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New Pokemons to pocket

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The Pokémon Company and Nintendo have announced new Pokémon that can be found in the Pokémon Sun and Pokémon Moon video games for Nintendo 3DS.

These Pokémon appear in the newest Pokémon video games, launching in Europe and South Africa on November 23:

Team Skull

In the Alola region, a group of ruffians known as Team Skull causes a lot of trouble. They steal other people’s Pokémon, mess up the trial sites, and delight in all kinds of evil deeds.

Team Skull Boss: Guzma

Guzma is the boss of Team Skull, the one who holds these ruffians together. Guzma pours on the attacks, battling without mercy. He certainly does seem strong, but he claims that he “never could become captain.” He seems to have a bone to pick with Professor Kukui, as well.

Team Skull Admin: Plumeria

Plumeria is considered the big sister of Team Skull. She’s a tough lady who keeps the members of Team Skull in line and working together, in the sort of way a strict older sister would. She seems to care for the Grunts who are below her in the pecking order, and she’s not one to let it go if anyone gives them a walloping.

Team Skull Grunts

Both male and female Team Skull Grunts wear matching black Skull Tanks. And these uniforms aren’t even provided for them—all Grunts have to buy their own!

The newly revealed Pokémon include:

Wishiwashi

Type: Water

Wishiwashi have a new Ability, Schooling, which no Pokémon has previously had. Under certain conditions, Wishiwashi will change in battle to their School Form.

  • Solo Form

A single Wishiwashi is tiny and weak. Measuring just eight inches from nose to tail, Wishiwashi is very small, even for a Pokémon. Yet the people of the Alola region seem to view it as a terrifying Pokémon. When it’s in danger, Wishiwashi’s glistening eyes catch the light and shine out, sending a distress signal to its allies.

  • School Form

The seemingly weak Wishiwashi is called the demon of the sea because of its ferocious School Form. When Wishiwashi receive a distress signal, they unite in a huge battle formation.

Pyukumuku

Type: Water

Due to their appearance and way of life, Pyukumuku are considered unappealing to tourists. Part-time work pulling Pyukumuku off the beach and chucking them back into the sea is available at tourist beaches. But no matter how far they’re thrown, Pyukumuku will always return to the same spot. Pyukumuku have a new Ability, Innards Out, which no other Pokémon has had before. When this Pokémon faints, Innards Out lets it dish out a final bit of damage to its opponent, equal to the amount of HP it had left before it received the final blow.

Morelull

Type: Grass/Fairy

Morelull are nocturnal Pokémon that walk around at night on their leg-like roots. They move because staying in one spot and sucking all the nutrients from the soil would cause surrounding plants to wither. With their roots, they make contact with other Morelull and communicate with one another.

Pokémon Adapted to the Alola Region

Some Pokémon have adapted to the distinctive microclimates of the Alola region and have taken on different forms than they have in other regions. These Pokémon are called regional variants. After settling in the Alola region, they live like native Pokémon. These regional variant Pokémon can have different appearances and types, and their way of living can also differ from that of the forms previously known.

Alolan Meowth 

Type: Dark

Meowth is a Pokémon that did not originally live in the Alola region. They were sent to the royal family of Alola as an offering from another region, and only a select few could have them as partners. It’s said that the Meowth that were offered to the royalty lived a life of luxury and pampering, which led them to have a selfish and prideful attitude. This caused Meowth’s form to change.

Alolan Marowak

Type: Fire/Ghost

The Marowak in the Alola region take bones and light both ends on fire by rubbing them against their foreheads. Then they spin the bones around! Marowak’s rarity and its fearsome appearance when it dances with its bone led the people of Alola to dub it a conjurer and regard it with fear.

Alolan Raichu

Type: Electric/Psychic

The Raichu in Alola have two types—Electric and Psychic—and they are able to wield psychic power. What’s more, they can gather their psychic power in their tails and then ride on them to float in the air!

A new trailer that showcases these new Pokémon and much more can be found here: Video

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Get your passwords in shape

New Year’s resolutions should extend to getting password protection sorted out, writes Carey van Vlaanderen, CEO at ESET Southern Africa.

