Connect with us

Featured

Take data toll-free

Published

on

Many businesses are adopting a data toll-free approach, where consumers can access a company’s website without having to pay for any data usage, writes ECKART ZOLLNER, Head of Business Development at Jasco Group.

A recent emerging global trend that is disrupting traditional data payment responsibility, is that of businesses offering their consumers free online access to their websites or other online platforms. Usually, consumers who wish to access a business’s online services, particularly via mobile channels, need to have enough data to do so – or they simply don’t go online at all. This has incited many businesses and service providers in South Africa to begin offering free access to their sites regardless of whether the consumer has any data left or not – but who covers the data costs?

The concept of offering toll free access to customer service channels isn’t a new one. Toll-free numbers that enable consumers to call businesses, at no charge to themselves, are still in effect today for both customer care and the selling of services and products. Today’s consumer, however, is more likely to access a business’s services, products or customer care centre via the Internet than over the telephone, meaning that businesses have had to change the way they offer their toll-free services to their market, shifting the same concept to an online platform.

At what price?

Data charges for accessing these “toll-free” platforms are invariably covered by the businesses who own the platforms, or websites. A business wishing to provide their consumers with free access to their sites – data or not – strikes up an agreement with one or many network operators which allows them to cover the charges for anyone who accesses their online site or platform. The charges that the person accessing the site would usually incur simply gets redirected to the business site owner.

Businesses offering this service can end up with hefty data bills, particularly for high traffic sites, however the benefits more than make up for the costs. Although there is the risk of incurring data charges which don’t result in sales, offering free access to their online portals means that businesses are able to effectively remove almost any barrier for consumers – potential and existing – to access their products and services. This translates directly into more site visits which means more sales and, ultimately, increased profits.

The disruptor differentiator

Providing free access to online portals also enables a business to stand out from its competition. It differentiates the business from others of its kind, and consumers are more likely to visit their site, free of charge, than those sites which require that they use their own data. Consumers see the perceived value of this service and are able to immediately feel the tangible effects thereof. They can “window shop” at no cost to themselves, which increases the possibility of impulse buying and serves to heighten the reputation of the business in their eyes. It’s a definite brand activator.

Despite the incurred data charges, businesses offering this service could actually end up saving costs. Businesses could shift most of their operations online and do away with physical, brick-and-mortar premises. This means fewer physical shops or offices, fewer employees and less need for infrastructure, all of which drag heavily at the bottom line.

Finally, businesses are able to tap into heretofore untouched markets. Consumers who would ordinarily have to travel for kilometres can access products and services at their fingertips – for free! Consumers who tend to use up all of their data before their month is up can still access platforms without worrying about the data charges. Suddenly, a business’s customer base can expand radically.

Integration is key

Any business who wishes to offer toll-free access to their sites and online platforms firstly needs a mobile commerce platform which will enable this functionality. Their platform must be able to integrate with their current operational systems, software, billing platforms and even customer relationship management systems.

Integration is critical to this process, to ensure full functionality and service delivery. A business would also need to engage with one or more network providers to ensure the charges for accessing their site, or specific portions of their site, are redirected to themselves and not to their customers.

Paving the way

Toll-free online access is the tip of the iceberg for similar services aimed at making it easier for consumers to access and buy products and services online. There are many other disruptive services starting to emerge in South Africa to simplify the buying process and widen the customer base. For example, companies that offer cardless purchasing, where consumers who don’t have access to credit or debit cards are able to use a ‘middle man’ platform to pay for products and services – consumers “buy” credit from a third-party provider, such as a mobile money service provider, who then pays the supplier for them.

It’s a short hop and a skip to a world of Internet shopping in which consumers are unencumbered by traditional shopper problems such as lack of accessibility or lack of a bank account, and South African businesses are acting quickly to be a part of it.

Featured

Password managers don’t protect you from hackers

Using a password manager to protect yourself online? Research reveals serious weaknesses…

Published

on

Top password manager products have fundamental flaws that expose the data they are designed to protect, rendering them no more secure than saving passwords in a text file, according to a new study by researchers at Independent Security Evaluators (ISE).

“100 percent of the products that ISE analyzed failed to provide the security to safeguard a user’s passwords as advertised,” says ISE CEO Stephen Bono. “Although password managers provide some utility for storing login/passwords and limit password reuse, these applications are a vulnerable target for the mass collection of this data through malicious hacking campaigns.”

In the new report titled “Under the Hood of Secrets Management,” ISE researchers revealed serious weaknesses with top password managers: 1Password, Dashlane, KeePass and LastPass.  ISE examined the underlying functionality of these products on Windows 10 to understand how users’ secrets are stored even when the password manager is locked. More than 60 million individuals 93,000 businesses worldwide rely on password managers. Click here for a copy of the report.

Password managers are marketed as a solution to eliminate the security risks of storing passwords or secrets for applications and browsers in plain text documents. Having previously examined these and other password managers, ISE researchers expected an improved level of security standards preventing malicious credential extraction. Instead ISE found just the opposite. 

Click here to read the findings from the report.

Previous Page1 of 2

Continue Reading

Featured

MWC: Next generation of inflight connectivity to be unveiled

Published

on

Next week at Mobile World Congress, the Seamless Air Alliance will reveal progress on its mission towards enabling the next generation of inflight connectivity. This follows a significant start for the Alliance, which has seen membership increase five-fold since the first meeting in June of last year. The Alliance has a new research laboratory setup and continues progress through its three working groups, writing specifications for the technology, requirements, and operations.

These developments represent a huge leap towards the goal of making connectivity as easy and enjoyable in the skies as it is on the ground. Appearing as part of the Airbus stand (Hall 6, stand 6G34), the Seamless Air Alliance will reveal specification topics that have been completed and published to its membership.

“The passenger experience with inflight connectivity remains one of the great technology challenges. From Day One we have been determined to deliver on our mission to bring industries and technologies together to make the inflight internet experience simple to access and a delight to use,” said the Alliance’s Chief Executive Officer, Jack Mandala.

“I have been tremendously encouraged by the enthusiastic and committed response we have seen and the widening areas of expertise we can call upon as more and more companies and organisations continue to join us,” he added.

Announced during MWC 2018, the Seamless Air Alliance has since grown to twenty-three membercompanies with more than one-hundred key personnel from across the membership participating in its three working groups, with numbers continuing to increase.

The Seamless Air Alliance was created by founding members Airbus, Airtel, Delta Air Lines, OneWeb and Sprint, and quickly joined by Air France KLM, Aeromexico, and GOL Linhas Aereas Inteligentes and global technology leaders including Astronics, Collins Aerospace, Comtech, Cyient, iDirect, Inmarsat, Intelsat, Latecoere, Nokia, and Panasonic. 

Today, the Alliance is pleased to announce five additional new members: Adaptive Channel, Etihad Airways, GlobalReach Technology, Safran, and SITAONAIR.

“We are extremely pleased to have these companies join and be a part of the companies driving the next generation of connectivity.” said Mr Mandala.

The Seamless Air Alliance will enable travelers boarding any flight, on any airline, anywhere in the world, to use their own devices to automatically connect to the Internet with no complicated login process nor paywall to scramble over.

The Alliance is also announcing the release of a new research study on the economic benefit of standardization on the inflight connectivity market at Mobile World Congress. This report is available for download at https://www.seamlessalliance.com/publications/

The Alliance is moving rapidly towards an expected demonstration of the technology later in 2019 and anticipates massive interest in Barcelona from the whole communications eco-system.

Continue Reading

Trending

Copyright © 2018 World Wide Worx