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Decoding tech buzzwords

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Every day, we are bombarded with jargon and buzzwords. Each industry has its fair share of jargon, but none so much as the IT industry, writes DOUG CRAWFORD, Manager of Service Delivery at Entelect.

Sometimes a buzzword emerges out of necessity – there simply is no other way to describe a new phenomenon or trend. In many cases, however, it is a shift in thinking or a reincarnation of an old concept that provides the marketing fraternity with a fresh opportunity to create a ‘buzz’.

Instead of fostering a real understanding, the use of buzzwords and jargon can create misconceptions that ultimately slow down the decision-making process. At best, people waste time trying to understand what is essentially something very simple. At worst, they miss an opportunity. Either way, new terms can be confusing so I have decoded some of the IT industry’s up and coming jargon and buzzwords.

1. Big Data: Big Data refers to the large amounts of data that are typically collected from events triggered by particular actions or devices monitoring some phenomena, often stored in a loosely structured format. Traditional techniques for processing these large data sets are ineffective and new approaches are necessary to collect, retrieve, summarise and visualise – turning the data into something more meaningful.

The generally accepted defining properties of Big Data are known as the Three Vs, which Gartner analyst Doug Laney originally coined:

·         Volume – the amount of data stored

·         Velocity – the rate at which data is generated and processed

·         Variety – the type and source of the data.

If each of these properties is increasing significantly, the information can be considered to be Big Data.

Aside from the fact that companies are collecting vast amounts of information on customers’ movements, behaviours and buying habits, why is Big Data important from a business perspective?

The old adage of ‘knowledge is power’ holds true. The more equipped people are to make decisions, the better the outcome for their business. What is relevant in the case of Big Data however, is making sense of the information (separating the noise from the meaningful), the timing of the information, and how to use the information effectively to improve a product or service.

The current movement in Big Data aims to address these issues and is reshaping our understanding of how to process information on a much larger scale.

2. Prescriptive Analytics: Making sense of the information leads us to the field of data analytics – the tools and techniques that are used to extract meaning from huge volumes of data. Analytics efforts can be broadly classified into one of three main categories – descriptive, predictive and prescriptive.

Descriptive analytics, tells us what has happened and possibly why it has happened. It usually involves reporting on historical data to provide insights into various business metrics. Predictive analytics attempts to tell us what may happen in the future, taking historical data into account and applying algorithms and various statistical models to predict the future.

Prescriptive analytics, the third and most recent focus area of data analytics, takes it to the next level by recommending a course of action and presenting the likely outcomes of choosing such action, incorporating any constraints of the current environment (financial or regulatory, for example). An actual person still has to make the decisions but prescriptive analytics can provide valuable input into scenario planning and optimisation exercises, by combining business rules, statistical models and machine learning to quantify the impact of future decisions.

There is a variety of organisations that have invested significant effort in descriptive analytics and reporting solutions to provide insight into historical data, and many are starting to explore the opportunities that predictive analytics has to offer. Both are necessary precursors to prescriptive analytics, which requires, at a minimum, the capability to capture and summarise large data sets efficiently. The data can then be used as input to prescriptive analytic engines.

3. Software-defined infrastructure (SDI): Software-defined infrastructure builds on the capabilities of virtualisation and cloud-based services to define IT infrastructure requirements. These requirements include computing power, as well as network and storage capacity, at the software level. SDI allows application developers to describe their expectations of infrastructure in a standard and systematic way, turning computing resources into logical components that can be provisioned on the fly without human intervention.

Take today’s scenario of having to configure each element of infrastructure to support an application – machines and images, storage and mount points, firewalls and load balancers to name a few – and replace it with the simple action of identifying an SDI-enabled data centre and clicking ‘deploy’. Each resource is automatically configured as required and, more importantly, can reconfigure itself as the application and usage changes.

Defining these requirements based on policies and expected usage patterns at the software level, and incorporating them into the deployable artefacts, means that IT organisations can respond more quickly to peaks and troughs in throughput, and achieve repeatable and reliable application deployments by automating many infrastructure related activities.

Furthermore, SDI-enabled data centres can optimise resource usage, which will drive down the cost of infrastructure. Specialists can focus on optimising specific elements of the infrastructure, such as network or storage, rather than reactively wiring and rewiring configurations to support evolving application requirements.

As was the case with Java and the standardised API’s (Application Programming Interfaces) that make up the Java Enterprise Edition framework, SDI will require a concerted effort to ensure inter-operability between the tools, platforms and processes that make up the virtual data centres of the future. As with cloud services, there is a vendor battle brewing to capture the lion’s share of what is likely to be a significant market for SDI-capable services. Those vendors who actively drive and support open interfaces and API’s will have the advantage in the long term.

4. DevOps: The term DevOps has been around for some time now, and the concept even longer. However, only in recent years has it started gaining widespread acceptance as standard practice in the development communities.

