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Telcos must adapt – fast

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No industry will remain undisrupted in 2018 and the years to come. But for African telco providers, who have feasted on near-uninterrupted subscriber and revenue growth over the past two decades, the need to adapt is paramount, writes MARIAM ABDULLAHI, Telco Industry Lead at SAP Africa.

In a market where the average business lifespan is 12 years (compared to 25 years in the last two decades) the objective is not to simply improve that which is already working. African telcos need radical transformation of entire business models in order to become digital supply networks and re-imagine work, resources management, and contingent worker management.

Since the advent of the Internet and the more recent emergence of technologies that include machine learning, IoT, cloud computing, and predictive analytics, businesses with exponential growth models such as Amazon, Uber, Airbnb and MPESA have entirely transformed their industry sectors almost overnight.

Thanks at least in part to these companies, customer expectations have ballooned, with modern consumers demanding personalised, efficient service at low cost and with added convenience. Talented employees have also increasingly gravitated toward these companies, putting further pressure on incumbents who suddenly are outperformed and out-innovated at every turn. “Too big to fail” in today’s market is a near-certain recipe for decline and eventual disaster.

Telco execs heeding the call

Telco executives across Africa and other emerging markets have scrambled to reinvent their business models in the face of shifting customer demands and the arrival of agile, customer-centric competitors. Airtel Africa merged its Ghana operations with Tigo Ghana and sold off operations in Sierra Leone and Burkina Faso to adapt to rapidly changing market conditions. South Africa’s Cell-C is seeking investments into fibre-to-the-home providers to enable its diversification into new service offerings including insurance and media.

Further afield in India, LTE and Voice-over-LTE operator Jio acquired 100 million subscribers in only six months by offering free voice services for life to its customers, prompting a sudden merger between Vodafone India and Aditya Birla Group’s Idea operations to form India’s largest telecoms company.

Kenya’s Safaricom is building on its much-lauded MPESA platform by diversifying into new revenue streams, including Uber competitor Little and e-commerce portal Ma Soko to claim a greater share of its customers’ wallets.

These companies have already felt the effects of declining traditional revenue streams as disruption from the likes of OTT players such as WhatsApp, Skype and YouTube put pressure on what was until recently primary (and highly dependable) sources of revenue. According to PwC, many telco operators globally are seeing revenue drop-offs of as much as 30% in SMS, 20% in international voice, and 15% in international roaming. Incremental improvements and operational changes are no longer enough. Those that can adapt to take advantage of technology megatrends such as hyper connectivity, cloud computing, and IoT are far better placed to reinvent their business models and can further incorporate Software Defined Networks and Network Function Virtualisation to speed up the innovation cycle.

The nature of transformation in 2018

Digital transformation in 2018 is not about cutting costs or optimising existing processes. It is a relook of the entire telco business model. It is asking the hard questions: Am I serving my customers in the right way? Are my operations efficient? Is cost-cutting adequate and sustainable? Am I able to hire the correct staff, attract the best talent, and empower them to contribute to an inclusive and innovation-focused workplace?

Telco executives must ensure their companies’ day-to-day culture drives innovation across the entire business. The aim should be on developing personalised services and to deliver such services in a way to meets the demands of an empowered customer base. The only way to do that is to have access to the correct customer insights – such as data usage and consumption habits, call volumes, area of residence – and to act on such insights in a humane and personalised manner. For this, analytics and data are key, especially when matched to an in-memory computing platform that enables real-time actionable insights.

At a time when telco offerings are highly commoditised and there’s not too much distinguishing one operator from the other, telcos need to simplify their core business operations to allow for the development of a clear unique value proposition for sustainable growth that takes local conditions into account. For example, with so many African countries not yet fully adopting 4G technology, does it truly make sense to invest heavily in emerging 5G technology?

The African telco market has moved away from improvement to large-scale disruption and transformation. Telcos who embark on a process of total business model change underpinned by powerful exponential technologies will be far better placed to withstand and overcome the challenge posed by the new breed of disruptors.

2018 will determine who adapts, maximises on operational efficiencies, leverages innovation for new revenue streams and who relies on old ways of doing businesses that negatively impacts their Go To Market offerings.

