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How to make security count

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Traditionally, businesses have grown to see security as an unnecessary cost. But that needs to change as security is no longer a feature, but instead a necessity. NADER HENEIN outlines how CIOs can build a solid security spend case to present to their CFO.

As my boxing coach used to say, if you want to punch someone in the face you need to make it count and “aim for the back of the head” – follow-through is everything. This may sound like completely useless advice in modern-day information security, but let’s look beyond the concussion into the reasoning behind that bit of wisdom.

As an information security leader today, if you walk into your yearly budget planning meeting armed with statements like “heightened threat levels in cyberspace” and “preventing petabyte DDOS attacks,” you’d be lucky to get enough money to restock the vending machine outside the server room.

Traditionally, businesses have grown to see information security as a cost center – they know it’s needed, but they’re not quite sure why it costs so much. The information security person reports to the CIO, and the CIO reports to the CFO or maybe the CEO, but data security concerns are rarely at the leadership level unless there’s been a breach – at which point you’re the person most likely to be shown the door.

You may need headcount and appliances to achieve your goal, and to get those, you’ve got to “aim for the back of the head” the next time you’re planning your budget, demonstrate how these changes allow the business to achieve its goals.

Security is an enabler – not a feature or a product. It’s far more than just hardware and software that you’re protecting – it’s the wealth of the business and the livelihood of every employee.

This isn’t drama for drama’s sake. You’ve got to communicate those facts to get results.

Making the Case for Information Security Spend

Step 1: Ask, “What is the value of the data being protected?”

There is a fundamental flaw in most businesses: IT and IT security are tasked with protecting the data, while only the business is able to quantify its value. How could you possibly know how much to spend when you don’t know the value of the asset you’re protecting?

The first task is to value your assets – you might think of it in the same way that you would home owners insurance: your premium will be one thing if you have a Star Wars poster on your wall, but it’s a completely different ball game if you’ve got an original Picasso.

Third-party consultancies can help with this task, but if you want to undergo the challenge internally, start with a data audit, spend time with the business understanding the type of records you are storing, and then ask yourself the following questions:

·         If you were to re-acquire this information, how much would it cost?

·         If your competitors gained access to this information, what would be the financial impact on the business?

·         If this information were to be put up for sale on a dark market, what would be the lost value and the subsequent impact to the business?

Remember, you are looking for a defendable dollar value. This will be the cornerstone of your case when making budgetary decisions, and it will also be imperative when you’re allocating resources to protect different data stores (see Step 4). There is no point in protecting anonymized log files from your Exchange e-mail server with the same rigor (read: cost) as customer credit card data – it’s the latter that has the value.

Step 2: Ask, “What’s the cost of a breach if the data’s not properly protected?”

In a previous post entitled “Before the Breach,” I went through what you need to do to be prepared when your data is breached and how preparedness can make the difference between a bad day at work and the last day at work (see DigiNotar).

There’s no mathematical formula for this, but there are ways of getting fairly solid dollar estimates, by looking at the impact of public breaches and their subsequent effects. Ideally, you want to find numbers in your industry. (Geography, on the other hand isn’t very relevant in this case, so don’t worry about looking in the same country or region.)

If you’re a large supermarket chain, then you’re in luck – the impact of the Target breach and its costs, including reputation, regulatory fines and litigation have been made painfully public.

Target Breach snapshot

·         40 million credit and debit cards

·         70 million customer records

·         475 employees let go + 700 unfilled positions removed

·         $162 million ($90m covered by insurance)

·         Profit fell 46%

·         Stock dropped from $66 to $47

·         Regulatory fines (unknown)

·         140 lawsuits (ongoing)

·         CEO resigned

Step 3: Ask, “How much should be invested to protect these data assets?”

The field of cybersecurity economics is fairly new, but there’s a fair bit of research and literature already. My preference is for the Gordon-Loeb model, which shows it’s “generally uneconomical to invest in information security (including cybersecurity related activities)

more than 37% of the expected loss that would occur from a security breach.” This means your upper limit is 37% of the number you calculated in Step 2, and for that you don’t need to argue much with your CFO, since most insurance companies use the same modeling to

assess risk and exposure.

Step 4: Ask, “What’s the best way to get the most from the investment?”

Finally, you need to determine where to start allocating your hard earned cash, because this will also come up in a budgetary meeting.

If you’ve done your homework in Step 2, you’ll know exactly what proportions of your assets you need to allocate and where. If you’ve been very granular with these calculations, you should even be able to put a dollar value on users and user devices (laptops, smartphones,

and so on). This allows you to become hyper-aware of all your assets and risks, while maintaining a level of control proportional to the value of the information at the individual level.

Mastering the “Sweet Science”

There’s a reason they call boxing the “sweet science” — Outside of heavyweights, the “freight train” approach rarely works and can actually end up costing you. You’ve got to be tactical.

Merely defending your digital perimeter and reinforcing only that outer layer is a recipe for disaster. Do your math and build a case based on what security enables the business to achieve, in the same way that a better braking system on a sports car enables engineers to

ultimately make the vehicle go faster.

Have defendable dollar figures to back you up, make a business-driven case and become a business leader – not just another order fulfilment center.

“Change before you have to.” – Jack Welch

The Alternative

Sticking to the status quo where you continue to ask for budgets in the same way reinforces the “cost center” perception. While IT and IT security will not disappear, there will be a gradual shift where the line of business will have increasing control over IT budgets to satisfy their requirements. And since they are a revenue center, those requirements move to the top of the priority list.

The choice is yours – act before that is taken away from you.

And always “aim for the back of the head.”

* Nader Henein, from the Advanced Security Solutions division at BlackBerry.

