Connect with us

Featured

Tech changes the user interface of the world

Published

on

Often it feels that the pinnacle of design has been reached, but technology is ever changing and improving. The current pinnacle of innovation comes in the form of the Galaxy Note8, says CRAIGE FLEISCHER, Samsung’s Director of Integrated Mobility.

Some argue that the wheel is mankind’s greatest innovation as it led to mechanisation and industrialisation. But it is the evolution of language and the written word which enabled these advancements in the first place. Skip forward a few hundred years and we find ourselves in the digital era where all our thinking and writing is contained in a series of ones and zeros, every comma and full-stop a perfectly engineered code. This evolution aside, we have never lost the dexterity of holding a pen and etching an idea into existence, or navigating a paint brush on a canvas.

While electronics giants are creating more advanced technologies that aim to simplify our lives, many are overlooking simple ergonomics. Technology is there to complement life, not complicate it. The evolution of the mobile phone makes this ever so clear.

In 1973, all a mobile phone had to do was act like a house phone and connect two users over a distance. In the 2000s we expected phones to remember names, take pictures and play music. It’s 2017 and our appetites have grown exponentially. We demand so much more from our devices, we want bigger screens, improved screen quality, larger storage, faster processors, extended battery time and a longer shelf life. Smartphones heeded this call, but still we ask for more.

The demands include a desktop in my pocket, being able to access spreadsheets and PowerPoint presentations on demand, exceptional picture quality, a personal assistant to be available around the clock, and a platform that can support my creative side. This list of demands requires an integrated solution.

Rising to the challenge, Samsung gave us the Galaxy Note 8. A phablet by definition, due to its size; it is a technological work of art based on its performance capabilities. It boasts a dual camera that is considered the best in the industry. It can capture clear pictures, even in low light, placing it at the cutting edge of capturing stills and videos.

The Galaxy Note 8 has a 6.3-inch Quad HD+ Super AMOLED screen, the biggest on any phablet in the market, complementing those high definition pictures and videos superbly. With an aspect ratio of 18.5:9 and an infinity display, the screen allows us to do great things and the tiniest details are brought to life with the most vivid clarity. The phone’s S Pen stylus brings the immense screen to life-this pen being a distinctive feature of the Note series since its inception in 2011. The S Pen allows us to live message, create our own emojis, edit pictures and documents with a hand-written element, and create our own GIFs. For the artistically inclined, the intelligent S Pen is pressure sensitive, allowing the artist to sketch various hues as if using different pencil types on a sketch pad. But one of the most practical features of the S Pen, is being able to speedily jot down notes without unlocking the phone’s screen.

The Galaxy Note 8 embodies everything modern, it speaks to opulence and productivity. Its 10nm mobile processor and 6 GB RAM makes gaming, watching movies or switching between monitoring the stock market, emails, GPS and other operational apps, a breeze. It is the perfect gadget for those who want more out of their mobile devices, and those who want to do more.

Helping people cope in a digital, fast-paced environment, Samsung makes life easier with Bixby. The artificial intelligence platform is so advanced, that it adapts, learns and grows with us. At the click of a button, we can summon our own personal assistant to help organise meetings, remind us of lunch with our mother or download that live show we had queued, either on our mobile or television.

The rise of the Internet of Things means everyday products such as watches and houses are becoming smart and syncing across devices. Samsung Dex allows us to connect our phone to the television, making file sharing as simple as clicking a button.

The inspiration behind this innovation is to do bigger things for longer, having a positive impact on the world and about a vision for the future. Discover new possibilities and inspire the world to create the future using creativity, innovation and technology.

Continue Reading

Africa News

Smart grids needed for Africa’s utilities

Power utilities across Africa should rethink their business models and how they manage and monetise their assets to keep pace with the changing energy ecosystem, says COLIN BEANEY, Global Industry Director for Asset-intensive and Energy and Utilities at IFS.

