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Airtickets about to evolve

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PayU, the company that secures payments for SAA, Mango, Flysafair and Skywise, believes that airline ticket payments are set to transition over the next five years, making it even easier and safer to secure seats.

Air travel may be statistically safer than other forms, but what about the transactions that surround it?

According to Airports Company South Africa (ACSA) figures, over 9.5 million passengers bought tickets for domestic flights in 2014. In this August alone – the latest statistics available – the number stands at more than 743 thousand.

International Air Transport Association passenger numbers are predicted to reach 7.3 billion by 2034, more than double that of 2014 and 2015. China with 856 million new passengers is expected to overtake the US (559 million) in volumes with India (266 million), Indonesia (183 million) and Brazil (170 million) sitting in the top five.

These figures underscore the importance of having secure and dynamic payment systems that tap into the trends and recognise how people use technology to purchase their tickets and handle their travel.

One fraudulent transaction can cost thousands of Rands, and for the airline companies sound fraud management is essential, as this will impact on the business significantly. Air travel is a capital-intensive industry – it costs around R100k to fly from Johannesburg to Cape Town and the margins are slim. While only 8% of payments are cash-free in South Africa, that 8% is valuable and needs to be driven even higher through availability, security and ensuring trust.

“All businesses are exposed to fraud, and it can be a big issue for airline operators and the consumer,” says Kirby Gordon, Vice President: Sales and Distribution at Flysafair. “The biggest hesitation around online transactions is always around the payment system. The fear of fraud and the reality of it are daunting as our transactions are often big numbers.”

When the plane takes off, the seats leave with it. Every detail must be attended to or there is potential for both the customer and corporate to suffer either loss of funds or, for the corporate, reputation.

“When profit margins are thin and the capacity to be defrauded is high you really need a stable payment system. We are conscious that all of our payments are maintained properly so that when a flight departs, we have the funds in our account,” says Gordon.

Airline ticket purchases make up the largest portion of e-commerce transactions in South Africa. And, according to Euromonitor, the local online travel market is estimated at approximately R17.7 billion in 2015.  PayU, the company that secures payments for SAA, Mango, Flysafair and Skywise, believes that airline ticket payment is set to transition over the next five years.

“The airline industry represents a microcosm of the payments industry as a whole, with nuances and challenges around dynamic stock movement and modifications keeping us on our toes,” says Mustapha Zaouini, CEO of PayU MEA. “This will only get more intricate as the power continues to shift to the consumer and payment methods become more on-demand.”

The fast-evolving ticketing ecosystem will play a significant role in the flying experience, says Gordon. “There is a need for high level augmentation in the airline payments environment, not a standard payment gateway,” says Gordon. “In our world, modifications to bookings are a frequent occurrence – changing flights, adding a suitcase, buying an extra seat or insurance. That payment needs to be taken a second time and recorded against the first to ensure we have a complete record. It can get complicated. The next phase will be accepting in-flight payment.”

Corporate travellers commit the worst offences in airline booking with around 31-37% of reservations requiring modifications. Flysafair has led the way in unbundling in South Africa, taking the suitcase out of the net fare paid and making check-in optional. With 42% of passengers booking a bag it means that the remainder may change their mind at the last minute, impacting the transaction and the tally. While this presents challenges it also offers further opportunity.

“The trends we are seeing in mobile development are huge and are playing a giant role in how the payment industry is advancing. This means that working with a partner like PayU, one that is aware of these shifts and is prepared for them, ensures that our customer’s credit cards stay as safe as they do when they fly with us.”

Juniper Research has predicted that mobile tickets and digital ticketing are expected to take more than one in two ticket transactions by 2019. This means that payment methods such as credit and debit cards will increasingly move to digital and this demands that the security around payment needs to be completely watertight.

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Win a Poster Heater with Gadget and Takealot.com

This winter Gadget and Takealot.com are giving away three Poster Heaters, which look like posters but become heaters when you plug them in.

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Three Gadget readers will each win a unit, valued at R550 each. To enter, follow @GadgetZA and @Takealot on Twitter and tell us on the @GadgetZA account how many Watts the heater consumes.

What’s the big deal about these heaters? Many of us are struggling to keep the balance between soaring electricity costs and the need to keep warm this winter.

However, the recently launched Poster Heater by EasyHeat and distributed in South Africa by Takealot.com is not only one of the most cost effective electric heaters currently on the market, it is also easy to setup and use.

As the name indicates, it is a poster similar to one you would hang on a wall. But, plug it in and it turns into a 300 Watt heater. The Poster Heater isn’t designed to heat hallways or large rooms, but rather smaller ones like a bedroom or a baby’s nursery or a dressing room.

It uses radiant heating, which means that it heats up in a couple of minutes and the heat is directed at the objects or people around it, quickly taking the chill out of the air and providing a comfortable ambient temperature.

The other advantage of radiant heating is that it doesn’t dry out the air like infrared or gas heaters. Users also don’t have to worry about their children or pets getting too close to it because, even though it gets hot, it can be touched.

To enter the competition follow the steps below:

Competition entry details:

1. Follow @GadgetZA and @Takealot on Twitter. (We will ONLY be accepting entires via Twitter, so please don’t enter through the comments section of this article.)

2. Tell us on Twitter, via @GadgetZA, mentioning @Takealot in your posting, how many Watts the Poster Heater consumes.

cleardot.gif3. The competition closes on 31 July 2018.

4. Winners will be notified via Twitter on 1 August and Takealot.com will be in touch to organise delivery.

5. The competition is only open to South African residents.

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Arts and Entertainment

Deezer to host Hotstix’s Mandela tribute playlist

Deezer is celebrating Nelson Mandela on the centenary of his birthday by hosting a tribute playlist created by music legend Sipho “Hotstix” Mabuse.  

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Mabuse, a legendary figure in African music, first rose to prominence in the 1970s with his band Harari and later developed a name for himself as a solo artist. One of his best known songs was the global hit BurnOut in the 1980s.

The playlist takes the listener on a captivating musical journey through the life of Nelson Mandela.  It was compiled by Mabuse, who consulted with Mandela’s family and friends to ensure that the music would be relevant and accurate. The playlist also features commentary by Mabuse, which was recorded in his Soweto home.  

“I have tried to tell the story of the music that Madiba loved,” says Mabuse. “The Playlist excludes the time in prison obviously, as Madiba would not have had exposure to music in that time.  We have focused on the music we know he loved before and after that period. This recording was really an emotional journey for me, but an incredible opportunity to document these memories.”

The playlist features the music the young Mandela loved, such as The Manhattan Brothers, Solomon Linda, Brenda Fassie and Miriam Makeba.  It includes struggle songs from Chicco, Johnny Clegg, Hugh Masekela and Yvonne Chaka Chaka.  The playlist also includes Mandela by Zahara, one of the younger artists who caught Madiba’s ear.

Mabuse also offers stories of his own songs, such as Shikisha, a song greatly beloved by the former President.

“I was delighted to share my thoughts and hope the listeners enjoyed the musical journey,” says Mabuse. “Madiba did enjoy music immensely and we all have a purpose wherever we are in the world to celebrate culture and to learn from different cultures and music forms and styles.”

This playlist was inspired by the Nelson Mandela 100 campaign, calling on corporates and individuals to act as sources of inspiration and engage in conversation and action.

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