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How hearing aids help keep the brain fit

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Hearing loss accelerates cognitive decline, however research has shown that those who use hearing aids show less of a decline than those who don’t.

Keeping your brain fit so that you can stay sharp, engage socially and participate in professional or volunteer activities is a concept that appeals to a wide range of age groups, from young adults to baby boomers and beyond.  While many strategies for “healthy aging” exist, the newest evidence points to the important role of hearing health in maintaining quality of life long-term.

Hearing Loss & Cognitive Decline

Better hearing starts in the brain. Your brain processes and interprets the sounds your ears receive.  When you have hearing loss, your brain doesn’t receive all the sound information it needs to understand what is being said and spends more energy trying to fill in the blanks. That extra effort can take its toll. A growing body of evidence shows that cognitive decline is significantly accelerated when you have hearing loss and don’t use hearing aids.  As conversations become difficult and exhausting, you may start to withdraw and avoid the social connections that are so important to brain health.

Keeping Your Brain Fit

If you are among the 75% of people with hearing loss who could benefit from hearing aids but are reluctant to take action, the newest research findings may be the powerful motivator you need.  A study published in the prestigious Journal of the American Geriatrics Society found no difference in the rate of cognitive decline between people with no reported hearing loss and people with hearing loss who used hearing aids. In fact, people with hearing loss who wear hearing aids had the same risk for age-related cognitive decline as people without hearing loss.  When you actively use hearing aids, you are more likely to stay socially engaged, one of the primary ways to stimulate your brain. Like any exercise, the mental give-and-take of social interaction helps to keep your brain fit and slow down accelerated cognitive decline.

A “Brain First” Approach

Today’s advanced hearing aid technology takes into consideration the critical role that the brain plays in hearing. For almost 20 years, Oticon researchers at the world renowned Eriksholm Research Centre have focused on a “brain first” approach that carefully processes the speech signal so it is presented to the brain as clearly and accurately as possible. With better sound information, the brain doesn’t have to work as hard to understand what is being said.

Oticon hearing instruments with BrainHearing™ are an excellent example of this “brain first” approach. By giving the brain a clearer, more accurate sound signal, Oticon hearing aids with BrainHearing™ make it easier to understand conversation – even in noise.  The result is a more natural, effortless listening experience.  This means less demanding mental processing throughout the day so you can engage more actively in everyday life.

Easy on the Brain, Easy Connectivity

Oticon Opn™ is the first hearing aid proven to make it easier on the brain. The small, discreet hearing aid improves your ability to understand speech by up to 30%, so you don’t have to work as hard to understand, leaving more mental energy to remember what you hear – so you can communicate easily and stay socially active. Opn processes sound at extreme speed to remove distracting noise, even between words. You can follow conversation even in environments with multiple people speaking, such as crowded restaurants.

The newest BrainHearing solution also connects directly to compatible mobile phones and other external devices so you can stay connected on the go. With just a tap of your fingertips, you can stream audio directly to your hearing aids. Opn is also the world’s first hearing device that is connected to the Internet via the IFTTT network, a web service that automates other web-based functions to make life easier. You can use Opn hearing aids with a growing number of IFTTT-compatible products and services from wake-up notices and sports reports to practical considerations such as low battery alerts and connections to smart home devices.

Tinnitus & Your Brain

Tinnitus – that ringing, buzzing, whistling or other noises in the ear – can disrupt life and interfere with your enjoyment of everyday activities.  Approximately 80% of people experiencing hearing loss also suffer from tinnitus. Hearing aids have proven helpful for people with hearing loss who also experience tinnitus. The explanation is simple. With better hearing, the brain has other external sounds to listen to, making tinnitus less disturbing. Improved hearing also takes away the strain of listening, especially in difficult listening situations, and may help to reduce the stress associated with tinnitus.

Refocusing the Brain

There are many ways to take control of your tinnitus and reduce its impact on your life. A hearing care professional can help you manage your symptoms through education, counseling and sound therapy. Oticon Opn hearing aids with built-in Tinnitus SoundSupport™ can also help you direct your focus away from tinnitus by playing a wide range of relief sounds like white noise and soothing ocean-like sounds. You can adjust the sounds until they give the relief you need — wherever you find yourself needing it.

Hearing Care is Health Care

When it comes to healthy aging, it makes sense to take care of your hearing health, just as you care about the rest of your health. The World Health Organisation estimates that more than 360 million people worldwide suffer from hearing loss. Many of them aren’t aware of it or are putting off treatment. If you’re one of them, you owe it to yourself to visit a hearing care professional for a hearing evaluation. Your future as an active, engaged, healthy person could depend on it.

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Jaguar drives dictionary definition

Jaguar is calling for the Oxford English Dictionary and Oxford Dictionaries to update their online definition of the word ‘car’

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Jaguar is spearheading a campaign for the Oxford English Dictionary (OED) and Oxford Dictionaries (OxfordDictionaries.com) to change their official online definitions of the word ‘car’.

