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Toyota targets child’s play

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Toyota’s recently unveiled Camatte Vision allows children to drive a car or truck using augmented reality. The solution combines a car with adjustable pedals, customisable panels and images of the driver to give a real-life look and feel.

Have you ever wondered how you would look racing to rescue a cat from a tree in a purple fire engine? Or cruising around town in a hot pink hot-dog van? Toyota is making it possible to step into the world of toy cars and trucks with Camatte Vision, a new interactive experience for families, unveiled at the International Tokyo Toy Show last week.

Camatte Vision is part of Toyota’s Camatte series of concepts designed to change the way children play and learn with toy vehicles. Its aim is to provide a way for youngsters and their parents to share in the excitement of cars and trucks.

Using an innovative augmented reality tablet app, you can see how you and your family would look in a vast range of different vehicles and colours. Blazing fast hot rods, life-saving ambulances, chunky construction trucks, and many more are available through the app, all in bright rainbow hues.

As well as the virtual world of Camatte Vision, Toyota has added a genuine nuts-and-bolts member to the Camatte concept family. Called Hajime, it was on display for families to explore at the toy show.

How Camatte Vision works

The first step is for families to get inside Hajime and take a photo of themselves. Using a tablet, Camatte Vision then lets them customise the car’s appearance, mixing and matching 13 body types and 12 colours. Holding the tablet above a road course lay-out shows the vehicle as if in motion, with the family inside.

Camatte Hajime

Although the name Hajime means “beginning” in Japanese, it is actually the sixth member of Toyota’s Camatte family, following the Sora, Daichi, Takumi, 57s and 57s Sports that debuted at previous Tokyo Toy Shows. Hajime was named to signify that the fun has just begun with the Camatte concept and there is much more to come. Building on Camatte’s spirit of customisation-friendly design and fun, Hajime features Camatte’s signature swappable exterior panels, and adjustable pedals and driver’s seat that let children get behind the wheel while their parents are close behind in the two rear seats.

The Camatte Hajime is a real working car – youngsters were able to get inside, buckle up, turn the steering wheel and push the pedals (but not drive off of course!).

* Follow Gadget on Twitter on @GadgetZA

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Samsung unfolds the future

At the #Unpacked launch, Samsung delivered the world’s first foldable phone from a major brand. ARTHUR GOLDSTUCK tried it out.

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Everything that could be known about the new Samsung Galaxy S10 range, launched on Wednesday in San Francisco, seems to have been known before the event.

Most predictions were spot-on, including those in Gadget (see our preview here), thanks to a series of leaks so large, they competed with the hole an iceberg made in the Titanic.

The big surprise was that there was a big surprise. While it was widely expected that Samsung would announce a foldable phone, few predicted what would emerge from that announcement. About the only thing that was guessed right was the name: Galaxy Fold.

The real surprise was the versatility of the foldable phone, and the fact that units were available at the launch. During the Johannesburg event, at which the San Francisco launch was streamed live, small groups of media took turns to enter a private Fold viewing area where photos were banned, personal phones had to be handed in, and the Fold could be tried out under close supervision.

The first impression is of a compact smartphone with a relatively small screen on the front – it measures 4.6-inches – and a second layer of phone at the back. With a click of a button, the phone folds out to reveal a 7.3-inch inside screen – the equivalent of a mini tablet.

The fold itself is based on a sophisticated hinge design that probably took more engineering than the foldable display. The result is a large screen with no visible seam.

The device introduces the concept of “app continuity”, which means an app can be opened on the front and, in mid-use, if the handset is folded open, continue on the inside from where the user left off on the front. The difference is that the app will the have far more space for viewing or other activity.

Click here to read about the app experience on the inside of the Fold.

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Password managers don’t protect you from hackers

Using a password manager to protect yourself online? Research reveals serious weaknesses…

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Top password manager products have fundamental flaws that expose the data they are designed to protect, rendering them no more secure than saving passwords in a text file, according to a new study by researchers at Independent Security Evaluators (ISE).

“100 percent of the products that ISE analyzed failed to provide the security to safeguard a user’s passwords as advertised,” says ISE CEO Stephen Bono. “Although password managers provide some utility for storing login/passwords and limit password reuse, these applications are a vulnerable target for the mass collection of this data through malicious hacking campaigns.”

In the new report titled “Under the Hood of Secrets Management,” ISE researchers revealed serious weaknesses with top password managers: 1Password, Dashlane, KeePass and LastPass.  ISE examined the underlying functionality of these products on Windows 10 to understand how users’ secrets are stored even when the password manager is locked. More than 60 million individuals 93,000 businesses worldwide rely on password managers. Click here for a copy of the report.

Password managers are marketed as a solution to eliminate the security risks of storing passwords or secrets for applications and browsers in plain text documents. Having previously examined these and other password managers, ISE researchers expected an improved level of security standards preventing malicious credential extraction. Instead ISE found just the opposite. 

Click here to read the findings from the report.

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