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‘Data Wunderkinds’ change how banks innovate

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Over the past few years, many companies have pursued the benefits of big data, yet are still struggling to see this material. YASAMAN HADJIBASHI, Chief Data Officer for Barclays Africa, explains the secret to her success in building a revenue-generating data team.

Banks are still in their big data infancy. Many players have created big data operations that incorporate technology, data science and analytics in search of deeper and more sophisticated consumer insights. Yet many financial institutions are finding these sizeable digital investments are not reaping the expected commercial gains, leaving senior management to question what other key ingredient is missing from this recipe.

The availability of open-source big data technologies makes the development of new products and services faster and truly scalable for big organisations such as banks. However, the barrier facing banks realise their big data potential is the lack of systematic and sustainable processes for translating and implementing insights and predictions into meaningful products and services. Until recently, these data-driven insights vanished alongside the temporary campaigns they once supported.

As with any large established organisation, there is an expectation to remain flawless and preserve one’s reputation. The reality is, the larger the institution, the less forgiving the consumer will be. However the fear of unsuccessful experimentation and reluctance to test new concepts within the banking environment is equally risky, stifling an institution’s ability to innovate and prosper in an extremely competitive environment.

The Rise of the Data Wunderkind

In order to extract genuine actionable value from banking data, institutions need to pay attention to the emergence of a new breed of Product Manager, or, as I call this rare employee, the ‘Data Wunderkind’. This new genre of data talent combines expertise and skills across six frontiers: big data and analytics, commerce, agile execution, design, digital and customer experience.

A Data Wunderkind bridges the gap between the back office and the frontline by decoding the complex algorithmic output of the data scientist into ‘wow’ experiences for the customer. Using modelling, engineering and development, the Data Wunderkind works closely with various client-facing teams to define and optimise the final customer journey. Whilst this may sound familiar to financial start-ups and adjacent fintech companies, historically, back-office intelligence would not usually filter across to the customer.

Continuous tracking of data intelligence at an individual user level and back into products and experiences is how a legacy corporate businesses can create personalised customer-centric products, on top of re-establishing the lost intimacy and trust between customers and banks.

Here at Absa, a subsidiary of Barclays Africa Group Limited, we’ve seen the benefits of this new breed of data expert through a number of large scale customer pilots that focus on providing tailored and engaging experiences across our overdraft products and credit line limit increases.

Of an initial 422,000 customers who have been part of Absa’s smart predictive SMS alert pilot―warning customers of future spending shortfalls and providing personalised options―more than 66% proactively took action following the alert to manage their payment obligations better. In a follow-up survey, respondents gave a Net Promoter Score* of +80, confirming they had found the personalised SMS service useful. In this case, the leadership and smart execution of the Data Wunderkind resulted in the creation of a ‘wow’ experience for the customer and increased conversion rates by 10x.

The Data Wunderkind and Growth Hacker Partnership

In addition to the Data Wunderkind, the current phenomenon of the Growth Hacker―a smart ‘whiz kid’ who uses creative analytical means to drive user adoption and increase customer retention―has also started to find its way into the banking space.

Absa has introduced this role in South Africa as part of our Data Products and Platforms teams to target the continent and our customer base with special focus on the millennial, who comprise the majority segment of Africa’s population. In partnership with the dynamic capability of the ‘Growth Hacker’, the Data Wunderkind can optimise product adoption across various channels leading to a boom of new data-led innovations.

The Future of Banking and Data

As banks continue to acquire the next generation of data skills from progressive players in the same space or adjacent industries, the winner will be the one who takes best practice and proof of concepts from a lab environment into a streamlined factory delivery mode.

Ultimately the role of big data teams in banks is not only to build infrastructure and platforms, or for data scientists and analysts to churn out models in the background but, rather, to generate tangible pieces of value that find their way to the customer for test, trial and mass launch.

The sooner banks roll out the secret recipe of product management across their data investments via Data Wunderkinds, the faster they will achieve their desired material returns via an increase in product uptake, improved customer satisfaction and higher Net Promoter Scores.

Typical marketing campaigns see an uplift of 2-3% to 10-30% using real time data-driven solutions. However, as per our pilots, by combining real-time data-driven intelligence with the capabilities of Data Wunderkinds and Growth Hackers, success rates can increase by a further 30%.

A true data-driven approach with optimised customer experiences across various user touch points is where banks today can witness the holy grail of connecting with their customers in new and intimate ways. It is the continuous focus on the end user throughout the data product lifecycle which will achieve the ideal benefit that all businesses strive for: A Net Promoter Score greater than 40% and customer satisfaction results greater than 80%.

Banks may not recognise it, but they have an optimistic outlook in the heated race to attract and groom the next generation of rare data talent. Possession of valuable customer and transactional information combined with their tremendous user reach for product launches gives banks a competitive advantage against tech companies and should be used as a magnet to attract the skills and expertise of the Data Wunderkind.

