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New Wi-Fi software separates data traffic from control traffic

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Ruckus Wireless has developed the Virtual SmartZone Data Plane, a virtual data plane for Wi-Fi that separates data traffic from control traffic on large wireless networks.

Carriers and enterprises will now have maximum flexibility in network deployments, installing multiple data flow managers across a distributed network to help optimise cost and performance based on user demands.

The new software – called Virtual SmartZone Data Plane (vSZ-D) – works with Ruckus’ Virtual SmartZone controllers, which provide a software-based system for managing wireless networks. Virtual SmartZone has built strong market momentum in just one year, with more than 700 customers in production networks – managing more than 200,000 access points. Virtual SmartZone is an early highlight in the industry’s network functions virtualization (NFV) movement, which encapsulates key network functions in software that can run on industry-standard hardware.

“Ruckus is once again leading the way in Wi-Fi innovation, making it easier for carriers and enterprises to virtualise and optimise their networks,” said Greg Beach, vice president of product management at Ruckus. “Separating control and data traffic delivers significant flexibility, cost and performance advantages for networks that support thousands of devices and access points.”

Virtual SmartZone Data Plane provides a flexible, cost-effective approach to aggregate and tunnel end-user data for specific application or security policy needs. Tunneling traditionally drives up cost and lowers performance, requiring expensive physical controllers to be replicated at each site – while increasing hardware and labour costs as the network grows. By contrast, vSZ-D distributes the workload across multiple, inexpensive systems – requiring only a single controller instance along with inexpensive vSZ-D deployments at remote sites. Data also moves faster because it can bypass the controller with only incremental impact on each site.

Functionally, the vSZ-D is manageable by the Virtual SmartZone controller, while enabling independent scaling of control and data planes. Multiple vSZ-D instances can be deployed at distributed sites – or an instance can be deployed centrally, helping to afford maximum network design flexibility. The NFV-based design eliminates deployment limitations due to physical computer hardware and geographic location. Virtual SmartZone controllers feature a tremendous level of flexibility: scaling up to 300,000 devices, offering single and multi-tenancy, and enabling “WiFi-as-you-grow” for networks to expand and adapt to the changing needs of their business. The SmartZone software platform supports all of Ruckus’ ZoneFlex indoor and outdoor wireless access points.

Key vSZ-D product features include:

·         Encrypted data tunneling: Provides flexible options for data tunneling from all types of Virtual LANs (VLANs), including guest traffic encryption; point of sale data tunneling for PCI compliance; VoIP traffic tunneling; and seamless roaming across Layer 2 subnets.

·         Dynamic data plane scaling: Provides scale and resiliency for large deployments supporting 1Gbps, 10Gbps or higher throughput – which can be dynamically tuned without needing software updates.

·         Cluster architecture: Provides scale and resiliency for large deployments supporting up to 30,000 access points and 300,000 devices. One Virtual SmartZone controller can manage up to two vSZ-D instances, and four-controller cluster can manage up to 8 vSZ-D instances.

·         Support for multiple hypervisors: Provides initial support for two of the industry’s most widely deployed virtualisation engines – VMware vSphere and KVM (OpenStack).

vSZ-D is immediately available as an extension to Ruckus’ existing Virtual SmartZone controllers – offered in a “high scale” version (vSZ-H) for carriers and large enterprises, and an “essentials” version (vSZ-E) for large and mid-size enterprises. Virtual SmartZone software extends the Smart Wi-Fi technology that has made Ruckus so popular, including proprietary breakthroughs such as BeamFlex+ adaptive antenna technology, ChannelFly predictive channel selection, SmartMesh self-optimised network meshing and Dynamic PSK Wi-Fi security – all of which help Ruckus deliver reliable, secure and scalable high-performance Wi-Fi for enterprise and service providers.

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Huawei Mate 20 unveils ‘higher intelligence’

The new Mate 20 series, launching in South Africa today, includes a 7.2″ handset, and promises improved AI.

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Huawei Consumer Business Group today launches the Huawei Mate 20 Series in South Africa.

The phones are powered by Huawei’s densest and highest performing system on chip (SoC) to date, the Kirin 980. Manufactured with the 7nm process, incorporating the Cortex-A76-based CPU and Mali-G76 GPU, the SoC offers improved performance and, according to Huawei, “an unprecedented smooth user experience”.

