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Why children are driving touch screen sales

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One of Lenovo’s biggest growth segments is in the eight to 12-year-old segment and this has to do with children’s demand for touch devices. GRAHAM BRAUM, General Manager of Lenovo Africa explores why children are so drawn to these devices.

Renowned educator, Maria Montessori once said, “The hands are the instruments of a man’s intelligence.” Given that she lived around the turn of the 20th Century, it’s safe to assume she wasn’t referring to using one’s hands as the instruments with which to operate touch screens. However, as touch technology becomes increasingly ubiquitous in our lives, and even more so in the lives of our children, it is worth exploring why children are so drawn to it and the impact it has on their intelligence – both academic and social – as well as their safety.

At Lenovo, one of our biggest growth has been among the eight to 12-year-old segment and I believe this is driven by children’s demand for touch screens. Michael Cohen of UK research consultancy, the Michael Cohen Group says the rise of the touch screen has been incredible – the most rapid introduction of a technology he has witnessed. His research found that in the UK more than two thirds of children live in homes with smartphones, and just over half have access to tablets. They also increasingly have their own device. Of course, African figures are likely to differ slightly, but given the significant mobile penetration and the constant development of affordable technology across the continent, it makes sense that we will follow this trend.

The question is why children are so drawn to this technology. Besides that as digital natives they incorporate digital technologies into their lives with ease, the answer is that touch screens in particular are intuitive. Using a mouse or a remote control is a symbolic action and young children might need to be shown the connection between what they are doing with their hands and what is happening on the screen. A touch screen makes this connection obvious – a gesture results in logical action; swipe to the right and whatever is on the screen moves in the same direction.

The ease with which children use touch screens means they enjoy a variety of online activities, from watching videos and playing games, to searching for information, doing their homework and socialising. A study by the London School of Economics and Political Science quotes research which found that apart from the obvious enjoyment children experience will partaking in these activities, this engagement also helps to develop digital literacy, as well as support future academic achievement and social interaction.

Of course, there is some trepidation among parents related to their children’s lack of skills to assess the risk associated with interacting online, and what they may be exposed to. There is also the fear that children may become addicted to the virtual worlds they interact with, impacting on how they function as part of a family, with their peers or in broader society.

However, authors of “Tech-Savvy Parenting”, Nikki Bush and Arthur Goldstuck believe that these risks can be curbed by active parenting, which starts by learning about the technology your children are using and how to keep them safe. It also involves thinking about how to assimilate this technology into family life while keeping the family at the centre. She suggests that technology shouldn’t be an alternative to family time, but is instead a useful tool to up skill our children to be resourceful and resilient in the future.

There is no denying that children’s lives are filled with media and technology at younger and younger ages and the uptake is rapidly increasing. The growth of the eight- to 12-year-old segment in our business is evident of that. With this in mind, it makes sense to think about what technology like touch screens can offer them and how to mediate screen time not to cut it down as much as leverage its benefits.

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Win a Poster Heater with Gadget and Takealot.com

This winter Gadget and Takealot.com are giving away three Poster Heaters, which look like posters but become heaters when you plug them in.

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Three Gadget readers will each win a unit, valued at R550 each. To enter, follow @GadgetZA and @Takealot on Twitter and tell us on the @GadgetZA account how many Watts the heater consumes.

What’s the big deal about these heaters? Many of us are struggling to keep the balance between soaring electricity costs and the need to keep warm this winter.

However, the recently launched Poster Heater by EasyHeat and distributed in South Africa by Takealot.com is not only one of the most cost effective electric heaters currently on the market, it is also easy to setup and use.

As the name indicates, it is a poster similar to one you would hang on a wall. But, plug it in and it turns into a 300 Watt heater. The Poster Heater isn’t designed to heat hallways or large rooms, but rather smaller ones like a bedroom or a baby’s nursery or a dressing room.

It uses radiant heating, which means that it heats up in a couple of minutes and the heat is directed at the objects or people around it, quickly taking the chill out of the air and providing a comfortable ambient temperature.

The other advantage of radiant heating is that it doesn’t dry out the air like infrared or gas heaters. Users also don’t have to worry about their children or pets getting too close to it because, even though it gets hot, it can be touched.

To enter the competition follow the steps below:

Competition entry details:

1. Follow @GadgetZA and @Takealot on Twitter. (We will ONLY be accepting entries via Twitter, so please don’t enter through the comments section of this article.)

2. Tell us on Twitter, via @GadgetZA, mentioning @Takealot in your posting, how many Watts the Poster Heater consumes.

cleardot.gif3. The competition closes on 31 July 2018.

4. Winners will be notified via Twitter on 1 August and Takealot.com will be in touch to organise delivery.

5. The competition is only open to South African residents.

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Happy Emoji Day! Here’s 10 reasons to be cheerful

First created by Shigetaka Kurita in 1999, the emoji has become a huge part of everyday communication. Whether you love them or hate them, flying dollar bills, applauding hands and rolling eyes are here to stay.

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Scientist suggest that the use of emojis will help us gain the same satisfaction from digital interactions as we enjoy from personal contact.

Almost two decades later, and we have over 2600 unique emojis to perfectly express what we feel, thank you Mr Kurita! Join HMD, the home of Nokia phones as we celebrate World Emoji Day on the 17th of July with these interesting emoji facts:

The most popular emoji used is “Person Shrugging”

1.       The Nokia 3310 was chosen as one of the first 3 “National” emojis for Finland… it represents unbreakable!

2.       South Africa’s favourite emoji is the “Kiss and wink”… how sweet SA!

3.       French is the only language where a ‘smiley’ does not top the list for its use

4.       On average, over 60 billion emojis are sent on Facebook every day

5.       For the first time ever, the Oxford Dictionaries Word of the Year was a pictograph! The “Face with Tears of Joy” was crowned word of the year in 2015

6.       According to Emojipedia, some of the most requested emoji’s include afro, a bagel and hands making a heart

7.       To include all races, a diversity pack was released in 2017

8.       It has become so trendy that the Museum of Modern Art displays the original emoji collection on canvas

9.       In 2009, Herman Melville’s classic Moby Dick was completely translated into emoji’s

 

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