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Canon unveils new EOS 80D

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Canon has introduced the EOS 80D DSLR. The camera features a 24.2 megapixel CMOS sensor and uses DIGIC 6 processor.

Canon has introduced the EOS 80D – a powerful, fully equipped DSLR – in South Africa. The company says it’s ideal for enthusiasts who love experimenting with different genres and styles, since the camera is highly customisable and shoots with exceptional speed and ease, making it a versatile camera for capturing striking stills and Full HD movies. It includes a new 24.2 megapixel CMOS sensor and DIGIC 6 processor, alongside a new 45 all cross-type point AF system and fast responsive 7 fps shooting rate.

Canon is also unveiling an all-purpose lens – the EF-S 18-135mm f/3.5-5.6 IS USM – with new Nano USM technology, and an optional Power Zoom Adapter PZ-E1, for smooth zoom control when shooting movies and remote operation via Wi-Fi.

Canon provided the following information:

Whatever subject you’re looking to explore – from sports, to wildlife, or action – the EOS 80D is extremely responsive, excelling in capturing everything in incredible, intricate detail. The new sensor provides stunning clarity and the freedom to crop in, while the new 45 all cross-type point AF system and 7 fps shooting can freeze action with ultimate precision. For pin-point focusing or wide-area tracking, the AF points are individually selectable or grouped into areas, giving you greater control over composition regardless of where your subject is in the frame. When using lens combinations with narrow apertures, 27 f/8 compatible AF points offer focus, in even the most extreme situations.

Designed to shoot in varying light conditions, the camera has a native ISO 100-16,000 range, expandable to ISO 25,600, and the AF system will continue to work even under moonlight (-3EV).

The 7560-pixel RGB+IR metering sensor measures both visible light and invisible infra-red light, giving accurate exposures, while Flicker Detection ensures consistent exposure when shooting under flickering artificial lights. A new White Priority setting also helps you to reduce the appearance of warmer tones.

A camera that adapts to you

The EOS 80D has been meticulously crafted to provide photographers with everything they need. The instinctiveness of the camera’s design means you can easily customise your shooting experience, with conveniently-placed controls giving you access to the most commonly used modes and settings. The Intelligent Viewfinder displays 100% of the frame, as well as the current settings – you can also quickly switch to the 7.7cm (3.0”) Vari-angle Clear View LCD II Touch screen, ideal for movie shooting, Live View mode, or accessing functions quickly.

Become the videographer you aspire to be

Whether you’re creating a travel vlog, or cinematic-style movie, the EOS 80D offers total flexibility with Full HD movie shooting. Achieving accurate auto focus and smooth focus tracking is effortless thanks to Canon’s unique Dual Pixel CMOS AF technology. Both AF speed and AF tracking sensitivity can also be easily adjusted, giving you complete control over the pace and responsiveness of the AF to suit the style of your movie.

Serious videographers can be confident footage will achieve a professional looking result, with the ability to shoot at 60p in MP4 format – perfect for slowing down the action while still controlling focus. The EOS 80D includes both headphone and microphone inputs, allowing you to capture and have full control over audio during a shoot.

Easily connect, shoot remotely and share your work

Enjoy the freedom of remote shooting via your smartphone or tablet using the EOS 80D with Canon’s Camera Connect app. Built-in Wi-Fi and Dynamic NFC connectivity makes it simple to connect with and share full resolution JPEGs to your smart device. You can also connect to and control your camera via a PC, without the need for a home Wi-Fi router, and quickly and easily save, view and share your photos and movies all from one single accessible location using Canon’s Connect Station CS100.

Shoot stunning stills and movies with the EF-S 18-135mm f/3.5-5.6 IS USM and Power Zoom Adapter PZ-E1

To match the versatility of EOS 80D, Canon’s new EF-S 18-135mm f/3.5-5.6 IS USM provides high performance auto-focus for movies and stills with the focal range to shoot wide, or up close, within a single lens. The EF-S 18-135mm f/3.5-5.6 IS USM is the first of Canon’s lenses to feature Nano USM focus technology – delivering smooth, quiet AF for movies and blistering speed for stills. The new Power Zoom Adapter PZ-E1 is a compact and lightweight accessory designed for the EF-S 18-135mm f/3.5-5.6 IS USM to enable smooth, fingertip zoom control when shooting movies, ideal for capturing professional-looking documentary footage, with the option to control via Wi-Fi.

