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How insurance is being disrupted

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Many industries, including the insurance sector, are seeing how disruptive technology is changing the way they do business – often forcing companies to re-think their strategies, writes JAQUELINE VAN EEDEN, Insurance Head at Wipro South Africa.

Disruption, once a word used to describe bad behaviour, has now been turned into a revolutionary means of changing the way business is conducted by technology. Insurance is not exempt from this disruption. We are seeing a very clear shift away from traditional means of insurance towards the newer, more evolved methods necessary for maintaining pace in a fast changing, always-on and connected world.

There are typically four main aspects of insurance: product design, pricing and underwriting, distribution and admin, and claims management. This model has been the same for decades and, despite of the increase in product complexity, the insurance business is essentially relying on policy premium income and asset management to function.

However, the rise of disruptive technologies and changed customer mind set is changing this model, and insurance companies are forced to change from product-centric model to customer-centric approach.

Insurers are moving towards customised, usage-based, real-time coverage models and moving away from risk-based underwriting approach to risk management approach. From the beginning, insurance companies have captured lot of data and advancements in big data and analytics, helping insurers in right risk selection, enabling more accuracy than ever before. Legacy interaction methods and distribution channels using call centres and one-on-one visits are being replaced, and  anywhere anytime response to customers is taking top priority. Virtual technology is providing easier and instantaneous ways for clients and insurers to obtain and update information, even enabling seamless and accurate billing via mobile applications.

Emerging digital trends in insurance

There are several trends currently disrupting the insurance industry across the globe, many of which are either technology related or technology driven, which are enabling insurance companies to remain relevant and competitive. African insurance companies are following suit and embracing many of these global trends in the face of a challenging and complex market environment.

Some of the key trends that have been identified are an increased use of Internet of Things (IoT) by insurance companies, the use of Big Data to improve claims processing, an increasing demand on cyber insurance, the emergence of Peer-to-Peer insurance, and a growing focus on mobile applications for interaction between insurers and their customers.

Today’s customer uses the Internet to source quotes and research insurance companies to check for the best deals, yet research shows that most insurance purchases are still happening telephonically or through in-person interaction. Insurers are coming around to the fact that customers prefer online interaction, and are realising the need to adapt their systems accordingly. We will be seeing the progressive simplification of legacy systems to remove the barriers that hinder them from offering a consistent and seamless customer experience.

As the trend for connected and smart devices continues to grow, IoT is fast becoming a transformational driver in insurance industry. Several auto insurers have implemented new models based on vehicle telematics.  The possible applications of connected devices across the industry are extensive and have the potential to revolutionize claims processing, product pricing and fraud detection. Auto insurance industry still worried about the future of insurance connected cars and driverless cars as the manufacturing advancements are going to reduce the risk and there by premiums for insurers. Industry predicts that Auto insurance premiums will go down significantly in the next 10 years due to customer behaviour changes and manufacturing advancements in the industry.

Virtual adoption across the insurance industry has also been vast, and many insurers are actively using or implementing virtual computing for operational flexibility, function standardisation, cost savings, scalability and business agility. Small to mid-market insurers have been seen as early adopters of virtual computing services, which is enabling the ability to deliver faster claims, policy and billing services.

Insurers are facing an all-time low retention rate, backed by growing customer demand and rising concerns about cyber-crime. By not capturing and extracting data accurately, insurers are not able to assess their business positioning and the associated business risks fully, including security breaches. Insurers are being forced to make operational changes which will enable them to make better use of their data, for the purpose of retaining business and staying ahead.

Traditionally insurance is sold than bought. With advancement in technology customers have multiple options and they are demanding changes in the behaviour of insurers to have multiple touch points now compared to the past. Insurers are migrating and upgrading their legacy systems, by automating and digitising core systems. Insurers are seeing the benefits of improved efficiency and customer interaction at multiple touch points. Legacy system transformation has been slow in Africa due to perceived high costs and lengthy implementation timelines. However, many are quickly realising that the longer they wait, the more customers they risk losing, adding to their lag behind competitors.

Insurance companies are embracing these trends and looking at more innovative ways they can attract and maintain customer retention. They are remaining up to date and very interactive with what is happening, even exploring radical game changing technology such as the blockchain.

Disruptive technology is creating new insurance services

With the advent of technologies like IoT, we are seeing an emergence of new services. Connected home technologies are enabling people to stay in touch with things like their home security systems, which is reducing risk for insurers who offer home insurance. Wearable technology is enabling health insurers to keep real-time tabs on the health and wellbeing of their customers, again mitigating risk.

We are seeing the biggest impact in the use of Big Data, though. Insurers are discovering the multiple benefits that the wealth of information available from sources such as social media is delivering. Using this information, they are able to tailor their products based on customer preferences and even offer customised rewards programs, increasing sales and customer retention significantly. It is also enabling easier and more streamlined claims processing, as information is recorded, and centrally stored and accessed.

Of course, the mobile trend, particularly in Africa, is making possible the use of apps, not only to smooth insurer and customer interaction, but also to track things like customer fitness, health and even wealth status. Applications are opening up a world of possibility for insurers everywhere.

