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Time to prioritise apps

App complexity has become even more confusing as businesses move to a multi-cloud world. But there are practical ways to tackle it, writes IAN JANSEN VAN RENSBURG, Senior Manager: Systems Engineering at VMware Southern Africa

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When discussing the impact of technology on the organisation, we’ve typically done so in terms of platforms and infrastructure:  on-premise, off-premise, cloud, data centers, networks, Edge. And you might measure value and effectiveness in terms of the value of cost optimization, agility, speed to market, security, compliance, control and choice. What this focus overlooks is what’s actually driving business decisions today – something that, until a few years ago, most people outside of the IT department didn’t really think about – applications. 

Everything changed when we, ‘the consumer’, got our hands on the iPhone and its App Store. Now, in only a handful of years, and with Application Marketplaces for every operating system, enterprises are thinking ‘app first’. But not all applications were created equal, and each app’s value must be measured in terms of how core it is to the business. 

So, what’s mission critical, what’s business critical and what’s customer facing? It’s this prioritisation of applications that is ultimately informing IT decisions, whether it’s a mission critical app that must deliver complete security without compromising its performance, or a consumer-facing service that needs to have the scalability to manage major spikes in use without constantly consuming vast amounts of resource, such as a retailer’s mobile commerce offering. The type of application is also a major factor – if you have a bespoke app that has sat at the core of your business for many years, like an automated pricing tool for a logistics company, simply lifting and shifting to the cloud will not work. With access to its data so critical, the decision may be made to keep it in its existing environment for the time being. 

These are all factors that influence the criteria for choosing the right platform. The challenge is that with each application requiring different operating systems and platforms, and no one platform yet being able to offer all benefits without being prohibitively expensive, many organizations find themselves with a multitude of infrastructures and platforms with a complex application estate hosted in all sorts of places. Unfortunately, many of these applications are unable to move easily across platforms and different clouds to where they would be best located and used. Respondents to a recent VMware survey highlighted significant challenges to this situation; with integrating legacy systems (57%) and understanding new technologies (54%) two of the biggest obstacles organisations needed to overcome in order to get the best performance out of this mix of infrastructures. But is there a way of managing this ‘complex’ landscape with more ease? 

Delivering a better experience across multiple platforms

Having a clear strategy and defined approach is key. Take a retail bank for example. With physical branches as well as mobile applications and online banking services, its infrastructure will mostly be a mix of on-premise or private cloud.  With security, regulatory compliance and governance so critical, the unwieldly nature of these systems means that going with tried and trusted approaches is usually more straight forward. However, with new entrants and digital-native disruptors using public cloud providers, unencumbered by legacy systems, established players need to find a way of being able to respond quickly. Banks such as Capital One and the World Bank are deploying public cloud computing for development and testing. In this way, they enjoy the benefits of flexibility, scalability and agility without significant investment, whilst experimenting or using applications that do not draw on legacy data. 

For instance, trailing the use of blockchain to streamline letters of credit could require significant resource. As it is a pilot, however, the bank may be less keen to commit to the investment of a fully private cloud environment. Deploying a public cloud becomes attractive; it provides the necessary infrastructure, the pilot can be run, and if it is deemed a success the decision can be made to move the application over to a private cloud environment. In doing so, the bank has been able to develop, deploy and test quickly, turning around results that allow a decision to be made and, potentially, a new product to be released to the market. If it has not been a success, investment in permanent resource has not been lost. 

Another opportunity for a clearly defined approach and strategy is the opening up of banking. Driven by the likes of the Open Banking initiative in the UK and the EU’s Directive on Payment Services (PSD2), more financial institutions are giving API access to third party developers to build applications and services that consumers or businesses can use to manage their finances across multiple providers. The aim is to provide greater transparency and flexibility to customers, ultimately delivering a better experience. What it means for banks and other financial service providers is having the infrastructure in place to easily share relevant data securely – again, a mix of private and public cloud environments can support the development of third party apps without exposing core data or mission critical services to security risks or non-compliance. 

Managing talent and avoiding silos

But what does this mean for the bank’s technology team? For starters, it raises the possibility of requiring teams with multiple skillsets or, more likely, separate teams focused on separate platforms. That public cloud might be from AWS, for example, which requires a different type of skillset to the one needed to operate the private cloud, which again might not be relevant for the team managing the legacy infrastructure. IT has long been plagued by silos of teams working on individual, proprietary technology, and left unchecked, this issue will be exacerbated further by the demands of multi-platform infrastructure. The whole point of having a multi-cloud environment, of being able to securely move applications from one environment to another depending on requirements at that time, becomes much more complicated if siloed teams struggle to work together.

