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Multimedia reporting takes top online award

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The Vodacom Journalist of the Year Awards saw the top award for online journalism go to an entry that used the medium’s multi-platform potential to the full.

Reporting that made full use of the multi-platform potential of online publishing took the top online award in the Vodacom Journalist of the Year Awards announced on Friday night.

The winner was Kim Harrisberg of Code4SA for News24, for her multimedia reporting on domestic workers’ employment conditions. The entry, entitled Living on the Edge, has it’s own dedicated micro-site at http://livingwage.code4sa.org/.

This year marked the 14th Vodacom Journalist of the Year Awards. The theme, Write Here. Right Now, reflected the speed with which we have seen news stories being generated via electronic platforms directly from the story location. The awards acknowledged that, given the need to be first with a story, journalists must remember that it is excellence in reporting and producing good stories that make for award-winning journalism.

The national Vodacom Journalist of the Year Award, which comes with a R100 000 prize, was awarded for a story that displayed journalism at its very best, said Maya Makanjee, Chief Officer for Corporate Affairs at Vodacom Group.

“For Vodacom, we see the role we play in supporting media through our technology as vital, and this is evidenced by the speed with which stories and photos are shared through various platforms,’ she said. “By linking technology with journalism, we are proud to say that the Vodacom Journalist of the Year Awards remain among the most credible awards in a rapidly changing industry.

“Once again I have been told that our panel of judges had a difficult time choosing the winners. They were presented with outstanding submissions and we are pleased that some of these came from smaller publications and online sites. Next year we hope to see even more entries from a wide range of media platforms.”

Vodacom Journalist of the Year Award

The 2015 overall National Vodacom Journalist of the Year Award was given to two journalists from the Gauteng Province who covered the Killing of Emmanuel Sithole for the Sunday Times.

“Our overall winners are examples of the synthesis of great media coverage. Without the determined coverage of this photographer and this journalist, South Africa and the world would never have known of the casual yet targeted brutality of the killing of Emmanuel Sithole,” said Mary Payayya, convenor of the judging panel.

Beauregard Tromp and James Oatway of the Sunday Times share the 2015 Vodacom Journalist of the Year Award and the prize of R100 000.

Entries were received in 12 categories this year: CSI/Sustainability, Editor’s Choice, Financial/Economic, Online, Photography, Sport, Print Feature, Print News, Radio Feature, Radio News, Television Feature and Television News.

“The judging panel this year had to make hard choices and we thank Mary Papayya, Elna Rossouw, Collin Nxumalo, Arthur Goldstuck, Albe Grobbelaar, Ryland Fisher, Megan Rusi, and Patricia McCracken, who made their time and expertise available to us,” said Makanjee.

The national winners in the various categories are as follows, with winners per category taking home R10 000.  If there is more than one winner, the prizes are shared.

The winners of the 2015 Vodacom Journalist of the Year Awards nationally are:

2015 Radio Feature

As in previous years, this was a strongly contested award. Ultimately the judges found that the key components of script originality, creativity in production and research were observed by most entries. The winner went above and beyond – taking breaking news stories and presenting them to the listener with great care and skill while also showing credible reporting and analysis. The winner of the National 2015 Radio Feature Award is Minoshni Pillay of SABC Radio News for a two part series Camp Life.

2015 Radio News

This is another highly contested category with all finalists giving a good perspective of the key stories being broadcast over radio in South Africa. The finalists could all have been winners. The national prize is shared by two journalists for relentless and committed coverage from start to finish. They are Minoshni Pillay of SABC Radio News for two stories namely, The Murder of Baby Jamie; and the Return of the Remains of SA Journalist Nat Nakasa 50 Years After His Death; and VumaniMkhize of EWN for Bafana Bafana Captain Murdered.

2015 TV Feature

This entry is a victory for consumer journalism told very effectively through the medium of television. It demonstrates a thorough investigation into the legalities and finances of the complex process of personal injury claims and how they get abused. Excellent interviewing skills made the weaknesses of the respondent’s argument clearly visible to the viewer. The winner is Joy Summers for Bobbroff’s Fall from Grace produced for Carte Blanche.

2015 TV News

All entrants in this category were potential winners. The stories gave insight into the country’s news landscape and the stories critical to South Africa. However, there was one story that captured the world’s attention. The TV news winner for 2015 is Philip Owira of eNCA for a brilliant piece on Rhodes has Fallen.

