Connect with us

Featured

As smart as it gets

Published

on

A string of new phone releases reveal the state of the smart art, writes ARTHUR GOLDSTUCK in the second of a two-part series. This week, Huawei, Samsung and Apple in focus.

There was a time when only two smartphone brands could get the world to sit up and take notice when they released new handsets. Now they’ve been joined by a third. Apple and Samsung will have to bunch up their seats at the top table to make space for Huawei.

The latest handset from the Chinese phone maker is one of the most advanced devices ever put in the hands of ordinary consumers. But then, it has to be if Huawei wants to compete with Apple and Samsung, which each recently released their own contenders for that accolade.

Here is a look at where each of the phones claim maximum points:

Huawei Mate 10 Pro

huawei-lead-800x420

Phones can’t think yet, but Huawei hopes to change that.

Its secret weapon is the Kirin 970 chipset, a processor designed to augment the smarts of both the phone and its user.  While we often associate artificial intelligence (AI) with machines that think for themselves and function independently of human beings, the Mate 10 points us in a more practical – and useful – direction for the algorithms that power AI.

For example, intelligent photographic algorithms identify different scenes and objects while the user is focusing, and automatically adjusts colour, contrast, brightness and exposure. That means, when one focuses on food or beach scenes, the lighting is automatically adjusted to what suits that kind of scene best.

On a business level, the phone takes the standard contacts list to a new level. It connects the address book on the phone to the user’s LinkedIn account, so that profile information on LinkedIn contacts are directly integrated into the phone’s contact list. This combines callers’ contact details with their professional identity, giving the phone user instant access to useful information on the person calling or being called.

“As we enter the age of intelligence, AI is no longer a virtual concept but something that intertwines with our daily life,” said Likun Zhao, general manager of Huawei Consumer Business Group SA, at the recent launch of the phone. “AI can enhance user experience, provide valuable services and improve product performance. The Huawei Mate 10 Series introduces the first mobile AI-specific Neural Network Processing Unit (NPU).”

The Microsoft Translator app has been customised for the Huawei Mate 10 series to provide the handset with the world’s first fully neural, on-device translations.

A company statement says: “The phone’s NPU allows every Mate 10 user to have native access to online quality level translations, even when they are not connected to the Internet, which means faster and more accurate interactive translation for a smoother communication experience.”

The Kirin 970 is claimed to deliver 25 times better performance and 50 times greater energy efficiency for AI-related tasks, compared to typical quad core chips. Once mobile networks integrate new connectivity technologies, the Mate 10 will also be ready: Huawei says it is “the world’s fastest smartphone supporting super-fast LTE connectivity and download speeds”.

If all one wants is a superb phone, though, the Mate 10 still delivers. A 6-inch OLED display that runs almost edge-to-edge, in a 3D glass body curved on all sides, puts this handset on a par with the elegance of its main competitors.

The new Leica Dual Lens delivers an f/1.6 aperture, drawing level with the LG V30+ as the world’s largest aperture on a phone. The lenses come in a 20MP monochrome sensor and 12MP RGB sensor, with optical image stabilisation.

This is all powered by a mammoth 4000 mAh battery, with “AI-powered battery management, which understands user behaviour and intelligently allocates resources to maximise battery life”.

These smarts are exceptional, but they don’t come cheap. The Huawei Mate 10 Pro has a recommended retail price of R18 999.

Samsung Note 8

Samsung-Galaxy-Note-8-price-821156

The original Samsung Note, back in 2011, shocked Apple out of its small-screen obsession when it popularised the “phablet” category of large-screen phones. It is astonishing to think, then, that the first Note carried only a 5.2” screen – small by today’s standards.

It is also astonishing to recall that Apple made TV ads that mocked that size. It tried to convince the market that no one would ever want to use two hands to operate a phone. Its mockery was eventually silenced by the market, and Apple gave in with the 5.5” iPhone 6 Plus in 2014.

The Note series is as much about Apple as it is about Samsung, as it tends to clear a path for Apple’s next iteration – which the American media then hails as invention and innovation. Samsung doesn’t mind too much, as it manufacturers many of the key components that go into Apple devices.

Most of all, it tells us about the size of the next, next iPhone. There seems to be a three-year lag between the Note going for the next size up, and Apple following suit, so the iPhone XIII in 2020 can be expected to carry a screen similar to the 6.3” beast on the Note 8.

The Note 8 display is dazzling, thanks to its Quad HD screen, at 1440 x 2960 pixels, with an incredibly dense 521 pixels per inch (ppi). It is powered by the cutting edge Snapdragon 835 chipset, which is also found in the LG V30+ and Sony Xperia XZ1 reviewed last week, meaning greater efficiency for its 3300 mAh battery.

The software allows simultaneous 4K video and 9MP image recording, along with face and smile detection. Facial recognition is the start of the biometrics on this device, rounded out by an iris scanner, and rear-mounted fingerprint recognition.

That sensor goes a step further for the health conscious, with heart rate measurement as well as SpO2 – peripheral capillary oxygen saturation – designed for high-performance sports or fitness enthusiasts to measure the amount of oxygen in the blood. Until now, that was only available on specialist fitness devices.

The one area where Samsung did follow Apple was in its voice assitance technology, which has evolved from the S-Voice search engine to the Bixby AI-enhanced system for context recognition, natural language commands and dictation.

If that sounds like a remarkably rich package, it is matched by its price tag, which starts at R18 500.

Apple iPhone X

iphonex_mockup_phonedesigner.0

The iPhone X has been hailed by Time magazine as one of the inventions of the year, which says more about American media coverage of technology than it does about the iPhone.