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Huawei Mate 20 Pro matches camera benchmark record

A benchmark by DxOMark sees the triple-cam handset tie with the P20 Pro for best smartphone camera on the market.

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The Huawei Mate 20 Pro has come out top in a camera benchmark test that assesses all aspects of smartphone camera performance.

DxOMark, which conducts rigorous hardware testing and is trusted as an industry standard for image quality measurements, has just released the results of its in-depth analysis of the Huawei Mate 20 Pro smartphone camera. 

The Huawei Mate 20 Pro is the Chinese manufacturer’s latest top-end device. Building on the P20 Pro’s camera technology, the Mate 20 Pro comes with a Leica-branded triple-camera setup, but swaps its stable-mate’s monochrome camera for a super-wide-angle module, offering a 35mm-equivalent focal length range from 16 to 80mm—the widest of all current smartphone cameras.

The handset is in direct competition with the Apple iPhone XS Max, the Google Pixel 3 XL, the Samsung Galaxy Note 9, among other. How does it fare?

“With a total photo score of 114, the Huawei Mate 20 Pro ties the record-setting score of its cousin, the P20 Pro,” says DxOMark. “The overall Photo score is calculated from sub-scores in tests that examine different aspects of its performance under different lighting conditions.”

The Huawei Mate 20 Pro achieves a photo score of 114 points. In stills mode, the Mate 20 Pro’s triple camera captures images with good target exposure and a wide dynamic range, recording both good highlight and shadow detail even in difficult high-contrast situations. Noise levels are well under control down to low light levels, and the camera’s white balance system and colour rendering settings produce a pleasant colour response in almost all circumstances.

At 97 points, the Mate 20 Pro is very close to the best for video as well, thanks to a fast and smooth autofocus system with good tracking performance, accurate white balance as well as pleasant colour rendering, and low levels of noise, especially in bright shooting conditions. Our testers also liked the exposure system’s ability to adapt quickly and smoothly to changes in illumination.

It was not all good news. DxOMark also had some criticism for the device.

Click here to read about the drawbacks of the Mate 20 Pro camera, and other positives.

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SA car wins
Dakar Rally

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The final stage of Dakar 2019 drew to a close at the bivouac in Pisco, Peru, and saw Toyota Gazoo Racing South Africa’s Nasser Al Attiyah and Mathieu Baumel bring home their South African-built Toyota Hilux for an historic victory. Not only was it a first win for Toyota, but it was also the first petrol-powered car to win the Dakar in the South-American era.

The Qatari driver ensured his French navigator, who turned 43 years old on Thursday, 17 January, received a great birthday present, when the pair arrived at the final time control of Dakar 2019 with teammates Giniel de Villiers and Dirk von Zitzewitz in close formation. The two Toyota Hilux crews completed the entire stage together, as De Villiers / Von Zitzewitz waited nearly 55 minutes for the leaders to start the stage, in order to shadow them to the finish.

The emotions bubbled over for Team Principal Glyn Hall, who found himself without words as his two crews drove into the media area after the time control. “This victory was long overdue,” he finally managed, before being swamped in a sea of well-wishers.

The winning driver, however, was much more vocal: “We are so happy to win the Dakar – not only for ourselves, but also for Toyota and the entire Toyota Gazoo Racing SA team. Everyone has worked so hard for so long, and really deserve this. Thank you for letting us drive this car.”

Toyota Gazoo Racing SA led Dakar 2019 from the first to the last stage, with Al Attiyah/Baumel drawing first blood, before handing the mantle to De Villiers / Von Zitzewitz during stage 2. But then a disastrous Stage 3 saw the Qatari retake the lead – a lead he didn’t relinquish despite some of the toughest stages yet seen on any South-American Dakar.

“When we first heard that the rally was going to take place only in one country, we were skeptical,” said Hall after regaining composure. “But the organisers made sure that this year’s race will long be remembered as one of the toughest tests in the last decade.”

Al Attiyah / Baumel’s victory at Dakar 2019 means that Toyota Gazoo Racing has now won both of the world’s toughest automotive races – the 24 Hours of Le Mans, and the DakarRally.

Click here to read Glyn Hall’s comment on winning the Dakar Rally, as well as the rankings.

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