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How tech has taken printing into new era

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Printing technology has made significant strides in recent years. Designed to provide consumers with a more convenient, efficient, and eco-friendly user experience, the print industry is buzzing with the latest innovations, writes Timothy Thomas, Consumer Channel Sales Manager at Epson SA.

Technology is constantly evolving to meet growing market needs and improving how people accomplish tasks – whether at home or in the office – and the print industry is no exception. From systems designed to help users save money on monthly overheads, to innovative ideas that contribute towards a greener planet, printing technology has made significant strides in recent years. Here are just four innovations that have recently made a major impact on the printing industry.

  1. Ink tank technology – The introduction of ink tank technology caused a shift in the industry that saw printing for small or home-based business become a great deal more cost-efficient and eco-friendly. This ultra-low-cost printing solution is designed to increase print capacity without compromising on quality, with a variety of ink tank options available on the market. Epson, a leading tech brand across the globe, was the first to introduce its EcoTank ITS printers to South Africa in 2014.

The Epson EcoTank range reduces printing costs by up to 90%, and comes with up to three years’ worth of ink included in each box – that’s the equivalent of up to 60 cartridges worth of ink. With the innovative ink tank systems, users can print as much as 14,000 pages in black and white and 11,200 pages in colour before needing to refill. Users welcomed the move, particularly small business owners relying on bulk-printing solutions.

  1. The rise of 3D printing – Once people mastered the art of two-dimensional printing on flat sheets of paper, the next logical step was of course to create a way to bring those prints to life. Using raw materials such as plastic, metal and glass, 3D printers turn digital files containing 3D data into three-dimension renderings using an innovative ‘layering’ process.

The technology was first introduced in the early 1990s and intended mainly for commercial use, but 3D printers are becoming a lot more affordable to the mainstream market. While their uses are virtually endless, with applications from spare car parts made on demand and architectural design, home furniture, jewellery and novelty items, they could one day even drive the democratisation of industry and their full potential remains to be seen.

  1. Kinder to the environment – Whatever the scale of digital innovation, there will always be a need for hard copy prints in a variety of environments – whether it’s official documents in the workplace or photographs of your favourite family memories at home. However, there are ways to lessen the impact that printing has on the environment without having to do away with it completely.

For instance, the toner found in laser printers uses tiny plastic particles that are heated up to melting point, a process consuming considerable energy, and limits the recyclability of printed material. Ink tank systems are not only a cost-effective solution, but also help conserve the environment by utilising inks that are easy to break down in the recycling process.

In addition, innovative papermaking systems like Epson’s ‘PaperLab’ (not currently available in SA) allow businesses and government offices to recycle waste paper without using water[, where it would ordinarily require about a cup of water to make just a single A4 sheet of paper. The waterless system also allows businesses to produce paper of various sizes, thicknesses, colours and even scents on-site, optimising the paper delivery and purchasing process.

  1. Wi-Fi capabilityPrinters that allow users to connect and print wirelessly are by no means a revelation, but this functionality is still one of the biggest conveniences to happen within the industry. Considering the ubiquity of smart phones and other devices, not to mention the growth in popularity of platforms like Instagram, having a quick and convenient way to print straight from your device makes a world of difference, especially for the busy, on-the-go consumer.

Users can easily connect all their devices to a wireless printer without the use of pesky wires that get in the way, with the added benefit of being able to print from the next room or lounging by the pool across the country. For those who prefer having all their documents, pictures and even event tickets stored on their smart phones in the palm of their hands, wireless printing is one of the greatest innovations to hit the market.

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Legion gets a pro makeover

Lenovo’s latest Legion gaming laptop, the Y530, pulls out all the stops to deliver a sleek looking computer at a lower price point, writes BRYAN TURNER

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Gaming laptops have become synonymous with thick bodies, loud fans, and rainbow lights. Lenovo’s latest gaming laptop is here to change that.

