Connect with us

Featured

When data need not intimidate

Published

on

As more data sources become available, businesses often struggle to manage them. However, proper data management starts with a solid understanding of data governance which many companies think is an intimidating task, writes ANTIONETTE VAN ZYL.

Market forces are driving data awareness as businesses realise that they can derive significant value from effectively analysing data and applying the findings to decisions and actions, and as regulators tighten rules around how data should be managed.

‘Big data’ is still used as a buzzword in business. But data has always been available – it’s just evolving as more data sources become available, such as cloud, mobile and click-stream data. And with the growth of machine-to-machine technology and the Internet of Things, even more data sources will come online soon. So how do we manage these new data types?

Proper data management starts with a solid understanding of data governance. Businesses also need strong policies that enforce rules regarding data management. Effective data governance involves people, processes and technology to ensure consistent and proper handling of data. It involves all levels of data processing, including data management, data quality, policy management, business process management and risk management.

Data should be clearly defined, secure and fit for purpose if a business wants to derive benefit from it. To achieve this level of data reliability, policies should specify how data should be captured. This quality control measure ensures that any data issues are corrected at the source and that information assets are formally managed throughout the enterprise.

Effective data governance practices require support from executive management if they are to be successful. However, many CEOs do not link data to business value, believing that data is an IT issue, while IT believes it merely supplies the data to the organisation.

Another challenge when implementing data governance strategies is that different departments within an organisation have different agendas when it comes to data. As a result, they may each have their own processes for managing data, resulting in siloed systems that don’t communicate with each other and are difficult to integrate.

There is a perception that data governance is a massive and intimidating task. Businesses know they should be doing it but they don’t know where to start. Data governance doesn’t need to be applied to the entire organisation in one fell swoop. Rather, when embarking on the data governance journey, businesses should start small – in a single department. Data governance requires change – change in mindsets and change in processes. It’s much easier to convince staff and executives of the business value of data governance if benefits can be shown in a single area and expanded from there.

Data governance framework

So where do you start? Below, I have outlined a top-down data governance framework that will assist any business in establishing a single, consistent set of policies and processes for managing data. The good news is that data governance is not a linear process – businesses can start from the top, the bottom, or somewhere in the middle. My advice is to start with those areas that are already in place and work from there.

Plan

Determine the business’ data governance readiness. Identify current high-impact projects and upcoming initiatives and link these to a strategic initiative. For example, one business strategy could be to increase customer retention numbers through a loyalty programme and setting up social platforms to engage with customers. Initiatives to achieve this could include using analytics to anticipate customer need based on behaviour trends and to tailor offers and communication to those needs.

Next, assemble a core working team that will provide oversight, manage risk and assess compliance. This group of visionaries will define the data governance charter, including the business mission, key benefits and guiding principles.

Design

Identify an initial target project, such as a customer loyalty programme. A data governance council is decided at this stage, which will serve as the main decision-making body on the project. It will also determine the decision rights, list key decisions, engage other decision-making bodies and assign accountabilities.

It’s important at this stage to refine and formalise data management – this is where IT will be roped in.

Execute

Go forth and launch your data governance process! Key to ongoing success is to continually measure and refine the process, monitor progress and report issues or risks. At this stage, data governance should be absorbed into the software development lifecycle so that it forms part of all processes going forward.

Poor data governance can cause many headaches for businesses, including poor customer service, limited upsell/cross-sell opportunities, an inefficient supply chain, an inability to automate key processes, poor operational planning and execution, and, importantly, exposure to fraud and other risk.

On the other hand, efficient data governance systems present a single platform on which all different roles and departments can be supported, allowing for the enforcement of central policies and monitoring of those policies. As a result, information is treated as a business asset and is readily available to support evidence-based decision-making – this saves time as the business knows the data can be trusted and does not need to be verified.

Ultimately, the business is able to make decisions faster, its information is consistent and aligns with values and goals, and risk management is improved – all because of collaboration and clean, valuable data.

* Antionette Van Zyl, Senior Solution Manager: Data Management at SAS

Featured

Samsung unfolds the future

At the #Unpacked launch, Samsung delivered the world’s first foldable phone from a major brand. ARTHUR GOLDSTUCK tried it out.

Published

on

Everything that could be known about the new Samsung Galaxy S10 range, launched on Wednesday in San Francisco, seems to have been known before the event.

Most predictions were spot-on, including those in Gadget (see our preview here), thanks to a series of leaks so large, they competed with the hole an iceberg made in the Titanic.

The big surprise was that there was a big surprise. While it was widely expected that Samsung would announce a foldable phone, few predicted what would emerge from that announcement. About the only thing that was guessed right was the name: Galaxy Fold.

The real surprise was the versatility of the foldable phone, and the fact that units were available at the launch. During the Johannesburg event, at which the San Francisco launch was streamed live, small groups of media took turns to enter a private Fold viewing area where photos were banned, personal phones had to be handed in, and the Fold could be tried out under close supervision.

The first impression is of a compact smartphone with a relatively small screen on the front – it measures 4.6-inches – and a second layer of phone at the back. With a click of a button, the phone folds out to reveal a 7.3-inch inside screen – the equivalent of a mini tablet.

The fold itself is based on a sophisticated hinge design that probably took more engineering than the foldable display. The result is a large screen with no visible seam.

The device introduces the concept of “app continuity”, which means an app can be opened on the front and, in mid-use, if the handset is folded open, continue on the inside from where the user left off on the front. The difference is that the app will the have far more space for viewing or other activity.

Click here to read about the app experience on the inside of the Fold.

Previous Page1 of 4

Continue Reading

Featured

Password managers don’t protect you from hackers

Using a password manager to protect yourself online? Research reveals serious weaknesses…

Published

on

Top password manager products have fundamental flaws that expose the data they are designed to protect, rendering them no more secure than saving passwords in a text file, according to a new study by researchers at Independent Security Evaluators (ISE).

“100 percent of the products that ISE analyzed failed to provide the security to safeguard a user’s passwords as advertised,” says ISE CEO Stephen Bono. “Although password managers provide some utility for storing login/passwords and limit password reuse, these applications are a vulnerable target for the mass collection of this data through malicious hacking campaigns.”

In the new report titled “Under the Hood of Secrets Management,” ISE researchers revealed serious weaknesses with top password managers: 1Password, Dashlane, KeePass and LastPass.  ISE examined the underlying functionality of these products on Windows 10 to understand how users’ secrets are stored even when the password manager is locked. More than 60 million individuals 93,000 businesses worldwide rely on password managers. Click here for a copy of the report.

Password managers are marketed as a solution to eliminate the security risks of storing passwords or secrets for applications and browsers in plain text documents. Having previously examined these and other password managers, ISE researchers expected an improved level of security standards preventing malicious credential extraction. Instead ISE found just the opposite. 

Click here to read the findings from the report.

Previous Page1 of 2

Continue Reading

Trending

Copyright © 2018 World Wide Worx