The new 40W Huawei SuperCharge, 15W Huawei Wireless Quick Charge, and large batteries work in tandem to provide users with improved battery life. A Matrix Camera System includes a  Leica Ultra Wide Angle Lens that lets users see both wider and closer, with a new macro distance capability. The camera system adopts a Four-Point Design that gives the device a distinct visual identity.

The Mate 20 Series is available in 6.53-inch, 6.39-inch and 7.2-inch sizes, across four devices: Huawei Mate 20, Mate 20 Pro, Mate 20 X and Porsche Design Huawei Mate 20 RS. They ship with the customisable Android P-based EMUI 9 operating system.

“Smartphones are an important entrance to the digital world,” said Richard Yu, CEO of Huawei Consumer BG, at the global launch in London last week. “The Huawei Mate 20 Series is designed to be the best ‘mate’ of consumers, accompanying and empowering them to enjoy a richer, more fulfilled life with their higher intelligence, unparalleled battery lives and powerful camera performance.”

The SoC fits 6.9 billion transistors within a die the size of a fingernail. Compared to Kirin 970, the latest chipset is equipped with a CPU that is claimed to be 75 percent more powerful, a GPU that is 46 percent more powerful and an NPU (neural processing unit) that is 226 percent more powerful. The efficiency of the components has also been elevated: the CPU is claimed to be 58 percent more efficient, the GPU 178 percent more efficient, and the NPU 182 percent more efficient. The Kirin 980 is the world’s first commercial SoC to use the Cortex-A76-based cores.

Huawei has designed a three-tier architecture that consists of two ultra-large cores, two large cores and four small cores. This allows the CPU to allocate the optimal amount of resources to heavy, medium and light tasks for greater efficiency, improving the performance of the SoC while enhancing battery life. The Kirin 980 is also the industry’s first SoC to be equipped with Dual-NPU, giving it higher On-Device AI processing capability to support AI applications.

Read more about the Mate 20 Pro’s connectivity, battery and camera on the next page. 

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Epic Games brings a
Nite-mare to Android

Epic Games’ decision to not publish games through Google Play inadvertently opens a market to Android virus makers, writes BRYAN TURNER.

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Epic Games, the creator of Fortnite, decided to take the high road by skipping Google Play’s app distribution market and placing a third-party installer for its games on its website. While this is technically fine, it is not recommended for the average user, because allowing third-party installers on one’s smartphone opens up the possibility of non-signed and malicious software to be run on the smartphone. 

In June, malware researchers at ESET warned Android gamers that malicious fake versions of the Fortnite app had been created to steal personal information or damage smartphones. A malware researcher demonstrated how the fake applications works in the Tweet below.

While the decision to bypass Google Play was a bold move on Epic Games’ part, it has been a long time coming for app developers to move their premium apps off Google’s Play Store. The two major app distributors, Google Play and Apple’s App Store, take a 30% cut of every purchase made through their app distribution platforms. 

The App Store is currently the only way to get apps on a non-modified iOS device, which is why Epic Games had no choice for Fortnite to be in the App Store. On the other hand, Android phones can install packages downloaded through the browser, which makes the Play Store almost unnecessary for the gaming company. 

The most interesting part of this development is that Google is not the “bad guy” and Epic Games is no saviour to other game developers. Epic Games is a company with a multi-billion dollar valuation and has resources like large-scale servers to distribute and update its games, a big marketing budget to ensure everyone knows how to get its games, and server security to protect against malware. 

Resources of this scale allow the game company to turn a cold shoulder to Google’s Play Store distribution and focus on its own, in-house solution. 

That said, installing packages without the Google Play Store must be done carefully, and it is essential to do homework on where a package is downloaded. Moreover, when a package is installed outside of the Google Play Store, a security switch to block the installation of third party apps must be turned off. This switch should be turned back on immediately after the third party package is installed. 

This complex amount of steps makes it less worthwhile to install third party apps, in favour of rather waiting for them to reach the Play Store.

From a consumer perspective, ESET recommends not installing packages outside of the Google Play Store and to ignore advertisements to download the game from other sources.

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