The I-PACE, Jaguar’s all-electric performance SUV, is the 2019 World Car of the Year and European Car of the Year. However, strictly speaking, the zero-emission vehicle isn’t defined as a car.

The OED, the principal historical dictionary of the English language, defines a ‘car’ in its online dictionary as: ‘a road vehicle powered by a motor (usually an internal combustion engine) designed to carry a driver and a small number of passengers, and usually having two front and two rear wheels, esp. for private, commercial, or leisure use’.

Whereas the current definition of a ‘car’ on Oxford Dictionaries.com, a collection of dictionary websites produced by Oxford University Press (OUP), the publishing house of the University of Oxford, is: ‘A road vehicle, typically with four wheels, powered by an internal combustion engine and able to carry a small number of people.’

To remedy the situation, Jaguar has submitted a formal application to the OED and OxfordDictionaries.com to have the definitions updated to include additional powertrains, including electric vehicles (EV).

David Browne, head of Jaguar Land Rover’s naming committee, said: “A lot of time and thought is put into the name of any new vehicle or technology to ensure it is consumer friendly, so it’s surprising to see that the definition of the car is a little outdated. We are therefore inviting the Oxford English Dictionary and the Oxford Dictionaries to update its online classification to reflect the shift from traditional internal combustion engines (ICE) towards more sustainable powertrains.”

The Oxford English Dictionary is widely regarded as the accepted authority on the English language. It is an unsurpassed guide to the meaning, history, and pronunciation of 600,000 words – past and present – from across the English-speaking world.

Jaguar unveiled the I-PACE, its first all-electric vehicle, last year to deliver sustainable sports car performance, next-generation artificial intelligence (AI) technology and five-seat SUV practicality.

Featuring a state-of-the-art 90kWh lithium-ion battery, two Jaguar-designed motors and a bespoke aluminium structure, the I-PACE is capable of 0-100km/h in 4.8 seconds and a range of up to 470km (WLTP).

While both the Oxford English Dictionary and Oxford Dictionaries review the application, Jaguar is encouraging people to get behind the campaign by asking how the word ‘car’ should be defined. Contact Jaguar on TwitterFacebook and Instagram using #RedefineTheCar with your thoughts.

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How Internet blocks visually impaired

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Picture: Amelie-Benoist / Getty Images

A pervasive “digital divide” inhibits blind people from accessing the Internet, according to a study conducted by Nucleus Research for Deque Systems, an accessibility software company specialising in digital equality. This results in visits to websites being abandoned, further resulting in a missed market opportunity for the websites in question.

The study, which conducted in-depth interviews with 73 U.S. adults who are blind or have severe visual impairments, revealed that two-thirds of the Internet transactions initiated by people with vision impairments end in abandonment because the websites they visit aren’t accessible enough. Ninety percent of those surveyed said they regularly call a site’s customer service to report inaccessibility and have no choice but to visit another, more accessible site to make the transaction.

The Nucleus study also scanned hundreds of websites in the e-commerce, news and information and government categories and found that 70 percent had certain “critical blockers” that rendered them inaccessible to visually impaired users.

“Besides the moral dilemma and legal risk, businesses with inaccessible websites are missing a huge revenue opportunity by ignoring an untapped market,” says Preety Kumar, CEO of Deque Systems. “Among internet retailers specifically, two-thirds of the top ten online retailers had serious accessibility issues, meaning they are leaving $6.9 billion in potential North American e-commerce revenues on the table.”

Web accessibility refers to the ability of people with disabilities to independently gather information, complete transactions, or communicate on the Internet. Most visually impaired Internet users rely on assistive technologies like screen readers or screen magnifiers to render sites perceivable and operable. However, these assistive technologies require that websites be built with accessibility in mind and optimized to interface with assistive technology, in order to convey information in an accurate and understandable manner.

Critical accessibility blockers can vary across industries. In e-commerce, problems include issues like missing form and button labels (thereby making forms or the “checkout” button invisible without context). Amazon, Best Buy and Target were found to be accessibility leaders in this space. Additionally, the study found:

  • Eight out of ten news sites had significant accessibility issues.
  • Seven out of ten blind persons reported being unable to access information and services through government websites, including Medicare’s site.
  • Fewer than one in three websites have clear contact information or instructions for blind persons to seek help if they encounter accessibility issues, meaning many have low levels of success in reporting and solving these problems.

“A focus on accessibility needs to be a core part of the website design and development process,” continues Kumar. “Considering accessibility as early as the conception phase, and proactively building and testing sites for accessibility as they move towards production, is significantly more effective than remediating it later, helping organizations save significant time and resources while avoiding unnecessary customer grievances.”

To download the report, visit: https://accessibility.deque.com/nucleus-accessibility-research-2019

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