DevOps is to development and operations teams as Agile is to development teams and business. Where the Agile movement promotes increased collaboration between development teams and business users, DevOps looks at integrating operations activities much earlier and more tightly into the software-development life cycle. Both have the same goal of enabling software projects to respond more effectively to change.

In reality, DevOps is an extension of Agile as we know it today. However, it includes operations and support functions. The authors of the Agile Manifesto certainly never explicitly excluded operations and support from their widely accepted list of values and principles but in the experience of many, the focus on Agile projects has always been biased towards improving the collaboration between business users and the development team, rather than the development team and the operations team.

Yes, it is true that the operations team is implicitly included in the concept of cross-functional development teams (see below), but, in reality, IT operations in many organisations are still very much an isolated function, which is exactly the barrier that DevOps is trying to eliminate.

5. Cross-functional teams: The concept of a cross-functional team is simple. The development team has all the skills necessary to deliver a piece of working software into production, which may include activities such as user experience design, database design, server configuration and, of course, writing code. Where product development teams are concerned, businesses adopting Agile practices should be assembling cross-functional teams.

This is not an excuse for hiring fewer individuals and expecting them to be Jacks of all trades: specialisation is important and a necessity when solving complex problems that require focus and experience. By having a single, co-located team that can take something from concept to reality eliminates external dependencies that plague many software development teams of today, especially in large organisations.

Aside from efficiency and knowledge sharing, the argument for isolated teams defined by skill or technology is the degree of control of standards and governance within a particular domain. This argument is valid, but only for operational and ‘commoditised’ services such as desktop support and hardware infrastructure. As soon as product development enters the mix, the effectiveness of the team becomes more important than the efficiency of the team. Assuming differentiation is one of the main objectives, product development teams should be optimised for effectiveness rather than efficiency, since development in this scenario is a creative process, one that should not be constrained by red tape and corporate IT governance.

If companies want to increase their chances of creating a product that delights their customers, they should include specialists and designers in the team as full-time members until their services are no longer deemed critical, which will probably only be after several production releases. If you want to minimise your IT costs at the expense of rapid innovation, create a dedicated team that out-sources its services to several internal development teams.

While the occurrence of new ‘buzzwords’ in the ICT space is on-going, it is crucial that decision makers ensure a practical and simplified understanding before making any kind of investment on behalf of their organisation. Often designed to excite and compel, these buzzwords often do not describe the actual function or benefits of a particular concept.

We encourage business leaders to screen potential IT suppliers not by the terminology and complicated jargon they offer, but rather by how simply and understandably, they are able to communicate their solutions.

Cars

Auto rivals team up for connected car demo

Rivals BMW, Ford and Groupe PSA, maker of Peugeot and Opel cars, have teamed up with the 5G Automotive Association (5GAA), Qualcomm Technologies and Savari for Europe’s first live demonstration of C-V2X direct communication technology operating across vehicles from multiple auto manufacturers.

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The live demonstration also featured a live showcase of C-V2X direct communication technology operating between passenger cars, motorcycles, and roadside infrastructure. C-V2X is a global solution for vehicle-to-everything (V2X) communication in support of improved automotive safety, automated driving and traffic efficiency.

The demonstration exhibited the road safety and traffic efficiency benefits of using C-V2X for Vehicle-to-Vehicle (V2V) collision avoidance, as well as Vehicle-to-Infrastructure (V2I) connectivity to traffic signals and Traffic Management Centers (TMC). C-V2X was operated using real-time direct communications over ITS spectrum and demonstrated its ability to work without cellular network coverage, and underscores its commercial readiness for industry deployment as early as 2020. Superior performance and cost-effectiveness compared to other V2X technologies, along with forward-compatibility with 5G, make C-V2X direct communications a preferred solution for C-ITS applications.

Six demonstrations were shown including: Emergency Electronic Brake Light, Intersection Collision Warning, Across Traffic Turn Collision Risk Warning, Slow Vehicle Warning and Stationary Vehicle Warning, Signal Phase and Timing / Signal Violation Warning and Vulnerable Road User (pedestrian) Warning. The vehicles involved included two-wheel e-scooters provided by BMW Group, and automotive passenger vehicles provided by Ford, Groupe PSA, and BMW Group, all of which were equipped with C-V2X direct communication technology using the Qualcomm® 9150 C-V2X chipset solution.  V2X software stack and application software, along with roadside infrastructure, were provided by industry leader, Savari.

C-V2X is globally supported by a broad automotive ecosystem, which includes the fast growing 5GAA organization.  The 5GAA involves over 85 global members comprised of many leading automakers, Tier-1 suppliers, software developers, mobile operators, semiconductor companies, test equipment vendors, telecom suppliers, traffic signal suppliers and road operators.  

Cellular modems will be key to the C-V2X deployment in vehicles to support telematics, eCall, connected infotainment and delivering useful driving/traffic/parking information. As C-V2X direct communication functionality is integrated into the cellular modem, C-V2X solutions are expected to be more cost-efficient and economical over competing technologies, and benefit from accelerated attach rates.  C-V2X direct communication field validations are currently underway in Germany, France, Korea, China, Japan and the U.S.

