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Biometric Security: The Fine Print

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As adoption of biometric authentication increases, it’s important to understand the security methods used to protect biometric data, writes GREG SARRAIL, VP of Solutions Business Development at Biometrics at HID Global.

Biometric solutions are rapidly becoming the new standard for providing secure and convenient identity verification for consumers and corporations. In recent years, biometric technologies have been adopted to enhance security on mobile devices, secure access to facilities and even validate individual identity within the banking industry. When faced with new technology, many people question the security of the solution.  Where does the biometric data reside? Is it protected? Can it be easily accessed? If the data is compromised, can it be used maliciously?

Protect and/or render useless

Biometric fingerprint data is the information that is obtained by capturing unique features from an individual fingerprint image.  There are several ways to protect this information to ensure that it cannot be openly accessed and used for fraudulent means. During user authentication, the biometric data collected by the sensor must match the information that was captured during enrolment and is stored on a back-end system.  Most biometric systems use templates, mathematical representations of biometric data, rather than a raw image of a fingerprint.  Templates are much smaller than full images, which decreases the time required to provide a match, minimizes storage requirements and protects user privacy because a fingerprint image cannot be reconstructed from a template.  Some systems provide an additional layer of security by encrypting the transport tunnel and even the templates themselves to ensure the data is protected as it moves from the sensor to the back-end system.

Additional security methods can be deployed which are more dependent on the specific use case. For example, in an ATM setting, a user’s biometric information can be augmented before it is stored in a uniform way. This security practice is called “salting” and is done by combining the individual’s PIN and the fingerprint data prior to being stored. When verifying the biometric information, the same PIN is used with the same salting algorithm to provide a match. The advantage of this approach is that the back-end database does not contain an image of a fingerprint or even a standard template, but rather the combined “salted” template.  This approach increases both the security and privacy of a system.

An alternate approach is to eliminate the back-end database altogether by placing the secured biometric information on a card that is carried by the user. The new South African National ID, for example, is an identity card that securely stores an individual’s unique biometric fingerprint information that was captured during the enrolment process and was written to the card. This card is then presented at the time of verification. After the individual places a finger on the sensor the information is matched locally against the data stored on the card. No database must be queried; the transaction simply confirms that the identity of the user matches the identity stored on the card. This approach reduces the reliance on the back-end database and external transmission security.

Biometrics is the measurement of physiological characteristics; characteristics that are unique to each individual. Facial characteristics are plainly available — this is how people recognize each other, after all — and fingerprints are left behind at every restaurant, subway rail or door that we touch. A secure system must ensure that an individual, and only that individual, can use his or her own biometric data to authenticate. Thus, it is not enough to simply match biometric characteristics against enrolled data, since access to your fingerprint information isn’t protected. A secure fingerprint system will evaluate whether the finger being presented is real or simply a falsified representation of actual fingerprint data. This capability is called liveness detection and it provides an important way to secure biometric information. Liveness detection reduces the ability for a fraudster to use a fake finger or replay stolen biometric data since the data is useless without a live finger. Whichever combination of security methods are used to secure your identity, the ultimate goal is to render biometric data useless if a perpetrator were to access it.

Verify, not identify

In the non-criminal setting, biometrics is typically used to verify an individual and not to identify an individual. To verify a person’s identity the goal is to confirm with the highest level of assurance that the person is who he or she claims to be. Commercial applications often use demographic information, account numbers, card numbers or digital certificates in addition to the fingerprint data to determine a match.

Criminal systems typically don’t have any other information aside from the fingerprint, or partial fingerprint, and therefore must determine an identity with only the biometric data. This process utilizes a large back-end database to compare individual unique features of a fingerprint and to find probable matches among a stored database of fingerprint templates. This process is time intensive and expensive and is not often used in a commercial setting.

Biometric security systems are as unique as fingerprints.  Yet, good biometric systems combine the use of fingerprint templates with liveness detection to validate the identity of the right individual. Successful biometric systems are designed in accordance with the specific use case and with the desired results in mind: secure, convenient and reliable authentication that properly verifies the right individuals and rejects the wrong.

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Smash hits the
Nintendo Switch

Super Smash Bros. delivers what the fans wanted in the latest “Ultimate” instalment, writes BRYAN TURNER.

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Super Smash Bros. Ultimate, the latest addition to the popular Nintendo Smash series, has landed on the Nintendo Switch with a bang, selling 5-million copies in the first week of its release. The game has been long-anticipated since the console’s release, as many fans consider iy to be a Nintendo staple. And the wait was well worth it.

It features 74 playable fighters, 108 stages, almost 1300 Spirit characters to collect while playing, and a single-player Adventure mode that took about three days (or 28 hours) of gameplay to complete. The game offers far more gameplay than its predecessors, making it the Smash game that gives its players the best bang for their buck.

For those new to the game, the goal is to fight opponents and build up their damage score (draining their health) to knock them off the stage eventually. This makes the game seem chaotic, as many players jump around the platforms as if they were on quicksand, in order to avoid being hit by the other players.

It also services two kinds of players: the competitive and the casual.

Competitive players can be matched on the online service by skill ranking to enjoy playing with similarly high-skilled opponents. This is especially important in e-sports training for the game, and for players wanting to master combos against other human players. The casual gamer is also catered for, with eight-player chaos and button-mashing to see who comes out luckiest. This segment is also important for those wanting to learn how to play.

Training mode is also a place to go for those learning to play. It offers “CPU” players that are graded by intensity to train as a single player to learn a character’s moves, combos and general fighting style. More challenging CPU players can also be used by competitive players to train when there isn’t a Wi-Fi connection available.

Direct Play features in this game, allowing two players with two Switch consoles to play against each other over a direct connection – no Wi-Fi needed. This is especially useful to those who want to have a social gaming element on the go, similar to that of the cable connector of the Gameboy.

Click here to read Bryan Turner review of Super Smash Bros. Ultimate.

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Win Funko Fortnite in Vinyl

Gadget and Gammatek have nine Funko Fortnite figurines to give away.

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A Funko Pop figurine based on a character set is indicative of reaching the heights of pop culture. It is no surprise, then, that the world’s biggest online game, Fortnite, has its own line of Funko Pop figurines. The Funkos are modeled on the characters in game, including Drift, Ragnarok, Dark Vanguard, Volar, Tracera Ops, and Sparkle Specialist.

Now, local Funko distributor Gammatek has released the Fortnite figurines in South Africa. To celebrate, Gadget and Gammatek are giving away a set of three Funko Fortnite figurines to each of three readers (9 figurines in total). To enter, first click on your favourite Funko Pop on the next page and post the Tweet that appears. Then, follow Gadget on Twitter.

You can put the tweet in your own words, but entries must have the competition’s hashtag (#FunkoFortnite) and mention @GadgetZA to be considered valid.

Click here to select the Funko Fortnite character you want to tweet.

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