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Device love: how gadgets get in couples’ way

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According to the latest Kaspersky Lab study, there are not only pros of “connected love” but also cons that should be taken into account.

In today’s digital world, it has become commonplace for couples to depend on devices to communicate and stay connected to each other. However, according to the latest Kaspersky Lab study, there are not only pros of “connected love” but also cons that should be taken into account. For example, 55% of couples globally have argued about device overuse, highlighting how although devices often help to bring couples closer together, they can also push them apart and potentially put relationships at risk.

Many people today depend on devices to stay connected with their friends and family, and the same is true for those in relationships. Indeed, couples today frequently use devices and online messaging services to strengthen their relationship: 8-in-10 people always stay in touch with their partner online when they are apart from each other and 62% of people agree that communicating through devices and the internet helps them feel closer to their partner, especially for people who are dating but do not live together (75%).

This digital devotion also extends to shared devices, as 53% of people say their relationship has improved since sharing their online activities, such as accounts and devices. Clearly, there are positives that come from using devices, but there are also some negatives that need to be considered.

The research found that device usage can also lead to arguments between loved ones about a range of device-related issues such as overuse and cybersecurity incidents.

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For example, 51% have argued about a device being used during a meal or face-to-face conversation. In addition, over half (55%) of people have argued with their partner due to too much time being spent on a device, which is higher (58%) for couples that live together, compared to 49% of those who are dating but live separately. This suggests that people don’t like feeling neglected and want their partner’s attention to be on them when they are together.

But excessive device usage isn’t the only thing that couples bicker about. Access to devices is also clearly a source of friction in relationships. A quarter (25%) have argued about whose turn it is to use the device, while forgetting to charge (45%) and losing (28%) devices are also causes of disagreements among couples.

Finally, there are cybersecurity issues to consider. Nearly a quarter (24%) of couples have argued after one person infected the device with malware and 19% have rowed after one partner lost money online by mistake or because of malware. As you would expect, couples that share devices are significantly more likely to argue about the issues mentioned above, highlighting how, when it comes to modern relationships, devices can be foes as well as friends.

“The capabilities of modern devices have created huge opportunities for couples, enabling them to constantly stay connected and build their relationship even when they are not together,” said Dmitry Aleshin, VP for Product Marketing, Kaspersky Lab. “But, there are cons as well as pros to take into account. These same devices which help couples to secure their love when they are apart, can also cause arguments when they are used irresponsibly. By making a conscious effort to take care of their digital lives – including devices, accounts and online activities – and to not neglect their partners in the physical world, people can enjoy the many benefits that the digital world offers without upsetting their other half.”

With people today spending so much time online and cybersecurity risks continuing to become more prevalent, they need to make sure that they are protected from the latest cyberthreats. One way to do this is through tools such as Kaspersky Total Security, which is a multifunctional solution that can protect every part of people’s digital lives and secure several devices at once. This allows couples to communicate with each other without having to worry about being compromised by malware or having their personal data fall into the wrong hands.

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When will we stop calling them phones?

If you don’t remember when phones were only used to talk to people, you may wonder why we still use this term for handsets, writes ARTHUR GOLDSTUCK, on the eve of the 10th birthday of the app.

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Do you remember when handsets were called phones because, well, we used them to phone people?

It took 120 years from the invention of the telephone to the use of phones to send text.

Between Alexander Graham Bell coining the term “telephone” in 1876 and Finland’s two main mobile operators allowing SMS messages between consumers in 1995, only science fiction writers and movie-makers imagined instant communication evolving much beyond voice. Even when BlackBerry shook the business world with email on a phone at the end of the last century, most consumers were adamant they would stick to voice.

It’s hard to imagine today that the smartphone as we know it has been with us for less than 10 years. Apple introduced the iPhone, the world’s first mass-market touchscreen phone, in June 2007, but it is arguable that it was the advent of the app store in July the following year that changed our relationship with phones forever.

That was the moment when the revolution in our hands truly began, when it became possible for a “phone” to carry any service that had previously existed on the World Wide Web.

Today, most activity carried out by most people on their mobile devices would probably follow the order of social media in first place – Facebook, Twitter, Instagram and LinkedIn all jostling for attention – and  instant messaging in close second, thanks to WhatsApp, Messenger, SnapChat and the like. Phone calls – using voice that is – probably don’t even take third place, but play fourth or fifth fiddle to mapping and navigation, driven by Google Maps and Waze, and transport, thanks to Uber, Taxify, and other support services in South Africa like MyCiti,  Admyt and Kaching.

Despite the high cost of data, free public Wi-Fi is also seeing an explosion in use of streaming video – whether Youtube, Netflix, Showmax, or GETblack – and streaming music, particularly with the arrival of Spotify to compete with Simfy Africa.