The unit we reviewed housed an Intel Core i7-8750H, with an Nvidia GeForce GTX 1060 GPU. It featured dual storage, one bay fitted with a Samsung 256GB NVMe SSD and the other with a 1TB HDD.

The latest addition to the Legion lineup has become far more professional-looking, compared to the previous generation Y520. This trend is becoming more prevalent in the gaming laptop market and appeals to those who want to use a single device for work and play. Instead of sporting flashy colours, Lenovo has opted for an all-black computer body and a monochromatic, white light scheme. 

The laptop features an all-metal body with sharp edges and comes in at just under 24mm thick. Lenovo opted to make the Y530’s screen lid a little shorter than the bottom half of the laptop, which allowed for more goodies to be packed in the unit while still keeping it thin. The lid of the laptop features Legion branding that’s subtly engraved in the metal and aligned to the side. It also features a white light in the O of Legion that glows when the computer is in use.

The extra bit of the laptop body facilitates better cooling. Lenovo has upgraded its Legion fan system from the previous generation. For passive cooling, a type of cooling that relies on the body’s build instead of the fans, it handles regular office use without starting up the fans. A gaming laptop with good passive cooling is rare to find and Lenovo has shown that it can be achieved with a good build.

The internal fans start when gaming, as one would expect. They are about as loud as other gaming laptops, but this won’t be a problem for gamers who use headsets.

Click here to read about the screen quality, and how it performs in-game.

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Serious about security? Time to talk ISO 20000

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By EDWARD CARBUTT, executive director at Marval Africa

The looming Protection of Personal Information (PoPI) Act in South Africa and the introduction of the General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) in the European Union (EU) have brought information security to the fore for many organisations. This in addition to the ISO 27001 standard that needs to be adhered to in order to assist the protection of information has caused organisations to scramble and ensure their information security measures are in line with regulatory requirements.

However, few businesses know or realise that if they are already ISO 20000 certified and follow Information Technology Infrastructure Library’s (ITIL) best practices they are effectively positioning themselves with other regulatory standards such as ISO 27001. In doing so, organisations are able to decrease the effort and time taken to adhere to the policies of this security standard.

ISO 20000, ITSM and ITIL – Where does ISO 27001 fit in?

ISO 20000 is the international standard for IT service management (ITSM) and reflects a business’s ability to adhere to best practice guidelines contained within the ITIL frameworks. 

ISO 20000 is process-based, it tackles many of the same topics as ISO 27001, such as incident management, problem management, change control and risk management. It’s therefore clear that if security forms part of ITSM’s outcomes, it should already be taken care of… So, why aren’t more businesses looking towards ISO 20000 to assist them in becoming ISO 27001 compliant?

The link to information security compliance

Information security management is a process that runs across the ITIL service life cycle interacting with all other processes in the framework. It is one of the key aspects of the ‘warranty of the service’, managed within the Service Level Agreement (SLA). The focus is ensuring that the quality of services produces the desired business value.

So, how are these standards different?

Even though ISO 20000 and ISO 27001 have many similarities and elements in common, there are still many differences. Organisations should take cognisance that ISO 20000 considers risk as one of the building elements of ITSM, but the standard is still service-based. Conversely, ISO 27001 is completely risk management-based and has risk management at its foundation whereas ISO 20000 encompasses much more

Why ISO 20000?

Organisations should ask themselves how they will derive value from ISO 20000. In Short, the ISO 20000 certification gives ITIL ‘teeth’. ITIL is not prescriptive, it is difficult to maintain momentum without adequate governance controls, however – ISO 20000 is.  ITIL does not insist on continual service improvement – ISO 20000 does. In addition, ITIL does not insist on evidence to prove quality and progress – ISO 20000 does.  ITIL is not being demanded by business – governance controls, auditability & agility are. This certification verifies an organisation’s ability to deliver ITSM within ITIL standards.

Ensuring ISO 20000 compliance provides peace of mind and shortens the journey to achieving other certifications, such as ISO 27001 compliance.

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