Connect with us

Featured

3D printing: What would Da Vinci say?

Published

on

When relatively new technology receives the endorsement of a megastar such as Black Eyed Peas will.i.am, its popularity skyrockets and suddenly the application possibilities seem endless.

Appointed recently as the chief creative officer of a global 3D printing company, will.i.am has set about taking 3D printing beyond the limited reach of staunch tech enthusiasts. His aim is to promote a simple-to-operate 3D printer that would reduce material waste by using recycled materials. This effort to promote sustainable living and highlight the environmental impact of manufacturing is only the tip of an iceberg that is both mind-blowingly large and infinitely useful.

 

 

“3D printing has been around for some time. However, consumers have recently begun to become more engaged in the 3D printing value chain,” says Simon Bromfield, Channel Manager at Adobe Systems Sub-Saharan Africa. “When most people talk about 3D printing, the focus is on the printers. But what will ultimately drive the growth of the consumer 3D printing market is the availability of content that is compelling to consumers.”

3D printing or additive manufacturing is being developed and adapted to spread its influence across a number of sectors and processes. 2014 has seen a number of significant breakthroughs in the use of this technology. Swedish supercar manufacturer, Koenigsegg recently unveiled the One:1, a supercar that utilises many components that were 3D printed. This year, 3D printing has begun to be used in production versions of spaceflight hardware. Healthcare advances have also been profound: scientists are using 3D printing and living tissue to produce ears, kidneys and livers.

But one of the most rapidly evolving applications of 3D printing is taking place in the creative space. Sculptors, modelers, artists, concept designers, illustrators and even jewellers and architects are embracing the potential of 3D printing to create complex objects that could not be made in other ways.

“A big part of what influences the value of content has to do with colour. Much of the content created today is monochrome, but with the right software, creative and designers have the control and flexibility to add colour, polish and texture to transform a 3D object into something meaningful and vibrant,” says Bromfield.

Designer Francis Bitonti, well known in design circles for a 3D printed gown that he created for fashion icon Dita von Teese, sees computational methodologies, smart materials and interactive environments as an opportunity to create new aesthetic languages for the creative industry.

“My design process is a collaboration with artificial intelligence,” says Bitoni. “We are transposing these ideas from design methodologies to tangible consumer experiences.”

In order for creatives to produce inspirational pieces, many of them are working with software that is developed specifically for the production of physical output.

Tobias Klein, architect and creator of The Garden of Earthly Delights, an art piece orientated on the work of Hieronymous Bosch and featured at the 3D Print Show London 2014, explains its use in practice: “We use Photoshop CC distinctively at the front end in its capability to quickly generate artwork and colour schemes for the later application onto the models. This helps us considerably to communicate the design in a fast and effective way as we can export the painted models between various platforms.”

“3D printing has opened up a creative pathway that is fantastical, boundless and alive with possibilities,” says Bromfield. “The production of high quality full colour content is already changing high-end jewellery, sculptures, household goods, fashion and architecture. Technologically advanced software can turn visionary design ideas into tangible reality.”

 

* Follow Gadget on Twitter on @GadgetZA

Featured

Huawei Mate 20 Pro matches camera benchmark record

A benchmark by DxOMark sees the triple-cam handset tie with the P20 Pro for best smartphone camera on the market.

Published

on

The Huawei Mate 20 Pro has come out top in a camera benchmark test that assesses all aspects of smartphone camera performance.

DxOMark, which conducts rigorous hardware testing and is trusted as an industry standard for image quality measurements, has just released the results of its in-depth analysis of the Huawei Mate 20 Pro smartphone camera. 

The Huawei Mate 20 Pro is the Chinese manufacturer’s latest top-end device. Building on the P20 Pro’s camera technology, the Mate 20 Pro comes with a Leica-branded triple-camera setup, but swaps its stable-mate’s monochrome camera for a super-wide-angle module, offering a 35mm-equivalent focal length range from 16 to 80mm—the widest of all current smartphone cameras.

The handset is in direct competition with the Apple iPhone XS Max, the Google Pixel 3 XL, the Samsung Galaxy Note 9, among other. How does it fare?

“With a total photo score of 114, the Huawei Mate 20 Pro ties the record-setting score of its cousin, the P20 Pro,” says DxOMark. “The overall Photo score is calculated from sub-scores in tests that examine different aspects of its performance under different lighting conditions.”

The Huawei Mate 20 Pro achieves a photo score of 114 points. In stills mode, the Mate 20 Pro’s triple camera captures images with good target exposure and a wide dynamic range, recording both good highlight and shadow detail even in difficult high-contrast situations. Noise levels are well under control down to low light levels, and the camera’s white balance system and colour rendering settings produce a pleasant colour response in almost all circumstances.

At 97 points, the Mate 20 Pro is very close to the best for video as well, thanks to a fast and smooth autofocus system with good tracking performance, accurate white balance as well as pleasant colour rendering, and low levels of noise, especially in bright shooting conditions. Our testers also liked the exposure system’s ability to adapt quickly and smoothly to changes in illumination.

It was not all good news. DxOMark also had some criticism for the device.

Click here to read about the drawbacks of the Mate 20 Pro camera, and other positives.

Previous Page1 of 2

Continue Reading

Featured

SA car wins
Dakar Rally

Published

on

The final stage of Dakar 2019 drew to a close at the bivouac in Pisco, Peru, and saw Toyota Gazoo Racing South Africa’s Nasser Al Attiyah and Mathieu Baumel bring home their South African-built Toyota Hilux for an historic victory. Not only was it a first win for Toyota, but it was also the first petrol-powered car to win the Dakar in the South-American era.

The Qatari driver ensured his French navigator, who turned 43 years old on Thursday, 17 January, received a great birthday present, when the pair arrived at the final time control of Dakar 2019 with teammates Giniel de Villiers and Dirk von Zitzewitz in close formation. The two Toyota Hilux crews completed the entire stage together, as De Villiers / Von Zitzewitz waited nearly 55 minutes for the leaders to start the stage, in order to shadow them to the finish.

The emotions bubbled over for Team Principal Glyn Hall, who found himself without words as his two crews drove into the media area after the time control. “This victory was long overdue,” he finally managed, before being swamped in a sea of well-wishers.

The winning driver, however, was much more vocal: “We are so happy to win the Dakar – not only for ourselves, but also for Toyota and the entire Toyota Gazoo Racing SA team. Everyone has worked so hard for so long, and really deserve this. Thank you for letting us drive this car.”

Toyota Gazoo Racing SA led Dakar 2019 from the first to the last stage, with Al Attiyah/Baumel drawing first blood, before handing the mantle to De Villiers / Von Zitzewitz during stage 2. But then a disastrous Stage 3 saw the Qatari retake the lead – a lead he didn’t relinquish despite some of the toughest stages yet seen on any South-American Dakar.

“When we first heard that the rally was going to take place only in one country, we were skeptical,” said Hall after regaining composure. “But the organisers made sure that this year’s race will long be remembered as one of the toughest tests in the last decade.”

Al Attiyah / Baumel’s victory at Dakar 2019 means that Toyota Gazoo Racing has now won both of the world’s toughest automotive races – the 24 Hours of Le Mans, and the DakarRally.

Click here to read Glyn Hall’s comment on winning the Dakar Rally, as well as the rankings.

Previous Page1 of 3

Continue Reading

Trending

Copyright © 2018 World Wide Worx