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10 things drones can do for your business

The rapidly-growing global drone market presents a plethora of opportunities for companies to enhance their operations, or for new businesses to emerge. GIDEON GERBER of Airborne Drones SA outlines ten ways they can benefit a business.

With analysts putting the global market opportunities around drones at anywhere between $11 billion and $13 billion by 2020, organisations across all verticals stand to gain by harnessing the new capabilities unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs) deliver. Nearly three million drones will be manufactured this year alone, and the global market revenue for drones is expected to top $11.2 billion by 2020, says Gartner. Goldman Sachs Research expects businesses and civil governments to spend $13 billion on drones by 2020, putting thousands of them in the sky.

Drones have gone beyond military tools and consumer toys. In fact, the biggest demand for drones today is coming out of the commercial and government sectors.

Commercial, long-range drones offer organisations the ability to map, monitor and control large and hard to navigate areas, at a lower cost than through traditional methods and with no risk to employees. The fact that you’re able to get HD aerial feeds and explore highly targeted zones using drones presents significant opportunities for a number of sectors.

There are 10 key areas where drones can offer compelling benefits:

Construction efficiencies – predicted by Goldman Sachs Research to be by far the largest commercial application for drones in the short term, drones offer construction firms and developers efficient new 2D and 3D mapping methods, as well as thermal and multi-spectral imaging and real-time data for Building Information Modelling. This allows for greater efficiencies from pre-construction through to maintenance phase.

Asset management – currently the most compelling drone application for multiple industry verticals is asset management and protection. Whether the assets are power lines, buildings, humans, wildlife or roads, drones are being deployed for rapid, efficient inventory and survey purposes.

Maintenance – Drones support ongoing routine facilities inspections at lower cost and risk, particularly in potentially hazardous areas such as power lines or power plants, or in the case of very tall structures such as radio antennas or bridges. Drones also allows for wear and damage assessments, supported by technologies such as thermal imaging cameras, bypassing the need for ground crews and specialised equipment. They can also be used for routine deliveries of consumables and spares between pre-programmed launch and landing pads, so reducing cost and potential downtime.

Agriculture – advanced agriculture will depend on drone technologies for multiple applications, such as crop and irrigation inspection, precision spraying, mapping and security.

Mapping – for developers, civil engineers and local authorities, drones’ mapping applications offer an efficient geographic survey tool – even across challenging terrain and bodies of water.

Surveys and research – The use of drones for mapping and geographic surveys can also add significant value to marketers and brands researching target areas; as well as to public sector authorities confirming census data or assessing development needs.

Risk monitoring and claims assessment – for the insurance sector, drones offer the ability to efficiently assess population density, natural risk, property values and damages; enabling more accurate forecasting, more competitive products and faster claims resolution.

Safety and security – unlike satellite imaging, traditional aerial surveys or human resources on the ground, drones offer the ability to conduct highly targeted surveillance with live feeds to headquarters and no risk to human life. In high-risk situations, such as civil unrest or natural disaster, drones allow for ongoing assessment of the situation, supporting rapid and appropriate response. Drones can also be deployed for search and rescue purposes, covering ground more effectively than ground teams are able to, and could potentially be used for emergency medical deliveries.

Film and multimedia – already widely is use by film and photography professionals, the potential for drones to add new dimensions to multimedia is significant. Aerial visuals now possible through drones also offer opportunities to the real estate, hospitality and tourism sectors to enhance marketing and communications.

Drones-as-a-service – multiple new business opportunities now exist for the launch of specialist drone surveillance and survey services.

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Eugene Kaspersky posts from 2050

In his imagined blog entry from the year 2050, the Kaspersky Lab founder imagines an era of digital immunity

In recent years, digital systems have moved up to a whole new level. No longer assistants making life easier for us mere mortals, they’ve become the basis of civilisation — the very framework keeping the world functioning properly in 2050.

This quantum leap forward has generated new requirements for the reliability and stability of artificial intelligence. Although some cyberthreats still haven’t become extinct since the romantic era around the turn of the century, they’re now dangerous only to outliers who for some reason reject modern standards of digital immunity.

The situation in many ways resembles the fight against human diseases. Thanks to the success of vaccines, the terrible epidemics that once devastated entire cities in the twentieth century are a thing of the past.

However, that’s where the resemblance ends. For humans, diseases like the plague or smallpox have been replaced by new, highly resistant “post-vaccination” diseases; but for the machines, things have turned out much better. This is largely because the initial designers of digital immunity made all the right preparations for it in advance. In doing so, what helped them in particular was borrowing the systemic approaches of living systems and humans.

One of the pillars of cyber-immunity today is digital intuition, the ability of AI systems to make the right decisions in conditions where the source data are clearly insufficient to make a rational choice.

But there’s no mysticism here: Digital intuition is merely the logical continuation of the idea of machine learning. When the number and complexity of related self-learning systems exceeds a certain threshold, the quality of decision-making rises to a whole new level — a level that’s completely elusive to rational understanding. An “intuitive solution” results fromthe superimposition of the experience of a huge number of machine-learning models, much like the result of the calculations of a quantum computer.

So, as you can see, it has been digital intuition, with its ability to instantly, correctly respond to unknown challenges that has helped build the digital security standards of this new era.  

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M-Net to film Deon Meyer novel

A television adaptation of Deon Meyer’s crime novel Trackers is to be co-produced by M-Net, Germany’s public broadcaster ZDF, and HBO subsidiary Cinemax, which will also distribute the drama series worldwide. 

Trackers is an unprecedented scripted television venture and MultiChoice and M-Net are proud to chart out new territory … allowing local and international talent to combine their world-class story-telling and production skills,” says MultiChoice CEO of General Entertainment, Yolisa Phahle.

HBO, Cinemax, and M-Net also launched a Producers Apprenticeship programme last year when the Cinemax series Warrior, coming to M-Net in July, was filmed in South Africa. Some other Cinemax originals screened on M-Net include Banshee, The Knick and Strike Back. 

“Cinemax is delighted to partner with M-Net and ZDF in bringing Deon Meyer’s unforgettable characters and storytelling—all so richly rooted in the people and spectacular geography of South Africa—to screens around the world,” says Len Amato, President, HBO Films, Miniseries, and Cinemax.    

Filming for Trackers has already started in  locations across South Africa and the co-production partners have been working together on all aspects of production 

Deon Meyer, whose award-winning crime novels have been translated into more than 20 languages, with millions of copies sold worldwide, serves as a supervising screenwriter and co-producer; British writer Robert Thorogood (Death in Paradise) is the showrunner. The team of South African writers on the project includes the Mitchell’s Plain playwright, screenwriter and director Amy Jephta (Die Ellen Pakkies Story) and local writer/directors Kelsey Egen and Jozua Malherbe. 

The cast for the six-part miniseries includes Ed Stoppard, Rolanda Marais, James Alexander and Thapelo Mokoena. 

Trackers will make its debut on M-Net 101 in October 2019 and will also be available on MultiChoice’s on-demand service, Showmax. The six-part drama series is produced by UK production company Three River Studios as well as South Africa’s Scene 23. 

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