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Many of us have entered the new year with a boat load of New Year’s resolutions.  Doing more exercise, fixing unhealthy eating habits and saving more money are all highly respectable goals, but could it be that they don’t go far enough in an era with countless apps and sites that scream for letting them help you reach your personal goals.

Now, you may want to add a few weightier and yet effortless habits on top of those well-worn choices. Here are a handful of tips for ‘exercises’ that will go good for your cyber-fitness.

I won’t pass up on stubborn passwords

Passwords have a bad rap, and deservedly so: they suffer from weaknesses, both in terms of security and convenience, that make them a less-than-ideal method of authentication.  However, much of what the internet offers is independent on your singing up for this or that online service, and the available form of authentication almost universally happens to the username/password combination.

As the keys that open online accounts (not to speak of many devices), passwords are often rightly thought of as the first – alas, often only – line of defence that protects your virtual and real assets from intruders. However, passwords don’t offer much in the way of protection unless, in the first place, they’re strong and unique to each device and account.

But what constitutes a strong password?  A passphrase! Done right, typical passphrases are generally both more secure and more user-friendly than typical passwords. The longer the passphrase and the more words it packs the better, with seven words providing for a solid start. With each extra character (not to mention words), the number of possible combinations rises exponentially, which makes simple brute-force password-cracking attacks far less likely to succeed, if not well-nigh impossible (assuming, of course, that the service in question does not impose limitations on password input length – something that is, sadly, far too common).

Click here to read about making secure passwords by not using dictionary words, using two-factor authentication, and how biometrics are coming to web browsers.

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Code Week prepares 2.3m young Africans for future

By SUNIL GENESS, Director Government Relations & CSR, Global Digital Government, at SAP Africa.

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On January 6th, 2019, news broke of South African President Cyril Ramaphosa’s plans to announce a new approach to education in his second State of the Nation address, including:

  • A universal roll-out of tablets for all pupils in the country’s 23 700 primary and secondary schools
  • Computer coding and robotics classes for the foundation-phase pupils from grade 1-3 and the
  • Digitisation of the entire curriculum, , including textbooks, workbooks and all teacher support material.

With this, the President has shown South Africa’s response to a global challenge: equipping our youth with the skills they’ll need to survive and thrive in the 21st century digital economy.

Africa’s working-age population will increase to 600 million in 2030 from a base of 370 million in 2010.

In South Africa, unemployment stands at 26.7 percent, but is much more pronounced among youths: 52.2 percent of the country’s 15-24-year-olds are looking for work.

As an organisation deeply invested in South Africa and its future, SAP has developed and implemented a range of initiatives aimed at fostering digital skills development among the country’s youth, including:

AFRICA CODE WEEK

Since its launch in 2015, Africa Code Week has introduced more than 4 million African youth to basic coding.

In 2018, more than 2.3 million youth across 37 countries took part in Africa Code Week.

The digital skills development initiative’s focus on building local capacity for sustainable learning resulted in close to 23 000 teachers being trained in the run-up to the October 2018 events.

Vital to the success of Africa Code Week is the close support it receives from a broad spectrum of public and private sector institutions, including UNESCO YouthMobile, Google, the German Federal Ministry for Economic Cooperation and Development (BMZ), the Cape Town Science Centre, the Camden Education Trust, 28 African governments, over 130 implementing partners and 120 ambassadors across the continent.

SAP’s efforts to drive digital skills development on the African continent forms part of a broader organisational commitment to the UN Sustainable Development Goals, specifically Goal 4 (“Ensure quality and inclusive education for all”)

A core component of Africa Code Week is to encourage female participation in STEM-related skills development activities: in 2018, more than 46% of all Africa Code Week participants were female.

According to Africa Code Week Global Coordinator Sunil Geness, female representation in STEM-related fields among African businesses currently stands at 30%, “requiring powerful public-private partnerships to start turning the tide and creating more equitable opportunities for African youth to contribute to the continent’s economic development and success”.

Click here to read more about the Skills for Africa graduate training programme, and about the LEGO League.

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