C-V2X currently stands as the only V2X technology based on globally recognized 3rd Generation Partnership Project (3GPP) specifications, with ongoing evolution designed to offer forward compatibility with 5G.  C-V2X also leverages and reuses the upper layer protocols defined by the automotive industry, including the European Telecommunications Standards Institute (ETSI) organization. C-V2X includes two complementary transmission modes: 

  • Direct communication as shown in this demonstration for V2V and V2I use cases
  • V2N network communication, which leverages mobile operators for connectivity and delivers cloud-based services, including automated crash notification (ACN, as mandated by eCall), hazard warnings, weather conditions, green light optimal speed advisory (GLOSA), parking spot location, and remote tele-operation to support automated driving, to name a few.

“This demonstration builds on the successful C-V2X showcase we organised with our members Audi, Ford and Qualcomm in Washington DC in April, said Christoph Voigt, Chairman of 5GAA.

“We are excited to witness the growing momentum behind this life-saving technology and to see our members working together to deploy C-V2X, and to make it hit the road as soon as possible.”  

“The BMW Group introduced the first C-ITS use cases already in 2013 with the market introduction of the BMW i3. Today most of envisaged C-ITS use-cases are already institutionalized. With the implementation of C-V2X, the BMW Group accomplishes the last set of the puzzle with a practical path to C-ITS showing quick benefits,” said Christoph Grote, Senior Vice President Electronics, BMW Group. 

“With its ability to safely and securely connect vehicles, along with its evolution into 5G, C-V2X is integral to Ford’s vision for future transportation in which all cars and infrastructure talk to each other,” said Thomas Lukaszewicz, Manager Automated Driving, Ford of Europe. “We are very encouraged by preliminary test results in Europe and elsewhere which support our belief that C-V2X direct communications has superior V2X communication capabilities.”

“We’re moving forward with seamless communication between cars and their environment for enhancing road safety, as well as our customers’ safety,” said Carla Gohin, Group PSA’s Vice President for Research and Advanced Engineering. “Following the first European C-V2X direct communications demonstration we hosted with Qualcomm Technologies last March, we’re pleased to work with leading automotive and technology companies today to highlight that C-V2X interoperability is a reality.” 

“This demonstration of interoperability between multiple automakers is not only another milestone achieved towards C-V2X deployment, but also further validates the commercial viability and global compatibility of C-V2X direct communications for connected vehicles,” said Enrico Salvatori, senior vice president & president, Qualcomm Europe and MEA. “We look forward in continuing to work alongside leaders in the automotive industry, like the 5GAA, BMW Group, Ford, Groupe PSA and Savari, to help advance the automotive industry’s shift towards a safer, connected and more autonomous future.” 

“As one of the V2X pioneers, our company is extremely pleased to continue to help enable the next step in the V2X revolution that we helped start back in 2008,” said Ravi Puvvala, CEO of Savari. “For the last year and a half, the Savari team has worked diligently alongside the dedicated C-V2X engineers in the 5GAA partnership. The resulting string of increasingly impressive demonstrations is continuing to convince the world that C-V2X will soon be deployed around the world.”

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Win a Poster Heater with Gadget and Takealot.com

This winter Gadget and Takealot.com are giving away three Poster Heaters, which look like posters but become heaters when you plug them in.

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Three Gadget readers will each win a unit, valued at R550 each. To enter, follow @GadgetZA and @Takealot on Twitter and tell us on the @GadgetZA account how many Watts the heater consumes.

What’s the big deal about these heaters? Many of us are struggling to keep the balance between soaring electricity costs and the need to keep warm this winter.

However, the recently launched Poster Heater by EasyHeat and distributed in South Africa by Takealot.com is not only one of the most cost effective electric heaters currently on the market, it is also easy to setup and use.

As the name indicates, it is a poster similar to one you would hang on a wall. But, plug it in and it turns into a 300 Watt heater. The Poster Heater isn’t designed to heat hallways or large rooms, but rather smaller ones like a bedroom or a baby’s nursery or a dressing room.

It uses radiant heating, which means that it heats up in a couple of minutes and the heat is directed at the objects or people around it, quickly taking the chill out of the air and providing a comfortable ambient temperature.

The other advantage of radiant heating is that it doesn’t dry out the air like infrared or gas heaters. Users also don’t have to worry about their children or pets getting too close to it because, even though it gets hot, it can be touched.

To enter the competition follow the steps below:

Competition entry details:

1. Follow @GadgetZA and @Takealot on Twitter. (We will ONLY be accepting entires via Twitter, so please don’t enter through the comments section of this article.)

2. Tell us on Twitter, via @GadgetZA, mentioning @Takealot in your posting, how many Watts the Poster Heater consumes.

cleardot.gif3. The competition closes on 31 July 2018.

4. Winners will be notified via Twitter on 1 August and Takealot.com will be in touch to organise delivery.

5. The competition is only open to South African residents.

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