also be used to manage resources and payments while users also have the opportunity to rent out idle network and computing resources.

Decentralised data storage

Blockchain enables users to use applications while retaining ownership of their data. By storing data on a decentralised and distributed network, the data is broken up, encrypted and stored across the Blockchain network. To access information, users need a private key to download the data from several locations at once. This not only speeds up the file access speeds but makes it increasingly difficult for cybercriminals to gain access.

Decentralised search engines

Google controls up to 95% of searches. The engine tracks search activities and has access to personal user information. Decentralised search engines store encrypted user data across a network as opposed to in a central location where it remains vulnerable. They also use open and transparent search ranking factors. This will level the playing field for businesses and content creators.

Decentralised social media

Social media platforms add significant connectivity value but at the cost of user privacy and data ownership. Decentralised social media channels will give back to users the ownership of data and reward users who choose to share information.

The full potential of a distributed economy is still unwritten but innovative solutions by emerging Blockchain innovators have already proven that the sky is the limit.

Featured

Win a Poster Heater with Gadget and Takealot.com

This winter Gadget and Takealot.com are giving away three Poster Heaters, which look like posters but become heaters when you plug them in.

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Three Gadget readers will each win a unit, valued at R550 each. To enter, follow @GadgetZA and @Takealot on Twitter and tell us on the @GadgetZA account how many Watts the heater consumes.

What’s the big deal about these heaters? Many of us are struggling to keep the balance between soaring electricity costs and the need to keep warm this winter.

However, the recently launched Poster Heater by EasyHeat and distributed in South Africa by Takealot.com is not only one of the most cost effective electric heaters currently on the market, it is also easy to setup and use.

As the name indicates, it is a poster similar to one you would hang on a wall. But, plug it in and it turns into a 300 Watt heater. The Poster Heater isn’t designed to heat hallways or large rooms, but rather smaller ones like a bedroom or a baby’s nursery or a dressing room.

It uses radiant heating, which means that it heats up in a couple of minutes and the heat is directed at the objects or people around it, quickly taking the chill out of the air and providing a comfortable ambient temperature.

The other advantage of radiant heating is that it doesn’t dry out the air like infrared or gas heaters. Users also don’t have to worry about their children or pets getting too close to it because, even though it gets hot, it can be touched.

To enter the competition follow the steps below:

Competition entry details:

1. Follow @GadgetZA and @Takealot on Twitter. (We will ONLY be accepting entires via Twitter, so please don’t enter through the comments section of this article.)

2. Tell us on Twitter, via @GadgetZA, mentioning @Takealot in your posting, how many Watts the Poster Heater consumes.

cleardot.gif3. The competition closes on 31 July 2018.

4. Winners will be notified via Twitter on 1 August and Takealot.com will be in touch to organise delivery.

5. The competition is only open to South African residents.

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Arts and Entertainment

Deezer to host Hotstix’s Mandela tribute playlist

Deezer is celebrating Nelson Mandela on the centenary of his birthday by hosting a tribute playlist created by music legend Sipho “Hotstix” Mabuse.  

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Mabuse, a legendary figure in African music, first rose to prominence in the 1970s with his band Harari and later developed a name for himself as a solo artist. One of his best known songs was the global hit BurnOut in the 1980s.

The playlist takes the listener on a captivating musical journey through the life of Nelson Mandela.  It was compiled by Mabuse, who consulted with Mandela’s family and friends to ensure that the music would be relevant and accurate. The playlist also features commentary by Mabuse, which was recorded in his Soweto home.  

“I have tried to tell the story of the music that Madiba loved,” says Mabuse. “The Playlist excludes the time in prison obviously, as Madiba would not have had exposure to music in that time.  We have focused on the music we know he loved before and after that period. This recording was really an emotional journey for me, but an incredible opportunity to document these memories.”

The playlist features the music the young Mandela loved, such as The Manhattan Brothers, Solomon Linda, Brenda Fassie and Miriam Makeba.  It includes struggle songs from Chicco, Johnny Clegg, Hugh Masekela and Yvonne Chaka Chaka.  The playlist also includes Mandela by Zahara, one of the younger artists who caught Madiba’s ear.

Mabuse also offers stories of his own songs, such as Shikisha, a song greatly beloved by the former President.

“I was delighted to share my thoughts and hope the listeners enjoyed the musical journey,” says Mabuse. “Madiba did enjoy music immensely and we all have a purpose wherever we are in the world to celebrate culture and to learn from different cultures and music forms and styles.”

This playlist was inspired by the Nelson Mandela 100 campaign, calling on corporates and individuals to act as sources of inspiration and engage in conversation and action.

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