Connect with us

Movie of the Week

Lionheart: A Nigerian Netflix Original

Netflix’s first Nigerian film is special, not only as an African film on a large international platform, but also as the first film that Genevieve Nnaji has directed. Nnaji who has over 100 movies under her belt, also stars in “Lionheart” as the film’s protagonist, Adaeze. Netflix acquired the film a day before it screened for the first time, at the Toronto International Film Festival on 7 September 2018. Overall, it can be described as a dramedy (drama-comedy) with family-friendly moments of comedy when characters attempt to overcome hardships.

Click through to watch the trailer and to read more about the movie.

Published

on

Running a company can be challenging, especially if you are a female in a male-dominated industry. Looking to prove her worth, Adaeze (Genevieve Nnaji) steps up to the challenge when her father, Chief Ernest Obiagu (Pete Edochie), is forced to take a step back due to health issues. Ironically, he appoints her crude and eccentric uncle, Godswill (Nkem Owoh), to run the company with Adaeze. Complications arise when they discover that the family business is in dire financial straits and both Adaeze and Godswill try to save the company in their own way to crazy and often hilarious results.

The movie can be streamed on Netflix here.

Movie of the Week

Dolemite Is My Name – A Netflix Original

Stung by a string of showbiz failures, floundering comedian Rudy Ray Moore (Eddie Murphy) has an epiphany that turns him into a word-of-mouth sensation: step onstage as someone else.

Click below to watch the trailer and to read more about the movie.

Published

on

Borrowing from the street mythology of 1970s Los Angeles, Moore assumes the persona of Dolemite, a pimp with a cane and an arsenal of obscene fables. However, his ambitions exceed selling bootleg records deemed too racy for mainstream radio stations to play. Moore convinces a social justice-minded dramatist (Keegan-Michael Key) to write his alter ego a film, incorporating kung fu, car chases, and Lady Reed (Da’Vine Joy Randolph), an ex-backup singer who becomes his unexpected comedic foil. Despite clashing with his pretentious director, D’Urville Martin (Wesley Snipes), and countless production hurdles at their studio in the dilapidated Dunbar Hotel, Moore’s Dolemite becomes a runaway box office smash and a defining movie of the Blaxploitation era.

Comics and rappers have praised Moore as a pioneering influence over the past few decades, and Dolemite Is My Name is a celebration of a singular talent who made his own legend. From director Craig Brewer (Hustle & Flow, Empire); Emmy and Golden Globe-winning writers Scott Alexander and Larry Karaszewski (Ed Wood, The People vs. O.J. Simpson); and the producing team of Oscar and Golden Globe nominee John Davis (Ferdinand, Joy), Golden Globe nominee John Fox (Joy) and Eddie Murphy. 
The film features an all-star supporting cast — including Mike Epps, Craig Robinson, Tituss Burgess, Kodi Smit-McPhee, Snoop Dogg, Ron Cephas Jones, Barry Shabaka Henley, Tip ‘TI’ Harris, Luenell, Tasha Smith — plus costumes designed by Academy Award winner Ruth E. Carter (Black Panther). 

The film is available to stream now on Netflix.

Continue Reading

Movie of the Week

Kanarie – Now streaming on Showmax

Schalk Bezuidenhout’s breakout movie, Kanarie, is now streaming first on Showmax in South Africa.

Click below to watch the trailer and to read more about the film.

Published

on

Schalk Bezuidenhout stars as Johan Niemand, a fashion-loving gay teen in small-town South Africa in 1985, a time of apartheid, religious conservatism and war, an era when not even his idol Boy George had dared to come out publicly as gay yet. 

When Johan is called up to serve his compulsory two-year military training, he escapes the border war by joining The South African Defence Force Church Choir and Concert Group, known as Die Kanaries (The Canaries), where he discovers his true self through hardship, camaraderie, first love and the liberating freedom of music. 

The film was the 10th most popular South African movie at the box office last year.

Bezuidenhout is one of South Africa’s top comedians: the winner of two Comics’ Choice Awards, described by Skhumba recently as “the one white comedian loved by black people.” 

On the basis of his performance in Kanarie, acting might still be his true calling, as much as we hope we still get to laugh with him often on stage. The Los Angeles Times compared him to the legendary Buster Keaton while praising his “clear talent for drama” and the way he “superbly juggles Johan’s many moods and modes,” while FilmThreat raved about his “confident, raw performance.” 

It has a 100% critics rating on Rotten Tomatoes; a 7.9 rating on IMDB; and has won 15 awards around the world. As The Los Angeles Times put it, “Kanarie ably hits the high notes… rich, poignant and finely observed…”. Similarly, Indiewire picked it as one of seven films to watch at Outfest, North America’s premier LGBTI festival, calling it a “surprisingly fun” musical about “the effects of nationalism on a tender soul, and the bond of brotherhood among misfits.” 

So whether or not you’re gay, or Afrikaans, or want to support proudly South African products, Kanarie is the film for you, next time you’re in the mood for an uplifting musical love story about finding individuality in a world of oppression and uniformity. Watch it first on Showmax here.

Continue Reading

Trending

Copyright © 2019 World Wide Worx