Published

on

Africa’s abundant natural resources and urgent need for power mean that it is one of the most exciting and innovative energy markets in a world that is moving rapidly towards clean, renewable energy sources. The continent’s energy industry is taking new approaches to providing unserved and underserved communities with access to power, with an emphasis on smart technologies and greener energy sources.

Power systems are evolving from centralised, top-down systems as interest in off-grid technology grows among African businesses and consumers. And according to PwC, we will see installed power capacity rise from 2012’s 90GW to 380GW in 2040 in sub-Saharan Africa. Power utilities are needing to rethink their business models and how they manage and monetise their assets to keep pace with the changing energy ecosystem.

Energy and utilities providers are transforming from centralised supply companies to more distributed, bi-directional service providers. They can only achieve this through the evolution of “smart grids” where sensors and smart meters will be able to provide the consumer with a more granular level of detail of power usage. This shift from an energy supplier to “lifestyle provider” will require a much more dynamic and optimised approach to maintenance and field service.

African companies must thus embrace digital transformation as an imperative. This transformation begins by embracing enterprise asset management to improve asset utilisation. The subsequent steps are enhancing upstream and downstream supply chain management; resource optimisation; introducing enterprise operational intelligence; embracing new technologies such as the Internet of Things, machine learning, and predictive maintenance; and becoming a smart utility.

Embracing mobility to drive ROI

Getting it right is about putting in place an enterprise backbone that accommodates asset and project management, multinational languages and currencies, new energies and markets, visualisation of the entire value chain, and mobility apps. Mobile technologies that support the field workforce have a vital role to play in driving better ROI from utilities’ investments in enterprise asset management and enterprise resource planning solutions.

Today’s leading enterprise asset management solutions feature powerful functionality for mobile management of the complete workflow of work orders – from logging status changes and updates, from receiving and creating new orders to concluding the job and reporting time, material and expenses. Such solutions are easy to deploy and intuitive for end users to learn and use.

Importantly for organisations operating in parts of the continent with poor telecoms infrastructure, connectivity is not an issue. The solutions work offline and synchronises when network connectivity is available. Users can work on any device—laptops, tablets, and smartphones—commercial or ruggedised.

By ensuring that field technicians have easy access to information and processes, the mobile solution enables technicians and maintenance engineers to easily do the following tasks:

·         Create a new work order on the fly and log new opportunities

·         Access both historical and planned work information when requested

·         Permit customers to sign when the job is completed

·         Capture measurements and inspection notes on route work orders

·         Create new fault reports on routing

·         Facilitate documentation through photo capturing

·         Provide easy access to technical data and preventive actions.

The power of mobility allows the engineer to be the origin of all data capture on a service event. They can easily inquire on asset history, record parts used or parts needed for repair, record labour hours, and expenses as they occur, and any notes of repairs performed. When coupled with workforce management tools, such solutions unlock significant productivity gains for utilities who are trying to get the most from their workforce and assets.

Continue Reading

Featured

Brands fall for app vanity

The experience of a mobile screen full of icons, representing independent apps that your need to open to experience them, is making less sense. Instead, businesses should serve customers with an ‘app-like’ experience inside the digital platform they already use, says PIETER DE VILLIERS, Group CEO at Clickatell.

Published

on

Many brands remain obsessed with creating mobile apps. This not only defies trends that point to increasing consumer app apathy, but can exclude a sizeable portion  of your customers in emerging economies. Companies need to engage with their users where they are rather than forcing them onto an app, in what can only be described as brand vanity. 

In 2017 there were around 2.2 million apps available in the iOS app store and over 3 million on Google Play. And, while the number of apps being downloaded continues to rise, analysis shows that consumers are only using 30 apps per month and accessing just 9 on a day-to-day basis. 

While these numbers still seem attractively high, in reality the majority of the apps we use are for messaging (like Facebook Messenger, WhatsApp, and WeChat) and our social networking, gaming, leisure, dating or utility activities. 

