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CES 2016: Intel, Samsung, in mobile excellence honours

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Intel and Samsung were among the few high-profile technology companies sharing the honours in the annual Mobile Excellence Awards announced at CES in Las Vegas last week.

Low-profile players and companies not normally associated with technology dominated the Mobile Excellence Awards announced at CES in Las Vegas last week. Among high-profile technology names, only Intel and Samsung made the honours list.

Now in its 9th year, the Mobile Excellence Awards (MEA) recognises companies “that have truly set the bar of excellence in their respective fields”.  Honorees range from leading brands to studios, carriers and startups in mobile technology, entertainment and lifestyle.

Aside from officially announcing the 2015 Best of Mobile winners at CES, it also revealed plans to launch the first MEA Europe which will take place in Ireland in conjunction with the ICONS Festival, a global festival that focuses on the convergence of technology, music and film.

“We are very excited to be moving into our 9th year with new partners, sponsors innovators and leaders who have  been instrumental in shaping the future of mobile.” said Sarah Miller, CEO of Axis PR & Entertainment and Executive Producer, Mobile Excellence Awards. “The MEAs are looking forward to expanding this prestigious awards program to Europe this year as this will give more international companies a wider platform to be recognized  and help bridge technology innovation across multiple countries.”

The 8th Annual Mobile Excellence Award Winners were:

Best Mobile Leadership

Intel Corporation

Industry Star  

Capital One

Best AR/VR for Mobile  

Samsung Milk VR

Best Branded Experience Made for Mobile

FunMobility: Chiquita & Universal Pictures “Minions Love Bananas 2015”

Best Delivery Platform for Mobile

Leadbolt

Best eCommerce for Mobile

Blackhawk Network/GoWallet

Best Payment/Banking  

Capital One Mobile 5

Best Entertainment Related Marketing Campaign  

Heineken’s UEFA Champion the Match

Best International

Turkcell Connect: Internet in Offline Mode

Best Mobile Analytics/Big Data

Hopi

Best Mobile Start Up  

CARDFREE

Best Mobile Utility App  

YouMail

Best Mobile Video  

Opera Mediaworks / Carl’s Jr. Super Bowl Instant-Feed Campaign

Best Original Content  

E! Entertainment- “E! Style Collective”

Best Social Community

ooVoo

Best Mobile App/Service for Connected Daily Lifestyle

HomeAdvisor.

Best Mobile Games  

Kabam – Marvel Contest of Champions

Best Mobile App for Wearable Technology

InterContinental Hotels Group (IHG)

Best Mobile Innovator  

Synaptics’ ClearPad 4300 touch and display driver integration solutions for smartphones and tablets

Best Mobile Product

Intel, Eaglespeak

Best Mobile Sports

Sapient Nitro, Surf Pegasus App

Best Technology Breakthrough  

Synaptics’ ClearPad 4300 touch and display driver integration solutions for smartphones and tablets

Best User Experience for Mobile  

Runtastic

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Samsung unfolds the future

At the #Unpacked launch, Samsung delivered the world’s first foldable phone from a major brand. ARTHUR GOLDSTUCK tried it out.

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Everything that could be known about the new Samsung Galaxy S10 range, launched on Wednesday in San Francisco, seems to have been known before the event.

Most predictions were spot-on, including those in Gadget (see our preview here), thanks to a series of leaks so large, they competed with the hole an iceberg made in the Titanic.

The big surprise was that there was a big surprise. While it was widely expected that Samsung would announce a foldable phone, few predicted what would emerge from that announcement. About the only thing that was guessed right was the name: Galaxy Fold.

The real surprise was the versatility of the foldable phone, and the fact that units were available at the launch. During the Johannesburg event, at which the San Francisco launch was streamed live, small groups of media took turns to enter a private Fold viewing area where photos were banned, personal phones had to be handed in, and the Fold could be tried out under close supervision.

The first impression is of a compact smartphone with a relatively small screen on the front – it measures 4.6-inches – and a second layer of phone at the back. With a click of a button, the phone folds out to reveal a 7.3-inch inside screen – the equivalent of a mini tablet.

The fold itself is based on a sophisticated hinge design that probably took more engineering than the foldable display. The result is a large screen with no visible seam.

The device introduces the concept of “app continuity”, which means an app can be opened on the front and, in mid-use, if the handset is folded open, continue on the inside from where the user left off on the front. The difference is that the app will the have far more space for viewing or other activity.

Click here to read about the app experience on the inside of the Fold.

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Password managers don’t protect you from hackers

Using a password manager to protect yourself online? Research reveals serious weaknesses…

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Top password manager products have fundamental flaws that expose the data they are designed to protect, rendering them no more secure than saving passwords in a text file, according to a new study by researchers at Independent Security Evaluators (ISE).

“100 percent of the products that ISE analyzed failed to provide the security to safeguard a user’s passwords as advertised,” says ISE CEO Stephen Bono. “Although password managers provide some utility for storing login/passwords and limit password reuse, these applications are a vulnerable target for the mass collection of this data through malicious hacking campaigns.”

In the new report titled “Under the Hood of Secrets Management,” ISE researchers revealed serious weaknesses with top password managers: 1Password, Dashlane, KeePass and LastPass.  ISE examined the underlying functionality of these products on Windows 10 to understand how users’ secrets are stored even when the password manager is locked. More than 60 million individuals 93,000 businesses worldwide rely on password managers. Click here for a copy of the report.

Password managers are marketed as a solution to eliminate the security risks of storing passwords or secrets for applications and browsers in plain text documents. Having previously examined these and other password managers, ISE researchers expected an improved level of security standards preventing malicious credential extraction. Instead ISE found just the opposite. 

Click here to read the findings from the report.

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