2015 Print Feature

Our features finalists gave us hope and made us laugh, but they also exposed the darker underbelly of South African society. The winner stood head-and-shoulders above the rest. The award goes to Maygene Prins of Die Burger for her insightful articles on George ‘Geweld’ Thomas.

2015 Print News

It was a year of big news stories covering crimes of passion, corruption and hostage dramas, but a theme that has dominated the news throughout the year has been the issue of xenophobia. The winner wrote his story not only because he was at the right place at the right time, but also because of extensive background investigative work. The winner is Beauregard Tromp of the Sunday Times for his reporting on the Killing of Emmanuel Sithole in Alexandria Township.

2015 Photography

The best news photography depends on the electric combination of a historic moment that is accurately, yet emotively depicted, thanks to split-second decisions on technical issues such as composition and lighting to F-stop and angle. This year’s national winner calibrated all of this mentally while directing his camera to document horrific events unfolding just five meters away from where he stood. The award goes to James Oatway of the Sunday Times for The Killing of Emmanuel Sithole.

2015 Financial/Economic

The best financial and economic reporting combines detailed assessment of facts with clear and deep analysis. Combining news reporting with crisply observed contextual development, the winner produced a well-researched piece with disturbingly accurate conclusions. The award goes to Claire Bisseker of the Financial Mail for SA’s Friday the 13th.

2015 CSI/Sustainability

The national winner is a public-interest story of the highest calibre. It pours intense investigative and analytical effort into a perceptive and far-seeing analysis of how we must act now to prevent the next resources crisis to hit South Africa. The joint winners are Phillip de Wet, Sipho Kings, Sarah Wild, and Rapula Moatshe of the Mail & Guardian for SA’s Great Thirst Has Begun.

2015 Online

Reporting that makes full use of the multi-platform potential of online publishing remains largely underexploited in South African media. For an excellent example of multimedia reporting on the issue of domestic workers’ employment conditions, the winner is Kim Harrisberg of Code4SA for News24 for Living on the Edge.

2015 Sports

Choosing a winner in this fiercely contested category was no easy task. The dedication, commitment, and persistence paid off and resulted in a series of stories that went to the core of good investigative journalism. Congratulations to BonganiFuzile of the Daily Dispatch for exposing so many of the wrong-doings and ‘shenanigans’ in the top echelons of rugby in a body of work on the state of Border Rugby.

Editor’s Choice Award

The Editor’s Choice Award seeks to identify a young journalist, nominated by his or her editor for outstanding work and showing great promise. It honours a young reporter who shows the potential to become a great journalist. The judges interviewed nominees from across the country and were impressed by most, but no one impressed them more than this year’s winner, Yusuf Omar from eNCA. Omar will join the Thomson Foundation in the United Kingdom for The Summer Convergence Course in August next year. Participating journalists will each be provided with one week’s work experience at a British media organisation during the final week of the course. All expenses are paid for by Vodacom.

Lifetime Achiever Award

This award honours a journalist who has made a significant lifetime contribution to the media in South Africa. This year the judges were unanimous in their choice of Leslie Sehume, known in the trade as Bra Les. Sehume worked across a number of titles during his career and was known as a man who did not tolerate mistakes in copy. A hard task-master, many of South Africa’s most well-known journalists credit him with teaching them how to be meticulous writers and searchers for the truth. He was passionate about sport and in particular boxing.

Makanjee said, “This year has been a celebration of excellence with great stories being entered into the Awards. From entries telling the everyday tales of human life, to massive breaking stories, we saw entries from journalists who looked beyond the obvious and found jewels.”

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How we use phones to avoid human contact

A recent study by Kaspersky Lab has found that 75% of people pick up their connected device to avoid conversing with another human being.

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Connected devices are becoming essential to keeping people in contact with each other, but for many they are also a much-needed comfort blanket in a variety of social situations when they do not want to interact with others. A recent survey from Kaspersky Lab has confirmed this trend in behaviour after three-quarters of people (75%) admitted they use a device to pretend to be busy when they don’t want to talk to someone else, showing the importance of keeping connected devices protected under all circumstances. 

Imagine you’ve arrived at a bar and you’re waiting for your date. The bar is busy, and people are chatting all around you. What do you do now? Strike up a conversation with someone you don’t know? Grab your phone from your pocket or handbag until your date arrives to keep yourself busy? Why talk to humans or even make eye-contact with someone else when you can stare at your connected device instead?