Despite the facts, the application strategy as the holy grail for digital transformation is still being pushed even within large progressive brands. What’s more, some advertising agencies and digital consultants are still pushing apps as the best means for companies to connect with their customers. This has resulted in some organisations stubbornly doubling down on app strategies which are simply not showing return on investment (ROI). 

It’s not immediately clear to us whether the fascination with apps is a roll-over from long overdue projects or whether brand owners equate a mobile-first strategy with a mobile app. Mobile-first in 2018 means customer first, and therefore embracing chat commerce in order to deliver services with convenience and simplicity in mind. 

Why apps won’t win the internet

The problem with apps goes beyond user fatigue. In the first instance, many apps are poorly designed, assuming technical sophistication which may not match reality for the average customer. Poor user interfaces and attempts to provide complex engagement can result in even the best ideas missing their targets due to lack of engagement. 

Secondly, we all know that economic realities drive consumer behaviour. In Africa, new mobile phone users typically opt for feature phones over smartphones. With a longer battery life and a much more accessible price point, feature phones still allow for a basic internet connection, chat platforms like WhatsApp, and call and message functionality. In these regions, the cost of an app – even if it’s free – goes far beyond installing it. Constant updates require reliable and cheap access to the internet. For the average phone owner in an emerging market, this can be a serious challenge. 

Thirdly, and most importantly, apps must be relevant to their intended market. Frequency of usage is a key measure of relevance. 

Apps which are used on a daily basis, like health and fitness trackers, enjoy constant engagement. New features which are added are eagerly awaited by users who are happy to update their apps. 

However, users may well question the relevance of the app if they are required to conduct updates on a monthly or even weekly basis when they are only making use of the app once or twice a year. 

On average, I download one app per quarter. Some I use more frequently than others, but all of these apps need to be regularly updated to maintain security, update features, and fix bugs. Many apps are pushing out updates much more frequently. I noticed over the past year that I could go from having all apps updated, to 32 apps requiring an update in five days.

When it comes to a customer-first digital strategy, companies should be asking themselves if an app is really the best way to reach their target audience. 

In fact, at the end of 2016, Gartner predicted that by 2019, 20 percent of brands would ditch their mobile app. What’s more, in its 2018 predictions, the company forecast that by 2021, more than 50 percent of corporations would spend more per annum on bots and chatbots than on mobile app development. 

So, we need to ask, what is the alternative for CIOs, CDOs, CMOs, and digital leaders who are looking for ways to reach, retain and grow their customer base? 

The logical app alternative 

The old battle advice goes: fight your enemy where they are not. Military strategists agreed that having your enemy come to you and fight you on your own terms was preferable. In a world where customers have access to thousands of offerings and millions of deals online, we need to flip that idea to Meet Your Customers Where They Are. 

Any marketeer will tell you just a how difficult it is to drive app downloads. Development, cross platform testing and user interface aside, the marketing campaign required to get customers to download the app can swallow entire annual budgets and still come up short. 

Looking at the facts, it makes infinitely more sense to work within the digital platforms already being used by your target audience. 

Clickatell is already enabling chat commerce for some of the leading global brands with its Touch solution. This allows organisations to serve their customers with an ‘app-like’ experience inside the chat or browser platform of their customer’s choice (Twitter, Facebook Messenger, etc.) 

Brands can now send an actionable Touch link such as ‘find the nearest ATM’ or ‘reset my password’ within a chat stream that will open an intuitive touch card without the user having to download an app to perform the action. Services can also be linked to the in-app experience for brands not looking to abandon their app efforts. 

Working with our clients, many of whom are global innovators and thought leaders, we’ve found that having the courage to design with an ‘end user first’ approach and dealing with the back-end complexity behind the scenes results in cost efficient customer delight and ROI. 

Continue Reading

Trending

Copyright © 2018 World Wide Worx