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PoPI Act vs Cloud

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As companies begin to move more and more data to the cloud, GRAHAM CROOCK, Director: IT audit, risk and cyber lab at BDO SA, asks what it means for data sensitivity and customer protection?

Fundamentally, the power of computing is moving to the cloud. Powerful, bulky machines will be rendered unnecessary as data starts getting accessed through the even more powerful infrastructure built around the incredible processing power that now lives on the cloud. More and more companies are moving their data to the cloud, as well as government agencies and institutions. But what does this mean for data sensitivity and customer protection?

Many businesses are reluctant to move their essential data to the cloud, which is becoming more and more accessible as technology converges, and companies run the risk of being left behind by their competitors. However, company leaders want guarantees that their cloud service provider cannot, for example, be targeted by terrorist groups or rival organisations.

So the question is, how do we deal with disaster recovery if cybercriminals attack or shut down one of the big data center servers that houses companies’ invaluable data? Can companies really be sure that they have efficient redundancy built into the business? Companies need to cover all their bases when looking to migrate their data onto the cloud. Demands such as zero% downtime and ad hoc changes to the architecture of the cloud infrastructure are conversations that need to be had by cloud servers and companies. It will be the tech savvy and innovative companies that will lead the pack, ensuring that they have a solid service level agreement (SLA) in place that protects themselves, their clients, and is in accordance to legislation.

But realistically speaking, the law is not keeping up. What are the penalties for companies losing vital data? Who will be held accountable should things go wrong? How will the client or company be compensated? These questions are still not properly addressed by South African legislation, and lawyers need to become tech savvy in this new era, to ensure that SLAs are ironclad. This is where the PoPI Act comes into play.

The purpose of the PoPI Act is to ensure that South African companies conduct the requirements of the act responsibly when it comes to collecting, processing, storing and sharing personal information of another body or individual by holding them accountable should they compromise a third party’s personal information. Within the PoPI Act, certain rights of protection are awarded to third parties who share their personal information with organisations. Some of these include:

  1. Consent as to when and how one chooses to share their information
  2. The type and extent of information one choose to share
  3. Transparency on how one’s data will be used
  4. Immediate notification should one’s data is compromised
  5. Allowing one to have access to their own information, and do with it as they pleas
  6. The prevention of unauthorised people accessing one’s information
  7. How and where one’s information is stored
  8. The accuracy of one’s information

The seventh point highlights the challenge that companies storing information on a cloud have. More often than not, organisations don’t actually know where the cloud is and who has access to this information.

It is important to note that while consumers now have more rights and protection, companies are also considered responsible parties and have the same obligation to protect other parties’ personal information. This includes all stakeholders such as employees, suppliers, vendors and even service providers. But in today’s day and age, people freely disseminate personal information about themselves on the internet, and it is important to remember that the PoPI Act cannot protect you if you do not protect yourself. The onus is on everyone handling delicate data to treat it as such.

When it comes to hiring a cloud server for your delicate information, ensure to chat to your risk advisor or specialist companies like BDO that will ensure that your migration is smooth and secure, and of course, that your cloud service provider is compliant to the PoPI Act.

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Huawei Mate 20 unveils ‘higher intelligence’

The new Mate 20 series, launching in South Africa today, includes a 7.2″ handset, and promises improved AI.

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Huawei Consumer Business Group today launches the Huawei Mate 20 Series in South Africa.

The phones are powered by Huawei’s densest and highest performing system on chip (SoC) to date, the Kirin 980. Manufactured with the 7nm process, incorporating the Cortex-A76-based CPU and Mali-G76 GPU, the SoC offers improved performance and, according to Huawei, “an unprecedented smooth user experience”.

The new 40W Huawei SuperCharge, 15W Huawei Wireless Quick Charge, and large batteries work in tandem to provide users with improved battery life. A Matrix Camera System includes a  Leica Ultra Wide Angle Lens that lets users see both wider and closer, with a new macro distance capability. The camera system adopts a Four-Point Design that gives the device a distinct visual identity.

The Mate 20 Series is available in 6.53-inch, 6.39-inch and 7.2-inch sizes, across four devices: Huawei Mate 20, Mate 20 Pro, Mate 20 X and Porsche Design Huawei Mate 20 RS. They ship with the customisable Android P-based EMUI 9 operating system.

“Smartphones are an important entrance to the digital world,” said Richard Yu, CEO of Huawei Consumer BG, at the global launch in London last week. “The Huawei Mate 20 Series is designed to be the best ‘mate’ of consumers, accompanying and empowering them to enjoy a richer, more fulfilled life with their higher intelligence, unparalleled battery lives and powerful camera performance.”

The SoC fits 6.9 billion transistors within a die the size of a fingernail. Compared to Kirin 970, the latest chipset is equipped with a CPU that is claimed to be 75 percent more powerful, a GPU that is 46 percent more powerful and an NPU (neural processing unit) that is 226 percent more powerful. The efficiency of the components has also been elevated: the CPU is claimed to be 58 percent more efficient, the GPU 178 percent more efficient, and the NPU 182 percent more efficient. The Kirin 980 is the world’s first commercial SoC to use the Cortex-A76-based cores.

Huawei has designed a three-tier architecture that consists of two ultra-large cores, two large cores and four small cores. This allows the CPU to allocate the optimal amount of resources to heavy, medium and light tasks for greater efficiency, improving the performance of the SoC while enhancing battery life. The Kirin 980 is also the industry’s first SoC to be equipped with Dual-NPU, giving it higher On-Device AI processing capability to support AI applications.

Read more about the Mate 20 Pro’s connectivity, battery and camera on the next page. 

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How Quantum computing will change … everything?

Research labs, government agencies (NASA) and tech giants like Microsoft, IBM and Google are all focused on developing quantum theories first put forward in the 1970s. What’s more, a growing start-up quantum computing ecosystem is attracting hundreds of millions of investor dollars. Given this scenario, Forrester believes it is time for IT leaders to pay attention.

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“We expect CIOs in life sciences, energy, defence, and manufacturing to see a deluge of hype from vendors and the media in the coming months,” says Forrester’s Brian Hopkins, VP, principal analyst serving CIOs and lead author of a report: A First Look at Quantum Computing. “Financial services, supply-chain, and healthcare firms will feel some of this as well. We see a market emerging, media interest on the rise, and client interest trickling in. It’s time for CIOs to take notice.”

The Forrester report gives some practical applications for quantum computing which helps contextualise its potential: 

  • Security could massively benefit from quantum computing. Factoring very large integers could break RSA-encrypted data, but could also be used to protect systems against malicious attempts. 
  • Supply chain managers could use quantum computing to gather and act on price information using minute-by-minute fluctuations in supply and demand 
  • Robotics engineers could determine the best parameters to use in deep-learning models that recognise and react to objects in computer vision
  • Quantum computing could be used to discover revolutionary new molecules making use of the petabytes of data that studies are now producing. This would significantly benefit many organisations in the material and life sciences verticals – particularly those trying to create more cost-effective electric car batteries which still depend on expensive and rare materials. 

Continue reading to find out how Quantum computing differs.

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