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Fit2 and IconX Gear up for SA

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Samsung Electronics South Africa recently launched the Samsung Gear Fit2 and the Gear IconX, the newest additions to its range of sports trackers.

The Gear Fit2 sports band features an embedded GPS and a heart rate monitor (HRM) that offers accurate and robust fitness tracking and measurement, while providing instant feedback on the user’s workout. The Gear IconX are truly cord-free earbuds that can track fitness information and provide users with feedback on their running performance. Both the Gear Fit2 and Gear IconX are optimised to enhance training and help improve users’ fitness levels, whether users are training for a marathon or taking a daily stroll through the neighbourhood.

Craige Fleischer, Director of Integrated Mobility at Samsung Electronics South Africa, says the latest Samsung fitness wearables are designed with consumers’ fitness needs in mind, delivering features such as precise tracking technology and a standalone music player to provide users with the optimal fitness experience. “Go farther, do better and get the most out of every workout – with the Gear Fit2 and the IconX it just couldn’t be any simpler,” Fleischer mentions.

Gear Fit2: Advanced Features for Fitness

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  • Features an ergonomic, sleek and slim design for comfortable everyday use.
  • Provides a Super AMOLED curved display with a high-resolution color touchscreen for easy fitness monitor, or checking and responding to text message notifications.
  • Embedded GPS and HRM sensor for accurate data tracking of activities that fit any lifestyle.
  • With a Auto Activity Tracking feature, users won’t have to manually activate the sports band – whether running, walking, cycling, or utilizing rowing machine or elliptical trainer.
  • Enables easy transfer of fitness data between S Health and other select fitness applications, providing 1:1 competition with your friends.
  • The standalone music player enables users to actively workout with motivation without the need of a mobile device.

Gear IconX: A Simple and Wireless Experience

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  • Provides a lightweight, secure and comfortable fit with three different sizes of eartips and wingtips, activated by simply placing the earbuds in the user’s ears.
  • Enables tracking of fitness data such as distance, speed, duration, heart rate and calories burned, easily syncing with S Health.
  • Includes a Voice Guide feature that provides instant voice feedback on the user’s workout progress and provides a standalone music listening experience.
  • With Bluetooth capability and an internal storage that can play up to 1,000 MP3s – users can simply tap or swipe the earbuds to easily control the music.

“Throughout the journey of bringing new innovations and concepts to the smart wearable market, Samsung has bravely pioneered this category with its advanced wearable portfolio. The new Gear Fit2 and Gear IconX encourage consumers to stay healthy and active with Samsung’s range of smart lifestyle products,” concludes Fleischer.

The Gear Fit2 is currently available in South Africa at Dion Wired, Incredible Connection, Makro and Samsung brand stores. The Gear IconX will be available locally in August at Dion Wired, Incredible connection, Makro, Samsung brand stores and TFG (The Foschini Group) stores.

SPECIFICATIONS GEAR FIT2 GEAR ICONX
Display 1.5”, Curved Super AMOLED 216 x 432
Chipset Dual Core (1 GHz)
Memory 512 MB (RAM) / 4 GB Storage 4 GB / up to 1,000 songs
Connectivity Bluetooth v 4.2 Bluetooth v 4.1
Sensor Accelerometer, Gyro, HRM, Built-in GPS, Barometer Accelerometer, HR, Capacitive Touch
Dimension 24.5 (W) x 51.2 (D) mm Earbud: 18.9 (W) x 26.0 (D) /

Case: 92.0 (W) x 35.3 (D)

Weight Small: 28g

Large: 30g

Earbud: 6.3g per earbud /

Case: 52g

Battery 200mAh Earbud: 47mAh /

Charging Case: 315mAH

Compatibility Android 4.4/ RAM 1.5 GB Android 4.4/ RAM 1.5 GB
OS
  • TIZEN
  • Notifications (SNS, call, email, applications, schedule)
  • Black, blue and pink
Speaker Dynamic Driver
Microphone 2ea per earbud
Additional

Features

  • Small (Size of the wrist: 125 ~ 170mm)
  • Large (Size of the wrist: 155 ~ 210mm)
  • IP68 certified (up to 30 minutes in up to 1.5m of water)
  • Standalone music player
  • Black, blue and white
  • Splash resistant (P2i Nano Coating)
  • Standalone music player
  • Voice guide (available in 15 languages)
Audio Audio formats: MP3, WMA, WAV, AAC, M4A, AMR, AWB, OGG, OGA, 3GA Audio formats: MP3, WMA v9, WAV, AAC, M4A

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Jaguar drives dictionary definition

Jaguar is calling for the Oxford English Dictionary and Oxford Dictionaries to update their online definition of the word ‘car’

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Jaguar is spearheading a campaign for the Oxford English Dictionary (OED) and Oxford Dictionaries (OxfordDictionaries.com) to change their official online definitions of the word ‘car’.