Who has time for phone calls?

The changing of the phone guard in South Africa was officially signaled last week with the announcement of Vodacom’s annual results. Voice revenue for the 2018 financial year ending 31 March had fallen by 4.6%, to make up 40.6% of Vodacom’s revenue. Total revenue had grown by 8.1%, which meant voice seriously underperformed the group, and had fallen by 4% as a share of revenue, from 2017’s 44.6%.

The reason? Data had not only outperformed the group, increasing revenue by 12.8%, but it had also risen from 39.7% to 42.8% of group revenue,

This means that data has not only outperformed voice for the first time – as had been predicted by World Wide Worx a year ago – but it has also become Vodacom’s biggest contributor to revenue.

That scenario is being played out across all mobile network operators. In the same way, instant messaging began destroying SMS revenues as far back as five years ago – to the extent that SMS barely gets a mention in annual reports.

Data overtaking voice revenues signals the demise of voice as the main service and key selling point of mobile network operators. It also points to mobile phones – let’s call them handsets – shifting their primary focus. Voice quality will remain important, but now more a subset of audio quality rather than of connectivity. Sound quality will become a major differentiator as these devices become primary platforms for movies and music.

Contact management, privacy and security will become critical features as the handset becomes the storage device for one’s entire personal life.

Integration with accessories like smartwatches and activity monitors, earphones and earbuds, virtual home assistants and virtual car assistants, will become central to the functionality of these devices. Why? Because the handsets will control everything else? Hardly.

More likely, these gadgets will become an extension of who we are, what we do and where we are. As a result, they must be context aware, and also context compatible. This means they must hand over appropriate functions to appropriate devices at the appropriate time. 

I need to communicate only using my earpiece? The handset must make it so. I have to use gesture control, and therefore some kind of sensor placed on my glasses, collar or wrist? The handset must instantly surrender its centrality.

There are numerous other scenarios and technology examples, many out of the pages of science fiction, that point to the changing role of the “phone”. The one thing that’s obvious is that it will be silly to call it a phone for much longer.

  • Arthur Goldstuck is founder of World Wide Worx and editor-in-chief of Gadget.co.za. Follow him on Twitter on @art2gee and on YouTube
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MTN 5G test gets 520Mbps

MTN and Huawei have launched Africa’s first 5G field trial with an end-to-end Huawei 5G solution.

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The field trial demonstrated a 5G Fixed-Wireless Access (FWA) use case with Huawei’s 5G 28GHz mmWave Customer Premises Equipment (CPE) in a real-world environment in Hatfield Pretoria, South Africa. Speeds of 520Mbps downlink and 77Mbps uplink were attained throughout respectively.

“These 5G trials provide us with an opportunity to future proof our network and prepare it for the evolution of these new generation networks. We have gleaned invaluable insights about the modifications that we need to do on our core, radio and transmission network from these pilots. It is important to note that the transition to 5G is not just a flick of a switch, but it’s a roadmap that requires technical modifications and network architecture changes to ensure that we meet the standards that this technology requires. We are pleased that we are laying the groundwork that will lead to the full realisation of the boundless opportunities that are inherent in the digital world.” says Babak Fouladi, Group Chief Technology & Information Systems Officer, at MTN Group.

Giovanni Chiarelli, Chief Technology and Information Officer for MTN SA said: “Next generation services such as virtual and augmented reality, ultra-high definition video streaming, and cloud gaming require massive capacity and higher user data rates. The use of millimeter-wave spectrum bands is one of the key 5G enabling technologies to deliver the required capacity and massive data rates required for 5G’s Enhanced Mobile Broadband use cases. MTN and Huawei’s joint field trial of the first 5G mmWave Fixed-Wireless Access solution in Africa will also pave the way for a fixed-wireless access solution that is capable of replacing conventional fixed access technologies, such as fibre.”

“Huawei is continuing to invest heavily in innovative 5G technologies”, said Edward Deng, President of Wireless Network Product Line of Huawei. “5G mmWave technology can achieve unprecedented fiber-like speed for mobile broadband access. This trial has shown the capabilities of 5G technology to deliver exceptional user experience for Enhanced Mobile Broadband applications. With customer-centric innovation in mind, Huawei will continue to partner with MTN to deliver best-in-class advanced wireless solutions.”

“We are excited about the potential the technology will bring as well as the potential advancements we will see in the fields of medicine, entertainment and education. MTN has been investing heavily to further improve our network, with the recent “Best in Test” and MyBroadband best network recognition affirming this. With our focus on providing the South Africans with the best customer experience, speedy allocation of spectrum can help bring more of these technologies to our customers,” says Giovanni.

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