Insurance in Africa vs the World

In South Africa, lot of importance is placed on things like life insurance, private medical aid car insurance. The rest of Africa, however, sees insurance as less necessary. This means that insurers who operate in Africa need to be more agile, identifying ways in which they can appeal to the African market and delivering them with speed.

Quick, Easy, Instant, Flexible Insurance is very attractive to the African market. An example of such an initiative is currently being investigated by a South African Insurer who is moving into the Nigerian market. They identified a need for taxi drivers to have medical and insurance cover specifically for while they are in transit. Taxi drivers will be able to purchase insurance making use of USSID or a smart phone application enabling cover only for the time that they are travelling from collection point to destination – an attractive and cost effective proposition for the transport business

This is just one of the many ways in which insurance is changing and being impacted by technology. Insurers, typically entrenched in tradition thanks to its association with stability and reliability, do need to realise that the market has changed. It’s time to embrace technology and disrupt the way insurance works for longevity.

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Huawei Mate 20 unveils ‘higher intelligence’

The new Mate 20 series, launching in South Africa today, includes a 7.2″ handset, and promises improved AI.

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Huawei Consumer Business Group today launches the Huawei Mate 20 Series in South Africa.

The phones are powered by Huawei’s densest and highest performing system on chip (SoC) to date, the Kirin 980. Manufactured with the 7nm process, incorporating the Cortex-A76-based CPU and Mali-G76 GPU, the SoC offers improved performance and, according to Huawei, “an unprecedented smooth user experience”.

The new 40W Huawei SuperCharge, 15W Huawei Wireless Quick Charge, and large batteries work in tandem to provide users with improved battery life. A Matrix Camera System includes a  Leica Ultra Wide Angle Lens that lets users see both wider and closer, with a new macro distance capability. The camera system adopts a Four-Point Design that gives the device a distinct visual identity.

The Mate 20 Series is available in 6.53-inch, 6.39-inch and 7.2-inch sizes, across four devices: Huawei Mate 20, Mate 20 Pro, Mate 20 X and Porsche Design Huawei Mate 20 RS. They ship with the customisable Android P-based EMUI 9 operating system.

“Smartphones are an important entrance to the digital world,” said Richard Yu, CEO of Huawei Consumer BG, at the global launch in London last week. “The Huawei Mate 20 Series is designed to be the best ‘mate’ of consumers, accompanying and empowering them to enjoy a richer, more fulfilled life with their higher intelligence, unparalleled battery lives and powerful camera performance.”

The SoC fits 6.9 billion transistors within a die the size of a fingernail. Compared to Kirin 970, the latest chipset is equipped with a CPU that is claimed to be 75 percent more powerful, a GPU that is 46 percent more powerful and an NPU (neural processing unit) that is 226 percent more powerful. The efficiency of the components has also been elevated: the CPU is claimed to be 58 percent more efficient, the GPU 178 percent more efficient, and the NPU 182 percent more efficient. The Kirin 980 is the world’s first commercial SoC to use the Cortex-A76-based cores.

Huawei has designed a three-tier architecture that consists of two ultra-large cores, two large cores and four small cores. This allows the CPU to allocate the optimal amount of resources to heavy, medium and light tasks for greater efficiency, improving the performance of the SoC while enhancing battery life. The Kirin 980 is also the industry’s first SoC to be equipped with Dual-NPU, giving it higher On-Device AI processing capability to support AI applications.

Read more about the Mate 20 Pro’s connectivity, battery and camera on the next page. 

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How Quantum computing will change … everything?

Research labs, government agencies (NASA) and tech giants like Microsoft, IBM and Google are all focused on developing quantum theories first put forward in the 1970s. What’s more, a growing start-up quantum computing ecosystem is attracting hundreds of millions of investor dollars. Given this scenario, Forrester believes it is time for IT leaders to pay attention.

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“We expect CIOs in life sciences, energy, defence, and manufacturing to see a deluge of hype from vendors and the media in the coming months,” says Forrester’s Brian Hopkins, VP, principal analyst serving CIOs and lead author of a report: A First Look at Quantum Computing. “Financial services, supply-chain, and healthcare firms will feel some of this as well. We see a market emerging, media interest on the rise, and client interest trickling in. It’s time for CIOs to take notice.”

The Forrester report gives some practical applications for quantum computing which helps contextualise its potential: 

  • Security could massively benefit from quantum computing. Factoring very large integers could break RSA-encrypted data, but could also be used to protect systems against malicious attempts. 
  • Supply chain managers could use quantum computing to gather and act on price information using minute-by-minute fluctuations in supply and demand 
  • Robotics engineers could determine the best parameters to use in deep-learning models that recognise and react to objects in computer vision
  • Quantum computing could be used to discover revolutionary new molecules making use of the petabytes of data that studies are now producing. This would significantly benefit many organisations in the material and life sciences verticals – particularly those trying to create more cost-effective electric car batteries which still depend on expensive and rare materials. 

Continue reading to find out how Quantum computing differs.

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