Connect with us

Product of the Day

Mimecast launches Threat Intelligence dashboard

Cybersecurity company Mimecast has developed a community-based Threat Intelligence dashboard that can now identify users that are most at-risk to attack.

Click below to read about the latest in threat detection.

Published

on

The new features are designed to give organisations access to threat data and analytics specific to their overall organisation, offering a more granular view of the attacks Mimecast has blocked. The Mimecast Threat Intelligence dashboard highlights end-users who are most at-risk, malware detections, malware origin by geo-location, Indicators of Compromise (IoCs), and malware forensics based on static and behavioural analysis. 

This offers customers a community-based, tailored threat intelligence that is specific to their organisation. The data is consolidated into a user-friendly view and is also available for integration into an organisation’s security ecosystem through the Threat Feed API. This targeted threat intelligence provides greater visibility and insight to security professionals, enabling them to more easily respond and remediate against threats and malicious files.

The cybersecurity landscape changes daily, and attackers are constantly changing their techniques to avoid detection. According to Mimecast’s recent The State of Email Security Report 2019, 94 percent of organisations saw phishing attacks in the last 12 months and 61 percent said it was likely or inevitable that they would be hit with an email-borne attack. IT and security teams are often overwhelmed by the volume of information they need to track and if the intelligence they need to proactively defend their organisation is buried, their defence becomes less effective.

“As the threat landscape evolves, arming our organisation and people with the best possible tools is more important now, than ever,” says Thomas Cronkright, CEO of CertifID. “Mimecast’s Threat Intelligence is an easy to use value-added service that provides an outstanding benefit to organisations in search of a secure ecosystem.”

“The cyber threat landscape is dynamic, complex and driven by a relentless community of adversaries,” says Josh Douglas, vice president of threat intelligence at Mimecast. “IT and security teams need threat intelligence that is easy to digest and actionable, so they can better leverage the information to proactively prevent and defend against cyberattacks. Mimecast sees a lot of data, as we process more than 300 million emails every day to help customers block hundreds of thousands of malicious emails. Mimecast Threat Intelligence helps organisations get the deep insights they need to build a more cyber-resilient environment.”

Mimecast Threat Intelligence consists of a Threat Dashboard, Threat Remediation and Threat Feed with Threat Intelligence APIs that each delivers a range of capabilities including:

  • A dashboard that is designed to present information specific to each customer in a user-friendly view that gives them greater visibility and control over their security environment. The dashboard highlights end-users who are most at-risk, malware detections, malware origin by geo-location, IoCs and malware forensics based on static and behavioural analysis.
  • Threat Remediation that can be accessed directly through the Mimecast Administration Console, removing messages that contain malicious content from view, and restoring messages when necessary. 
  • The Mimecast Threat Feed which is delivered through the threat intelligence API and threat remediation API providing organisations with the ability to deliver threat intelligence directly into their broader security eco-system, including SIEMs, SOARs, next-generation firewalls, and end-point protection. Threat Intelligence APIs also help to identify and counter potential attacks and offer up remediation capabilities through the same portal by providing aggregated threat data across 35,000 Mimecast accounts, so that each individual customer can benchmark themselves against a range of company types in their geographic region, thereby offering a clearer view of threats.

The Mimecast Threat Dashboard and Threat Feed are value-added capabilities for customers with Mimecast’s Secure Email Gateway. Threat Remediation is available to customers who also have Mimecast Internal Email Protect. 

Click here to learn more about Mimecast Threat Intelligence.

Product of the Day

Acer launches new Predator Triton 500

The new Predator Triton 500 features a 10th Gen Intel Core processors, the latest Nvidia GeForce RTX Super and GTX GPUs, and fast display refresh rates of up to 300 Hz.

Published

on

Acer has unveiled the new Predator Triton 500 gaming notebook, with the latest 10th Gen Intel Core processors and newly-announced Nvidia GeForce RTX Super and GTX GPUs. 

“In addition to the latest processors and GPUs, we’ve made exciting across-the-board updates to the Predator Triton 500 and Acer Nitro 5 this year,” says Glenn du Toit, General Manager & Head of Consumer Business at Acer Africa. “Most importantly, we’ve applied new thermal technology which keeps the devices cool so gamers can enjoy the performance improvements from the latest silicon technology.” 