And these demands are only going to increase. As more and more enterprises accelerate their digital transformation agendas, they are faced with the challenge of repurposing their sprawling application estates to meet their digital requirements without compromising security. Many are already harnessing multi-cloud environments to enable transformation. The same VMware survey mentioned earlier found that 80% of respondents believed that one of the benefits of multi-cloud was improving innovation – and it makes sense; being able to get the best across multiple types of environment sounds exactly what most enterprises need to do to unlock the opportunities of digitization. 

Understanding what you need to achieve 

For a multi-cloud deployment to work, enterprises need to understand what they fundamentally require and have the hybrid cloud infrastructure to run and manage those requirements across all environments and devices. The environments used are ultimately the support, the enabler, not the objective itself; that lies with the applications. 

Yet this should also be in a constant state of evolution. As enterprises continue to digitally transform, they need to be continually reviewing and reforming their application estate. It is the ongoing process of choosing which applications are redundant, which need to be retrofitted, which can be completely transformed into cloud-native apps, and which need to be kept in legacy environments for a bit longer, all whilst being able to manage and move workloads as required. By following this approach, and by working with partners with the experience and skills required to deliver infrastructure that can efficiently run different platforms, enterprises can deliver an effective app-first approach, across any number of environments, to drive their digital business goals forward. 

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AppDate: DStv taps Xbox, Hisense for app

DStv Now app expands, FNB gets Snapchat lens, Spotify offers data saver mode, in SEAN BACHER’s apps roundup

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DStv Now for Xbox and Hisense

Usage of DStv Now, the online DStv service available free to DStv customers, is increasing rapidly with more than two million plays of live and Catch Up content per week. In addition to using DStv Now to watch TV on tablets and smartphones, an increasing number of DStv customers are also opting to use it as their primary method of getting DStv on additional TVs in the house. This is set to increase with the release of two new big-screen TV apps, one for Xbox gaming consoles (Xbox One, Xbox One S, Xbox One X) and another for Hisense smart TVs (2018 and newer models).

Expect to pay: A free download.

Platform: Any of the Xbox One range of gaming consoles and 2018 or later Hisense smart TVs.

Stockists: Visit the store linked to your Xbox console or HiSense smart TV.

Santam Safety Ideas

Start-up businesses that have a FinTech or InsurTech business venture brewing are called to enter the third annual Santam Safety Ideas competition. Safety solutions or InsurTech ventures that are ready for piloting could win up to  R150 000 worth of incubation support and R200 000 in seed funding. 

The Safety Ideas competition was launched two years ago in partnership with LaunchLab,  Stellenbosch University’s startup incubator that facilitates valuable connections for corporates and startups sourced from the startup ecosystem and partner universities in South Africa. The previous winners are Herman Bester and Anton Swanevelder, co-founders of MyLifeLine – a wearable panic device that won the competition last year; and Ntsako Mgiba and Ntandoyenkosi Shezi, co-founders of Jonga – a cost-effective security system for low income families, which won the competition in 2017.

Entries close on 28 February 2019. For more information on how to enter, visit: www.santam.co.za/safetyideas/

Click here to read about the FNB Snapchat lens, Spotify Free with data saver, and 00:37.

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Fortnite fixes hackers’ hole

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Epic Games has repaired a vulnerability that exposed Fortnite, the world’s most popular game of the moment, to hackers. The hole, which was left in Epic’s web infrastructure,  allowed hackers to target players with email that appeared to come from Epic Games, but would have led them to a phishing site, where their log-in details would have been stolen.

Researchers at cyber security solutions provider Check Point Software alerted Epic to vulnerabilities that could have affected any player of the hugely popular online battle game.

Fortnite has nearly 80 million players worldwide. The game is popular on all gaming platforms, including Android, iOS, PC via Microsoft Windows and consoles such as Xbox One and PlayStation 4.  In addition to casual players, Fortnite is used by professional gamers who stream their sessions online, and is popular with e-sports enthusiasts.

If exploited, the vulnerability would have given an attacker full access to a user’s account and their personal information as well as enabling them to purchase virtual in-game currency using the victim’s payment card details. The vulnerability would also have allowed for a massive invasion of privacy, as an attacker could listen to in-game chatter as well as surrounding sounds and conversations within the victim’s home or other location of play. 

While Fortnite players had previously been targeted by scams that deceived them into logging into fake websites that promised to generate Fortnite’s ‘V-Buck’ in-game currency, these new vulnerabilities could have been exploited without the player handing over any login details.

Click here to read how the Fortnite hack worked

To win a set of three Fortnite Funko Pop Figurines, click here.

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