EOS 80D key features:

·       A responsive camera to keep pace with the action

·       Stunning photo and movie quality in a wide range of conditions

·       Everything you need to develop your photography

·       Perfect for creative videography

·       Easily connect, shoot and share your images and movies

EF-S 18-135mm f/3.5-5.6 IS USM key features:

·       Versatile focal range to capture a wide range of subjects

·       Nano USM for fast AF for photos and smooth, quiet movie AF

·       Pin sharp photos with 4-stop optical Image Stabilizer

·       Record rock steady movie footage with Dynamic IS

·       Compact, high performance lens with optional power zoom accessory

Power Zoom Adapter PZ-E1 key features:

·       Compact and portable Power Zoom Adapter

·       High quality smooth zoom when shooting movies

·       Ideal for dramatic news and documentary shooting

·       Wi-Fi remote control of zoom via Canon Camera Connect app

·       Easily adjustable zoom speed for optimum control

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Showmax launches in Nigeria

Basketmouth and Bovi are the hosts of an exclusive Big Brother Naija recap show, Big Brother Naija Hot Room, as Showmax launches in Nigeria.

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Showmax has launched its video-on-demand service in Nigeria. The video streaming service features a dedicated slate of Nigerian TV shows and movies, international hit series, Hollywood blockbusters, and a Big Brother Naija partnership with live streaming and exclusive new BBNaija shows.

The launch brings two important firsts: the first time a wide range of popular Nigerian series can be binged from the beginning, and a partnership with Big Brother Naija featuring live streaming of the Sunday night evictions as well as two new BBNaija shows that are exclusive to Showmax. One of the new shows will be hosted by comedians Basketmouth and Bovi, who will provide commentary on happenings in the Big Brother Naija house.

“We’re aiming for the sweet spot that other services may have missed,” says Niclas Ekdahl, CEO of MultiChoice Group’s Connected Video division. “Taking a generic service and tacking on a few Nollywood movies won’t cut it, so we’re coming in with a strong mix of bang up-to-date Nigerian shows, international hits and favourites from across Africa, and now, as something completely new: on-demand and live Big Brother Naija content.”

Showmax will live-stream all Sunday eviction episodes of Big Brother Naija as well as the finale, and recordings of the nomination shows will be posted on Tuesdays. In addition to this, two brand-new shows, exclusive to Showmax, have been produced. Big Brother Naija Extra View is a 25-minute compilation of unseen footage and will be added to the site daily from Tuesday to Saturday. Big Brother Naija Hot Room is a 25-minute satirical commentary on the week’s main drama and action, hosted by legendary comedians Basketmouth and Bovi, with new episodes coming every Sunday evening ahead of the evictions.

The following shows will be added daily, as they air on Africa Magic channels, with all past episodes available to binge from the beginning:

– Tinsel, one of Nigeria’s longest running TV series and Africa Magic Viewers Choice Best Drama 2017

– The Johnsons, featuring City People Award winners Olumide Oworu and Charles Inojie

– My Flatmates, starring 2018 Savanna Pan-African Comic of the Year Basketmouth

The new Showmax service will feature hundreds of Nollywood movies and thousands of TV show episodes and Bollywood shows. Telenovelas will also be part of the lineup, as will hits from the rest of Africa like Kenya’s Supa Modo, winner of 50 international awards, and South Africa’s big Africa Movie Academy Awards winner Five Fingers For Marseilles

The lineup of international shows on the new service includes ChernobylVikingsPowerGame of ThronesTrue Detective (starring Mahershala Ali), InsecureBillions, Ballers, and Luther (starring Nigerian BAFTA winner Wunmi Mosaku opposite Idris Elba). The latest episodes of Big Little Lies are added weekly.

There’s also a major focus on kids, with shows like Paw PatrolPJ Masks, and Doc McStuffins.

To get Showmax, visit www.showmax.com. Showmax has a risk-free trial: once signed up, cancel within the first 14 days and pay nothing. Once the 14-day free trial is over, the cost is N2,900 per month.

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Want a competitive edge? Unlock your business data

By Dr YUDHVIR SEETHARAM, head of analytics, insights and research for FNB Business

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The businesses which will be able to count themselves amongst the most successful in the coming years will be those that have succeeded in fully harnessing the power of data. But while you’d be hard pressed to find many businesses that are not currently building or acquiring systems and technical resources aimed at unlocking the value of data, the same priority does not appear to have been given to embedding data-driven organisational cultures.

This failure to focus on culture in parallel with technology not only reveals a lack of understanding of the symbiotic nature of the relationship between the two, but also presents a real risk that the massive investments being made into data might not deliver the returns that companies are hoping for.

The problem lies in the fact that while data analytics and processing are relatively exact sciences, a data-driven culture is significantly more difficult to define. So while company owners, managers and executives may not be able to tell you exactly how data analysis works, they can tell you what they want to get out of it. The same isn’t true of their understanding of a data-driven culture, and so the creation of such a culture is either assigned a lower strategic priority, or simply handed off to the organisation’s Chief Technology Officer, Chief Data Officer or HR executive.