Their acknowledged need and readiness for investment in this new data space has not gone unnoticed. In the fight to attract the best data talent, compared to the likes of prominent tech protagonists such as Google, Netflix, and Amazon, banks offer an unmatched opportunity to lead beginning-to-end product executions which have the potential to touch a customer beyond that of minimal incremental features or functionality enhancements.

Big data has an exciting future within reach for banks, all of whom have an equal chance to join this growth and innovation journey.  However, it all starts with deep focus on attracting the right new data talent to ensure maximised returns from their major digital investments.

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Welcome to world of 2099

The world of 2099 will be unrecognisable from the world of today, but it can be predicted, says one visionary. ARTHUR GOLDSTUCK met him in Singapore.

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Futuristic structures tower over the landscape. Giant, alien-looking trees light up with dazzling colours amid the hundreds of plant species that grow up their trunks. Cosmetic stores sell their wares via public touch-screens, with products delivered instantly in drawers below the screens.

This is not a vision of the future. It is a sample of Singapore today. But it is also an inkling of the world we may all experience in the future.

Singapore was the venue, last week, of the World Cities Summit, where engineers, politicians, investors and visionaries rubbed shoulders as they talked about the strategies and policies that would enhance urban living in the future.

As part of the Summit, global payment technologies leader Mastercard hosted a small media briefing by one of Singapore’s leading thinkers about the future, Dr Damian Tan, managing director of Vickers Venture Partners. The company’s slogan “We invest in the extraordinary,” offers a small clue to Tan’s perspective.

“We look as far forward as 2099 because, as a venture capital firm, we invest in the long term,” he tells a group of journalists from Africa and the Middle East. “Companies explode in growth because there is value in the future. If there is no growth, they won’t explode.”

The big question that the Smart Cities Summit and Mastercard are trying to help answer is, what will cities look like in the year 2099? Tan can’t give an exact answer, but he offers a framework that helps one approach the question.

“If you want to look at 81 years into the future, and understand the change that will come, you need to double that amount and look into the past. That takes us to 1856. The difference between then and now is the difference you can expect between now and 2099.”

Click here or on the page link below to read on: Page 2: Soldiers and Health in 2099.

  •    Arthur Goldstuck is founder of World Wide Worx and editor-in-chief of Gadget.co.za. Follow him on Twitter on @art2gee and on YouTube

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Street art goes electric

Kaspersky Lab and British street artist D*Face have unveiled the first-ever “art helmet” design at the Formula E finale for electric cars in New York.

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The ‘Save The World’ helmets will be raced by DS Virgin Racing’s drivers, Sam Bird and Alex Lynn, as they traverse the New York street circuit during the final races of the Formula E season.

The announcement signals the first art helmet by a Formula E team, continuing the heritage of art in motorsport and the cybersecurity brand’s commitment to contemporary art, creativity and innovation. D*Face took inspiration from Kaspersky Lab’s tagline, “A Company To Save The World”, and hopes that his colourful work will inspire people to take positive action.

D*Face will announce his first-ever art car design with a custom-made livery for the DS Virgin Racing Team. Its design will be released at the “Art Goes Green” event after Saturday’s race. The helmets and art car are the latest installations in the “Save the World” collection, following a major permanent public mural that was installed in Brooklyn, New York, in May.

D*Face, whose real name is Dean Stockton, said: “It is exciting to work with Kaspersky Lab on this project and create art with a real message of hope for a better future. After all, this is our world and we need to look after it. It will take every one of us to make a real lasting, impactful change. I love the mentality of the DS Virgin Racing Team and that of Formula E by showcasing sport in a way that doesn’t harm the environment, but is still just as exhilarating and fun.

“It is time for us all to stand together and make a change… be that stopping data steals, climate change, plastic waste or using damaging fuels. I want everyone to make a pledge to do one thing that will help make a change.”

As a sponsor of DS Virgin Racing Team, Kaspersky Lab is responsible for protecting the team’s devices against cyber threats. The company sees the technical environment in the global sport of Formula E as the next frontier in furthering its research and development of new technologies to keep vehicles secure in the digital world.

Sylvain Filippi, Managing Director at DS Virgin Racing, said: “The whole team fully supports this great initiative and our thanks got to Kaspersky and D*Face for their collaboration. It’s an honour to have such an innovative artist bring his talents to bear in our team ahead of the season-finale; the car, drivers’ crash helmets and mural all look amazing.”

Aldo Fucelli Pessot del Bo, Head of Global Partnerships and Sponsorships at Kaspersky Lab added: “There is a need for innovation on a global scale, both in contemporary art and in the fast-growing sport of Formula E. Now, for the first time ever, Kaspersky Lab is proudly bringing together the two sectors in an effort to Save the World and unleash creativity, encourage freedom of expression and further innovation.”

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