Saying it “is arguably the world’s most sophisticated smartphone, with a screen that stretches from edge to edge, a processor optimised for augmented reality and a camera smart enough to allow users to unlock the phone with their face”, TIme admits in parentheses: “though some of these features first arrived on devices from Samsung and LG”.

Those features to indeed make it a superb phone, in a frame that remains one of the most imitated phone bodies in the world. Probably the most outstanding feature is the one that is no longer there: the home button, which is replaced by a swipe gesture.

Here, Apple does lead the way, towards a phone world where specific buttons will be less important than voice, gesture and context. In most other respects, it matches up to the innovations of its peers. A dual 12MP camera with simultaneous 4K video and 8MP image recording (sound familiar?) and smile detection makes it similar to the Note 8.  However, a telephoto lens now  includes image stabilisation, meaning smooth zooming in and out while filming.

The one area where the iPhone does stand head and shoulders above any Android device is that its software updates roll out uniformly across all devices, and don’t leave any recent models behind. That., however, is a feature of the iOS operating system, rather than the iPhone X as such. In combination, though, it makes for a package as compelling as anything an Android device can throw at the market.

It would need to be, since it starts at R20 499 for the 64GB model, and around R3 000 more 256GB.

  • Arthur Goldstuck is founder of World Wide Worx and editor-in-chief of Gadget.co.za. Follow him on Twitter on @art2gee and on YouTube.

Featured

Kenya tool to help companies prepare for emergencies

After its team members survived last week’s Nairobi terror attack, Ushahidi decided to release a new preparedness tool for free, writes its CEO, NAT MANNING

Published

on

On Tuesday I woke up a bit before 7am in Berkeley, California where I live. I made some coffee and went over to my computer to start my work day. I checked my Slack and the news and quickly found out that there was an ongoing terrorist attack at 14 Riverside Complex in Nairobi, Kenya. The Ushahidi office is in Nairobi and about a third of our team is based there (the rest of us are spread across 10 other countries).

As I read the news, my heart plummeted, and I immediately asked the question, “is everyone on my team okay?”

Five years ago Al-Shabaab committed a similar attack at the Westgate Mall. We spent several tense hours figuring out if any of our team had been in the mall, and verifying that everyone was safe. We found out that one of our team member’s family was caught up in the attack. Luckily they made it out.

At Ushahidi we make software for crisis response, including tools to map disasters and election violence, and yet we felt helpless in the face of this attack. In the days following the Westgate attack, our team huddled and thought about what we could build that would help our team — and other teams — if we found ourselves in a similar situation to this attack again. We identified that when we first learned of the attack, nearly everyone at Ushahidi had spent that first precious few hours trying to answer the basic questions, “Is everyone okay?”, and if not, “Who needs help?” 

People had ad-hoc used multiple channels such as WhatsApp, called, emailed, or texted. We had done this for each person at Ushahidi (their job), in our families, and important people in our community. Our process was unorganised, inefficient, repetitive, and frustrating.

And from this problem we created TenFour, a check in tool that makes it easier for teams to reach one another during times of crisis. It is a simple application that lets people send a message to their team via SMS, Slack, Voice, email, and in-app, and get a response. It also works for educational institutions, companies with distributed staff, as well as part of neighbourhood networks like neighbourhood watches.

This week when I woke up to the news of the attack at Riverside, I immediately opened up the TenFour app.

Click here to read how Nat quickly confirmed the safety of his team.

Previous Page1 of 3

Continue Reading

Featured

Kia multi-collision airbags

Published

on

The world’s first multi-collision airbag system has been unveiled by Hyundai Motor Group subsidiary KIA Motors, with the aim of improving airbag performance in multi-collision accidents.

Multi-collision accidents are those in which the primary impact is followed by collisions with secondary objects, such as other vehicles, trees, or electrical posts, which occur in three out of every 10 accidents. Current airbag systems do not offer secondary protection when the initial impact is insufficient to cause them to deploy. 

However, the multi-collision airbag system allows airbags to deploy effectively upon a secondary impact, by calibrating the status of the vehicle and the occupants.

The new technology detects occupants’ positions in the cabin following an initial collision. When occupants are forced into unusual positions, the effectiveness of existing safety technology may be compromised. Multi-collision airbag systems are designed to deploy even faster when initial safety systems may not be effective, providing additional safety when drivers and passengers are most vulnerable. By recalibrating the collision intensity required for deployment, the airbag system responds more promptly during the secondary impact, thereby improving the safety of multi-collision vehicle occupants.

“By improving airbag performance in multi-collision scenarios, we expect to significantly improve the safety of our drivers and passengers,” said Taesoo Chi, head of the Hyundai Motor Group’s Chassis Technology Centre. “We will continue our research on more diverse crash situations as part of our commitment to producing even safer vehicles that protect occupants and prevent injuries.”

According to statistics by the National Automotive Sampling System Crashworthiness Data System (NASS-CDS), an office of the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA) in USA, about 30% of 56,000 vehicle accidents from 2000 to 2012 in the North American region involved multi-collisions. The leading type of multi-collision accidents involved cars crossing over the centre line (30.8%), followed by collisions caused by a sudden stop at highway tollgates (13.5%), highway median strip collisions (8.0%), and sideswiping and collision with trees and electric poles (4.0%). 

These multi-collision scenarios were analysed in multilateral ways to improve airbag performance and precision in secondary collisions. Once commercialised, the system will be implemented in future new KIA vehicles. 

Continue Reading

Trending

Copyright © 2018 World Wide Worx