Backing up all the internal power, the Triton 500 offers up to 7.5 hours of battery life, making the notebook an excellent choice for working professionals who want to play too. The laptop’s 300 Hz IPS panel with a 3 ms overdrive response time displays all the action in smooth and vivid detail, covering 100% of the sRGB colour gamut while supporting wide-angle views. Nvidia G-Sync technology eliminates tearing and minimizes lag. 

It also comes with a Killer Wi-Fi 6 AX1650i wireless controller, E3100G ethernet controller, and Control Center 2.0 to push network connection quality to the Wi-Fi 6 standard. All this power is packed into a thin 17.9 mm and lightweight 2.1 kg all-metal chassis that features narrow bezels and an 81% screen-to-body ratio. The notebook has up to 32 GB of DDR4 memory and up to 2 TB of NVMe, RAID 0 SSD storage. 

The Triton 500 features Acer’s Vortex Flow technology, a new design involving three custom engineered fans strategically placed in the chassis, working in tandem to increase additional airflow while also reducing noise. This is further enhanced by CoolBoost technology, which increases fan speed for improved performance. Users can monitor the device’s temperature and adjust the fan speed through the PredatorSense UI. 

The notebook’s innovative cooling system also features an all-metal 4th Gen AeroBlade 3D fan that’s been specially designed to maximize airflow and reduce noise. Serrated edges, winglets and a curved fin allow for up to 45% increase in airflow. Adding five heat pipes to the mix, the 2020 Predator Triton 500 ultimately gets 33% better thermal performance than its 2019 counterpart. 

The Predator Triton 500 gaming notebook will be available in North America in May starting at US$2,200. Local pricing has not yet been announced. 

Continue Reading

Product of the Day

DxOMark reveals Samsung S20 Ultra audio score

The Galaxy S20 Ultra is already known for its camera, but how does its sound shape up? DxOMark’s MARIE GEORGESCU DE HILLERIN evaluates the device’s audio performance.

Published

on

The Latin word “ultra” translates as “going beyond limits”— and when it comes to Samsung’s latest smartphone, it’s a well-deserved suffix. The Galaxy S20 Ultra boasts a groundbreaking 108-megapixel main rear camera, a whopping 6.9-inch 120 Hz AMOLED display, a huge 5000 mAh battery, and an Exynos 990 chipset (Qualcomm Snapdragon 865 in the USA) with 12 GB of RAM. 

Predictably, this magnum opus also benefits from AKG’s expertise in the audio field, along with Dolby Atmos certification, Bluetooth 5.0 (which allows users to stream audio to two wireless devices at the same time), and stereo speakers. (However, wired listeners, beware: the Galaxy S20 Ultra offers no headphone jack, and no USB-C adapter either.) 

Key audio specifications: 

• AKG earphones included 
• Audio Zoom 
• Dolby Atmos 
• Bluetooth 5.0 
• No headphone jack, USB-C adapter not included 

With an overall score of 69, the Samsung Galaxy S20 Ultra manages to hold its own through our rigorous DxOMark Audio test suite. In Playback testing, the midrange frequencies (mids) and high-ends offer precision and clarity, which contribute to accurate distance rendering, precise localizability, and good wideness. Audio played back through the speakers benefits from good maximum volume, and artifacts are very well controlled. Despite being decent, however, low-end extension could use a boost, as it impairs tonal balance as well as bass precision. Finally, the balance is slightly off-center, and at minimum volumes, high dynamic content lacks intelligibility. 

As for microphone performance, the main issue is the lack of high-end extension in selfie videos, which impairs the distance rendering, localizability, and attack of recorded audio, as well as blurring the envelope and making voices sound nasal and backgrounds less natural. 

Furthermore, in high SPL (Sound Pressure Level) scenarios, an aggressive low-end compression impacts punch and generates audible temporal artifacts. In all other use cases, the overall timbre performance is fairly good; dynamics are decently captured (average SNR ratio, well-preserved plosives in life videos and memos); loudness is good in most use cases (except for indoor scenarios); and few artifacts are noticeable. 

Sub-scores explained 

The DxOMark Audio overall score of 69 for the Samsung Galaxy S20 Ultra is derived from its Playback and Recording scores and their respective sub-scores. In this section, we’ll take a closer look at these audio quality sub-scores and explain what they mean for the user. 

Playback 

Timbre 

DxOMark timbre tests measure how well a phone reproduces sound across the audible tonal range and takes into account bass, midrange, treble, tonal balance, and volume dependency. 

The Galaxy S20 Ultra offers a fairly good and consistent timbre performance across all music genres, and fares even better in movies. The overall tonal balance highlights clarity and precision in mids and high-ends. 