This approach is very unlikely to unlock the full value of being data driven. To do that, every person in the organisation has to recognise the importance of being fully data-driven as a competitive differentiator and embrace the need to build a data-driven culture within that organisation.

This is by no means a small ask. Apart from the significant challenges – both technical and human – that a business is bound to face en route to becoming truly data-driven, it’s likely that every person in a company has little to no idea of what the concept of ‘culture’ actually means in a company, let alone what a data-driven culture looks or feels like.

And that’s why the process of transforming a culture to be data driven must begin with the end in mind. That, of course, begs the question: What is a data-driven culture? Unfortunately, there is no simple answer as every business is different and will have different culture parameters. However, it is relatively safe to say that, irrespective of how businesses look or work, their data-driven cultures will have a few things in common.

For one, a data-driven culture will be built on the broad recognition of data as a vital, strategically essential business asset; one that allows the business to make well-considered decisions based on facts and figures rather than on intuition or past experience. Having a data-driven culture will also mean that the business fully recognises and embraces the ability of data and its application to empower all employees to perform their functions much more effectively. And lastly, a business will know that it has completed its transformation to a data-driven culture when it is able to identify and align its technical and business challenges and leverage data to solve both together.

When you consider these factors as characteristics of a data-driven culture, it becomes obvious that being data-driven is not solely a technical strategy. So, while it is important to recruit skilled and talented data scientists and technology professionals to give physical effect to the data-driven vision, trying to become data-driven in isolation from the business and all its other employees is almost certainly a recipe for failure. Which brings me to the second obvious question that will, or at least should, be asked by every business that wants to be able to unlock the full potential of data as a transformative, business building asset. And that is: How do we do it?

This, too, is a simple question without a simple answer. Most of the global organisations that are considered to have succeeded in becoming data driven still admit to being in the learning phase when it comes to embedding a data-driven culture. FNB is no exception. But we remain committed to the process and, I believe, have gained some valuable insights into the steps that businesses, and especially financial services organisations, need to take to move closer towards achieving a data-driven culture.

The first of these is to start by transforming thinking. You need to get the entire leadership body to commit to supporting and promoting a data-driven culture. Even if very few of them understand what that means, a good first step is to simply get board and executive management agreement to being willing to embrace a culture of openness and collaboration.

Then, with that leadership support, start to communicate with the entire organisation to create an understanding of the meaning and value of being data driven, both for the company and its employees and customers. Ultimately, any shift in culture is only possible when culture is mainstreamed. It cannot be the domain or responsibility of HR. So, an organised and strategic education campaign is essential to explain the benefits that embracing a data-driven culture will provide.

The next step is to commit to democratising data. When employees have access to data, its impact becomes obvious. Break down silos and protectionism. Make data, and its analyses, readily available, understandable, and transparent across the organization.

Obviously, it’s dangerous to just give everyone in the organisation unfettered access to all its data, since they probably don’t have the skills or tools to make use of that data. And that’s where the real culture shift happens, or must happen. Businesses need to focus on building collaborative, multi-functional teams. While tech experts may understand the technology and systems, data is first and foremost a business asset. So a data-driven culture has to be driven by the business. And since it’s unlikely that you’re going to find too many employees with a balanced combination of business and data skills, you need to build your data-driven culture on collaborative teams in which every team member is willing to acknowledge what he or she doesn’t know, and work closely with teammates that do. This approach should also inform all future recruitment decisions. In a data-driven culture, you don’t recruit just for a vacancy, you recruit to make teams stronger.

Finally, be patient. Changing a company’s culture takes time, effort and commitment. Even when the leadership sets the example, the shift only happens through organic growth and evolution.

Realise that there are legacies that have to be changed. The technology legacy systems are actually the easy part because you can throw money at those. But human legacies around how things have always been done in the past are much more difficult to shift. But it must be done, because it is impossible to change to a data-driven culture if all your people are not willing to recognise and embrace data as a key success facilitator.

While the need to build these types of data-driven cultures is becoming increasingly obvious, the unexpected, and valuable, side effect of achieving such a culture is that it has the potential to massively enhance employee morale and productivity. That’s not just because data-based decisions are infinitely more effective than those based on hunches. It’s also because employees grow as people when the work they do has meaning.

Data has the ability to quantify the impact that each employee is having on the customers and the business. And when staff see the tangible value of the contributions they are making, they become far more connected to the company values and their own professional goals, and the result is incremental improvements in personal performance and, of course, bottom-line results.

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