The I-PACE, Jaguar’s all-electric performance SUV, is the 2019 World Car of the Year and European Car of the Year. However, strictly speaking, the zero-emission vehicle isn’t defined as a car.

The OED, the principal historical dictionary of the English language, defines a ‘car’ in its online dictionary as: ‘a road vehicle powered by a motor (usually an internal combustion engine) designed to carry a driver and a small number of passengers, and usually having two front and two rear wheels, esp. for private, commercial, or leisure use’.

Whereas the current definition of a ‘car’ on Oxford Dictionaries.com, a collection of dictionary websites produced by Oxford University Press (OUP), the publishing house of the University of Oxford, is: ‘A road vehicle, typically with four wheels, powered by an internal combustion engine and able to carry a small number of people.’

To remedy the situation, Jaguar has submitted a formal application to the OED and OxfordDictionaries.com to have the definitions updated to include additional powertrains, including electric vehicles (EV).

David Browne, head of Jaguar Land Rover’s naming committee, said: “A lot of time and thought is put into the name of any new vehicle or technology to ensure it is consumer friendly, so it’s surprising to see that the definition of the car is a little outdated. We are therefore inviting the Oxford English Dictionary and the Oxford Dictionaries to update its online classification to reflect the shift from traditional internal combustion engines (ICE) towards more sustainable powertrains.”

The Oxford English Dictionary is widely regarded as the accepted authority on the English language. It is an unsurpassed guide to the meaning, history, and pronunciation of 600,000 words – past and present – from across the English-speaking world.

Jaguar unveiled the I-PACE, its first all-electric vehicle, last year to deliver sustainable sports car performance, next-generation artificial intelligence (AI) technology and five-seat SUV practicality.

Featuring a state-of-the-art 90kWh lithium-ion battery, two Jaguar-designed motors and a bespoke aluminium structure, the I-PACE is capable of 0-100km/h in 4.8 seconds and a range of up to 470km (WLTP).

While both the Oxford English Dictionary and Oxford Dictionaries review the application, Jaguar is encouraging people to get behind the campaign by asking how the word ‘car’ should be defined. Contact Jaguar on TwitterFacebook and Instagram using #RedefineTheCar with your thoughts.

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How Internet blocks visually impaired

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Picture: Amelie-Benoist / Getty Images

A pervasive “digital divide” inhibits blind people from accessing the Internet, according to a study conducted by Nucleus Research for Deque Systems, an accessibility software company specialising in digital equality. This results in visits to websites being abandoned, further resulting in a missed market opportunity for the websites in question.

The study, which conducted in-depth interviews with 73 U.S. adults who are blind or have severe visual impairments, revealed that two-thirds of the Internet transactions initiated by people with vision impairments end in abandonment because the websites they visit aren’t accessible enough. Ninety percent of those surveyed said they regularly call a site’s customer service to report inaccessibility and have no choice but to visit another, more accessible site to make the transaction.

The Nucleus study also scanned hundreds of websites in the e-commerce, news and information and government categories and found that 70 percent had certain “critical blockers” that rendered them inaccessible to visually impaired users.

“Besides the moral dilemma and legal risk, businesses with inaccessible websites are missing a huge revenue opportunity by ignoring an untapped market,” says Preety Kumar, CEO of Deque Systems. “Among internet retailers specifically, two-thirds of the top ten online retailers had serious accessibility issues, meaning they are leaving $6.9 billion in potential North American e-commerce revenues on the table.”

Web accessibility refers to the ability of people with disabilities to independently gather information, complete transactions, or communicate on the Internet. Most visually impaired Internet users rely on assistive technologies like screen readers or screen magnifiers to render sites perceivable and operable. However, these assistive technologies require that websites be built with accessibility in mind and optimized to interface with assistive technology, in order to convey information in an accurate and understandable manner.

Critical accessibility blockers can vary across industries. In e-commerce, problems include issues like missing form and button labels (thereby making forms or the “checkout” button invisible without context). Amazon, Best Buy and Target were found to be accessibility leaders in this space. Additionally, the study found:

  • Eight out of ten news sites had significant accessibility issues.
  • Seven out of ten blind persons reported being unable to access information and services through government websites, including Medicare’s site.
  • Fewer than one in three websites have clear contact information or instructions for blind persons to seek help if they encounter accessibility issues, meaning many have low levels of success in reporting and solving these problems.

“A focus on accessibility needs to be a core part of the website design and development process,” continues Kumar. “Considering accessibility as early as the conception phase, and proactively building and testing sites for accessibility as they move towards production, is significantly more effective than remediating it later, helping organizations save significant time and resources while avoiding unnecessary customer grievances.”

To download the report, visit: https://accessibility.deque.com/nucleus-accessibility-research-2019

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