Connect with us

Featured

Workstations for creators

Published

on

Dell has recently announced updated to its Precision 7000 range of Mobile Workstations. The new offerings feature Intel’s new Xeon processors, which will deliver up to 20% more performance across a range of worlds.

The Dell Precision 7000 series Mobile Workstations, 7510 and 7710 will offer two of the recently announced Intel Xeon processors, the E3-1545 v5 and E3-1575 v5, which will deliver up to 20 percent better performance than the previous processors across a breadth of single and multi-threaded workloads. These Intel Xeon processors are the most powerful in our mobile line-up and allow each core and compute thread to access 128MB of additional embedded on-package memory support with Iris Pro graphics efficiency and also includes hardware-enhanced security and manageability capabilities to better secure data and lower operational costs.

Faster memory, no problem. Due to close work with our partners, the 7510 and 7710 mobile workstations will also be the only workstations to offer SuperSpeed memory, which features up to 32GB of DDR4 2667MHz memory and allows the workstations to out preform their predecessors by 23 percent. Other upgrades being announced include, the Dell 5510 Precision Mobile Workstation receiving an i5-6440HQ processor and Dell’s Reliable Memory Technology Pro availability on the 3510, 7510 & 7710 mobile workstations with ECC memory support to help ensure precious data is protected. These unique innovations will give users the ability to render dense computer-aided engineering workloads more quickly and efficiently than ever before. When doing multi-thread or multi-core work, these workstations will be able to leverage the extra memory and engineers will be able to easily handle computations with crazy high calculation counts.

Just imagine the time saved in the production studio or the architecture firm with faster processing and higher frequency that will be enabled by the memory. With this update, we’re delivering on the immediate needs we’ve been hearing from customers and it supports our continued momentum for delivering the right solutions for professional creators with Dell Precision.

Earlier this spring, we revealed configurations for virtual reality commercial PCs, introducing our first VR-ready Precision Tower Workstations. The Dell Precision Tower Workstations and Rack 7910 were upgraded with the new Intel Xeon E5-2600 processors (Broadwell), which offer more cores and performance for multi-threaded applications that are ideal for professional modeling, analysis, and calculations. Dell Precision Workstations were also behind the powerful animation of the recent “Angry Birds The Movie.”

Featured

Samsung unfolds the future

At the #Unpacked launch, Samsung delivered the world’s first foldable phone from a major brand. ARTHUR GOLDSTUCK tried it out.

Published

on

Everything that could be known about the new Samsung Galaxy S10 range, launched on Wednesday in San Francisco, seems to have been known before the event.

Most predictions were spot-on, including those in Gadget (see our preview here), thanks to a series of leaks so large, they competed with the hole an iceberg made in the Titanic.

The big surprise was that there was a big surprise. While it was widely expected that Samsung would announce a foldable phone, few predicted what would emerge from that announcement. About the only thing that was guessed right was the name: Galaxy Fold.

The real surprise was the versatility of the foldable phone, and the fact that units were available at the launch. During the Johannesburg event, at which the San Francisco launch was streamed live, small groups of media took turns to enter a private Fold viewing area where photos were banned, personal phones had to be handed in, and the Fold could be tried out under close supervision.

The first impression is of a compact smartphone with a relatively small screen on the front – it measures 4.6-inches – and a second layer of phone at the back. With a click of a button, the phone folds out to reveal a 7.3-inch inside screen – the equivalent of a mini tablet.

The fold itself is based on a sophisticated hinge design that probably took more engineering than the foldable display. The result is a large screen with no visible seam.

The device introduces the concept of “app continuity”, which means an app can be opened on the front and, in mid-use, if the handset is folded open, continue on the inside from where the user left off on the front. The difference is that the app will the have far more space for viewing or other activity.

Click here to read about the app experience on the inside of the Fold.

Previous Page1 of 4

Continue Reading

Featured

Password managers don’t protect you from hackers

Using a password manager to protect yourself online? Research reveals serious weaknesses…

Published

on

Top password manager products have fundamental flaws that expose the data they are designed to protect, rendering them no more secure than saving passwords in a text file, according to a new study by researchers at Independent Security Evaluators (ISE).

“100 percent of the products that ISE analyzed failed to provide the security to safeguard a user’s passwords as advertised,” says ISE CEO Stephen Bono. “Although password managers provide some utility for storing login/passwords and limit password reuse, these applications are a vulnerable target for the mass collection of this data through malicious hacking campaigns.”

In the new report titled “Under the Hood of Secrets Management,” ISE researchers revealed serious weaknesses with top password managers: 1Password, Dashlane, KeePass and LastPass.  ISE examined the underlying functionality of these products on Windows 10 to understand how users’ secrets are stored even when the password manager is locked. More than 60 million individuals 93,000 businesses worldwide rely on password managers. Click here for a copy of the report.

Password managers are marketed as a solution to eliminate the security risks of storing passwords or secrets for applications and browsers in plain text documents. Having previously examined these and other password managers, ISE researchers expected an improved level of security standards preventing malicious credential extraction. Instead ISE found just the opposite. 

Click here to read the findings from the report.

Previous Page1 of 2

Continue Reading

Trending

Copyright © 2018 World Wide Worx