The truth is, our use of devices is making it much easier to avoid small talk or even be polite to those around us, and new Kaspersky Lab research has found that 72% of people use one when they do not know what to do in a social situation. They are also the ‘go-to’ distraction for people even when they aren’t trying to look busy or avoid someone’s eye. 46% of people admit to using a device just to kill time every day and 44% use it as a daily distraction.

In addition to just being a distraction, devices are also a lifeline to those who would rather not talk directly to another person in day-to-day situations, to complete essential tasks. In fact, nearly a third (31%) of people would prefer to carry out tasks such as ordering a taxi or finding directions to where they need to go via a website and an app, because they find it an easier experience than speaking with another person.

Whether they are helping us avoid direct contact or filling a void in our daily lives, our constant reliance on devices has become a cause for panic when they become unusable. A third (34%) of people worry that they will not be able to entertain themselves if they cannot access a connected device. 12% are even concerned that they won’t be able to pretend to be busy if their device is out of action.

Dmitry Aleshin, VP for Product Marketing, Kaspersky Lab said, “The reliance on connected devices is impacting us in more ways than we could have ever expected. There is no doubt that being connected gives us the freedom to make modern life easier, but devices are also vital to help people get through different and difficult social situations. No matter what your ‘connection crutch’ is, it is essential to make sure your device is online and available when you need it most.”

To ensure your device lifeline is always there and in top health – no matter what the reason or situation – Kaspersky Security Cloud keeps your connection safe and secure:

·         I want to use my device while waiting for a friend – is it secure to access the bar’s Wi-Fi?

With Kaspersky Security Cloud, devices are protected against network threats, even if the user needs to use insecure public Wi-Fi hotspots. This is done through transferring data via an encrypted channel to ensure personal data safety, so users’ devices are protected on any connection.

·         Oh no! I’m bored but my phone’s battery is getting low – what am I going to do?

Users can track their battery level thanks to a countdown of how many minutes are left until their device shuts down in the Kaspersky Security Cloud interface. There is also a wide-range of portable power supplies available to keep device batteries charged while on-the-go.

·         I’ve lost my phone! How will I keep myself entertained now?

Should the unthinkable happen and you lose or have your phone stolen, Kaspersky Security Cloud can track and protect your device from data breaches, for complete peace of mind. Remote lock and locate features ensure your device remains secure until you are reunited.

 

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Five key biometric facts

Due to their uniqueness, fingerprints are being used more and more to quickly identify and ensure the security of customers. CLAUDE LANGLEY, Regional Sales Manager, for Africa at HID Global Biometrics, outlines five facts about the technology.

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How many times in a day are you expected to identify yourself? From when you arrive at work you are required to sign in, visiting your bank, receiving healthcare services… The list is endless. When a system knows who you are, you are able to do any number common, everyday activities. Your identity is unique and precious. It is also easily stolen and the target of many hackers across the globe. Technology is constantly evolving alongside the criminal element, always looking for ways to protect data and identity. One such solution happens to be biometrics and it is rapidly gaining traction in our increasingly complex modern world.

Reliable, secure and fundamentally YOU, unique biometric traits such as fingerprints are being used by banks, enterprises and consumers to verify identity. Biometric solutions offer significant identity protection because they use unique biological details to ensure an account is only accessed by the account holder, a door only opened by the owner. Here are five things that are little known about this technology…

  • The uncut identity. Your fingerprint is unique to you. Nobody can use a copy of it to impersonate you. Good technology is capable of scanning down into the layers of the fingertip to differentiate unique elements of a person’s fingerprint, this data is then encrypted and used as a key to unlocking whichever physical or virtual door that the biometric system protects.
  • The living proof. No, there is nothing to the stories of fingerprints being used without their owner’s knowledge or permission. Biometric solutions can use specific variables to determine if the finger used to access the system is that of a present, living person.  A copy or a fake cannot be used to access a cutting-edge biometric solution.
  • Easy and convenient. Queues and documents and paperwork may well be a thing of the past should biometrics take a firmer grip of government and banking systems. The process of registering is easy, and access to identity documents and records is yours alone.
  • Security blanket. A thousand passwords and a hundred post-it notes stuck on walls and drawers.  An excel file with a list of sites and applications and their corresponding passwords, all a thing of the past.  Nobody needs to remember their password with biometrics, they only need to show up.
  • Anywhere is cool. Schools, airports, networks, offices, homes, toilets, banks, libraries, governments, border controls, immigration services, call centres, hospitals and even clubs and pubs – knowing “who” matters and biometrics can quickly and conveniently confirm your identity where needed.

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