* Follow Gadget on Twitter on @GadgetZA

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As selfie cameras rise, so must selfie etiquette

Selfies were once a sign of narcissism or self-obsession. Now they are the new normal, writes ARTHUR GOLDSTUCK.

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You can blame Oxford Dictionaries for making the “selfie” respectable. After all, being named Word of the Year, as it was in 2013, does tend to soften some of the self-consciousness in this most self-conscious of actions.

Once seen as a symbol of narcissism and self-obsession, it is now the new normal, to the extent that most smartphones are sold on the basis of the front camera. Or, as that feature is now almost universally named by manufacturers, the “selfie camera”.

I was one of the hold-outs, having a near-allergy to the selfie. I still resist, but succumb more often than I would like. The reason for continued resistance is that it remains a big leap from the word becoming respectable to the action itself shedding its narcissistic image. 

For most, it’s already happened, and for that you can blame Ellen DeGeneres. She  choreographed the most famous group selfie yet at the 2014 Oscars, when she roped a bunch of actors into a group selfie, using the then-new Samsung Galaxy S5 smartphone. Her tweet of the photo became what was then the most retweeted posting ever on Twitter, and was estimated to have been worth a million dollars in marketing value to Samsung.

Ironically, it was Samsung’s up-and-coming challenger, Huawei, that came up with a new word for this type of selfie: the “groufie”. Thanks to an 8 Megapixel front camera on the new Huawei Ascend P7 camera that year which took the highest quality selfies – and groufies – possible on a smartphone at the time.

It didn’t end there, and selfies and groufies have morphed into variations like selfscapes (selfie in a landscape), skyfies (selfies from the air, using remote controlled devices) and jerkies (selfies to make an idiot out of yourself). I invented all of those on the fly, so it’s easy to imagine a new word emerging for every type of selfie.

Continue reading about selfie improvements through the years.

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Mickey’s 90th for SA

Disney Africa announced the local launch of the Mickey the True Original campaign, joining the global festivities honouring 9 decades of Mickey Mouse, his heritage, personality and status as a pop-culture icon.

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As 18 November 2018 marks 90 years since his first appearance in Steamboat Willie in November 1928, a series of world-wide celebrations will be taking place this year and South Africa is no different.

The campaign will come to life with engaging content and events that embrace Mickey’s impact on the past, present and future. The local festivities kick off in earnest this month, leading up to Mickey’s 90th anniversary on 18 November 2018 and beyond:

  • An exclusive local design project where ten highly talented South African artists will apply their own inspiration and artistic interpretation on 6-foot Mickey Mouse statues.
  • Once revealed to the public, the statues will form part of the Mickey the True Original South African Exhibition, inspired by Mickey’s status as a ‘true original’ and his global impact on popular culture. The exhibition will travel to 3 cities and delight fans and families alike as they journey with Mickey over the years. Featuring 4 sections highlighting Mickey’s innovation, his evolution, influence on fashion and also pop culture, the exhibition is in collaboration with Samsung and Edgars, and will visit:

o   Sandton City, Centre Court: 28 September – 14 October

o   Gateway Theatre of Shopping, Expo Explore Court: 19 October – 11 November

o   Canal Walk Shopping Centre. Centre Court: 16 November – 26 November

  • Samsung continues their collaboration with Disney as they honour Mickey’s 90th anniversary nationally at all Samsung and Edgars Stores. Entitled Unlocking the Imagination, fans are encouraged to visit these stores, take a selfie with a giant Mickey plush toy using their Samsung Galaxy Note9 and stand a chance to win not only a giant Mickey plush, but also an international family trip. Visit www.Samsung.com for more information
  • Mickey’s 90th Spectacular, a two-hour prime-time special, will be screened on M-Net 101 later this year. The elegant affair will feature star-studded musical performances, moving tributes and never-before-seen short films. Superstars from music, film and television will join the birthday fun for the internationally beloved character.
  • In addition, look out for special programming on Mickey’s birthday (18 November) across Disney Channel (DStv, Channel 303), Disney XD (DStv, Channel 304) and Disney Junior (DStv, Channel 309).
  • In retailers, Edgars will be stocking a complete collection of trendy fashion, accessories and footwear for the whole family, inspired entirely by Mickey Mouse.
  • Mickey will be the central theme of an in-store campaign nationwide this November and December, with brand new products, apparel, toys, as well as titles from Disney Publishing Worldwide, including books, arts & crafts and comics
  • Discovery Vitality and Disney are celebrating healthy, happy families this festive season by offering helpful and exciting tips and tricks on how to eat nutritious, yet delicious, foods, all inspired by Mickey. There’s also a trip to Disneyland Paris up for grabs. Log on to www.discovery.co.za/vitality for information.
  • And much more – check the press for updates

“Binding generations together more than any other animated character, Mickey Mouse is the “True Original” who reminds people of all ages of the benefits of laughter, optimism and hope,” says Christine Service, Senior Vice President and Country Manager of The Walt Disney Company Africa. “With his universal appeal and ability to emotionally connect with generations all over the world, no other character quite occupies a similar space in the hearts and minds of a global fan base and we are thrilled to be sharing these local festivities.”

Mickey’s birthday is celebrated in honour of the release of his first theatrical film, Steamboat Willie, on 18th November 1928, at the Colony Theatre in New York City. Since then, he has starred in more than 100 cartoons and can currently be seen on Disney Channel (DStv, Channel 303) in the Mickey Mouse cartoon series and on Disney Junior (DStv, Channel 309) in Mickey and the Roadster Racers.

South African fans are encouraged to share their Mickey Mouse moments on social media using the hashtag#Mickey90Africa.

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