That said, as shown in the graph above, bass frequencies could be a little louder: up to 500 Hz, the response is clearly below that of Apple’s iPhone 11 Pro Max and Xiaomi’s Mi 10 Pro. Also, when playing games, mids and high-ends become slightly too aggressive. 

Dynamics 

Our Dynamics tests measure how well a device reproduces the energy level of a sound source. 

Predictably, the lack of low-end extension undermines the phone’s bass precision potential. Apart from that, the dynamic performance holds its head high: the clarity of timbre sharpens the attack, especially at nominal volumes, and dynamics are well preserved, even at soft volumes.  

Spatial 

The Ultra S20 has above-average spatial rendering of sound sources, ensuring that audio played back through its stereo speakers lets the listener precisely place instruments and other sound sources (localizability), and delivers good wideness. The timbre’s clarity also means that distance is accurately reproduced, thus offering a good feeling of proximity. The only cloud in the picture is the slightly off-center perception of sound sources. 

Volume 

Our Volume tests measure both the overall loudness a device is able to produce and how smoothly volume increases and decreases based on user input. 

Maximum playback volume is good, and incrementation levels are fairly consistent. By contrast, at minimum volumes, highly dynamic mixes (that is, a high ratio of amplitude from the loudest to the lowest sound) lack intelligibility. 

Artifacts 

Our Artifacts tests measure how much source audio is distorted when played back through a device’s speaker. Distortion can occur both because of sound processing in the device and because of the quality of the speakers. 

When it comes to controlling undesirable sounds, Samsung’s latest flagship ranks as second to the best of all the phones we have tested to date. No noise or temporal artifacts such as compression are audible at nominal or maximum volumes. Consequently, the clarity of loud content is well preserved. Distortion, however, shows its true colors at maximum volumes on low-end frequencies, especially when playing games and with synthetic signals. 

Recording 

Timbre 

While the S20 Ultra’s timbre performance is above average when it comes to recording life videos, it is impaired by a lack of bass extension when recording in loud environments. When recording selfie videos, treble is lacking, which results in nasal voices. 

Dynamics 

The Galaxy S20 Ultra does a reasonable job of capturing dynamics, with an average SNR (signal-to-noise) ratio in all simulated use cases. Good high-end extension in life videos and when using the memo app ensure that the plosives (sounds such as “p” and “b”) are well shaped. 

On the other hand, when filming in loud environments, an aggressive low-end compression dulls the punch. Additionally, when using the selfie camera, the shape of the sound envelope is impaired by the lack of treble, which along with the distance issue mentioned in the next paragraph, lowers speech intelligibility and attack precision. 

Spatial 

While the Galaxy S20 Ultra delivers an average performance for wideness and fairly good localizability in life videos and meeting room situations, localization and distance in selfie video recordings are once again impacted by the lack of high-end frequencies. Moreover, the memo app unfortunately records only in mono. 

Volume 

We test for both the nominal volume and the maximum level. Audio file loudness is good in most use cases, except in meeting room situations. In indoor scenarios, the overall loudness is noticeably lower. 

Artifacts 

In quiet environments, the S20 Ultra background recordings are very clean. In high SPL scenarios, apart from excessive bass compression and occasional distortion, few artifacts are noticeable. 

Regrettably, the microphones are easy to occlude, particularly when filming a selfie video or recording a memo. When the user’s hands obstruct the receivers, a noise-cancelling algorithm kicks in, introducing spectral artifacts on voices. 

Background 

The S20 Ultra does a good job of preserving the original tonal balance of the recorded background in life videos. However, when recording a selfie video, the lack of high-end is once again problematic, resulting in an unnatural background. 

Conclusion 

If the Samsung Galaxy S20 Ultra doesn’t outshine its strongest competitors in the audio area, it still delivers a very consistent, above-average performance. Volume is good, artifacts are well controlled, dynamics are generally respected, and timbre performance is good, whether in playback or recording. That all said, the memo app records in mono, and if you’re a fanatical selfie videographer, note that selfie videos suffer from a lack of treble, which impairs numerous audio attributes (tonal balance, attack, speech clarity, distance, natural background rendering). 

All in all, considering the phone’s spectacular spec sheet (and price), it is safe to assume that audio, despite its above-average performance, wasn’t Samsung’s top priority when designing its latest flagship phone. 

To read the original post, click here

Continue Reading

Trending

Copyright © 2020 World Wide Worx