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New Wi-Fi software separates data traffic from control traffic

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Ruckus Wireless has developed the Virtual SmartZone Data Plane, a virtual data plane for Wi-Fi that separates data traffic from control traffic on large wireless networks.

Carriers and enterprises will now have maximum flexibility in network deployments, installing multiple data flow managers across a distributed network to help optimise cost and performance based on user demands.

The new software – called Virtual SmartZone Data Plane (vSZ-D) – works with Ruckus’ Virtual SmartZone controllers, which provide a software-based system for managing wireless networks. Virtual SmartZone has built strong market momentum in just one year, with more than 700 customers in production networks – managing more than 200,000 access points. Virtual SmartZone is an early highlight in the industry’s network functions virtualization (NFV) movement, which encapsulates key network functions in software that can run on industry-standard hardware.

“Ruckus is once again leading the way in Wi-Fi innovation, making it easier for carriers and enterprises to virtualise and optimise their networks,” said Greg Beach, vice president of product management at Ruckus. “Separating control and data traffic delivers significant flexibility, cost and performance advantages for networks that support thousands of devices and access points.”

Virtual SmartZone Data Plane provides a flexible, cost-effective approach to aggregate and tunnel end-user data for specific application or security policy needs. Tunneling traditionally drives up cost and lowers performance, requiring expensive physical controllers to be replicated at each site – while increasing hardware and labour costs as the network grows. By contrast, vSZ-D distributes the workload across multiple, inexpensive systems – requiring only a single controller instance along with inexpensive vSZ-D deployments at remote sites. Data also moves faster because it can bypass the controller with only incremental impact on each site.

Functionally, the vSZ-D is manageable by the Virtual SmartZone controller, while enabling independent scaling of control and data planes. Multiple vSZ-D instances can be deployed at distributed sites – or an instance can be deployed centrally, helping to afford maximum network design flexibility. The NFV-based design eliminates deployment limitations due to physical computer hardware and geographic location. Virtual SmartZone controllers feature a tremendous level of flexibility: scaling up to 300,000 devices, offering single and multi-tenancy, and enabling “WiFi-as-you-grow” for networks to expand and adapt to the changing needs of their business. The SmartZone software platform supports all of Ruckus’ ZoneFlex indoor and outdoor wireless access points.

Key vSZ-D product features include:

·         Encrypted data tunneling: Provides flexible options for data tunneling from all types of Virtual LANs (VLANs), including guest traffic encryption; point of sale data tunneling for PCI compliance; VoIP traffic tunneling; and seamless roaming across Layer 2 subnets.

·         Dynamic data plane scaling: Provides scale and resiliency for large deployments supporting 1Gbps, 10Gbps or higher throughput – which can be dynamically tuned without needing software updates.

·         Cluster architecture: Provides scale and resiliency for large deployments supporting up to 30,000 access points and 300,000 devices. One Virtual SmartZone controller can manage up to two vSZ-D instances, and four-controller cluster can manage up to 8 vSZ-D instances.

·         Support for multiple hypervisors: Provides initial support for two of the industry’s most widely deployed virtualisation engines – VMware vSphere and KVM (OpenStack).

vSZ-D is immediately available as an extension to Ruckus’ existing Virtual SmartZone controllers – offered in a “high scale” version (vSZ-H) for carriers and large enterprises, and an “essentials” version (vSZ-E) for large and mid-size enterprises. Virtual SmartZone software extends the Smart Wi-Fi technology that has made Ruckus so popular, including proprietary breakthroughs such as BeamFlex+ adaptive antenna technology, ChannelFly predictive channel selection, SmartMesh self-optimised network meshing and Dynamic PSK Wi-Fi security – all of which help Ruckus deliver reliable, secure and scalable high-performance Wi-Fi for enterprise and service providers.

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VoD cuts the cord in SA

Some 20% of South Africans who sign up for a subscription video on demand (SVOD) service such as Netflix or Showmax do so with the intention of cancelling their pay television subscription.

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That’s according to GfK’s international ViewScape survey*, which this year covers Africa (South Africa, Kenya and Nigeria) for the first time.

The study—which surveyed 1,250 people representative of urban South African adults with Internet access—shows that 90% of the country’s online adults today use at least one online video service and that just over half are paying to view digital online content. The average user spends around 7 hours and two minutes a day consuming video content, with broadcast television accounting for just 42% of the time South Africans spend in front of a screen.

Consumers in South Africa spend nearly as much of their daily viewing time – 39% of the total – watching free digital video sources such as YouTube and Facebook as they do on linear television. People aged 18 to 24 years spend more than eight hours a day watching video content as they tend to spend more time with free digital video than people above their age.

Says Benjamin Ballensiefen, managing director for Sub Sahara Africa at GfK: “The media industry is experiencing a revolution as digital platforms transform viewers’ video consumption behaviour. The GfK ViewScape study is one of the first to not only examine broadcast television consumption in Kenya, Nigeria and South Africa, but also to quantify how linear and online forms of content distribution fit together in the dynamic world of video consumption.”

The study finds that just over a third of South African adults are using streaming video on demand (SVOD) services, with only 16% of SVOD users subscribing to multiple services. Around 23% use per-pay-view platforms such as DSTV Box Office, while about 10% download pirated content from the Internet. Around 82% still sometimes watch content on disc-based media.

“Linear and non-linear television both play significant roles in South Africa’s video landscape, though disruption from digital players poses a growing threat to the incumbents,” says Molemo Moahloli, general manager for media research & regional business development at GfK Sub Sahara Africa. “Among most demographics, usage of paid online content is incremental to consumption of linear television, but there are signs that younger consumers are beginning to substitute SVOD for pay-television subscriptions.”

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New data rules raise business trust challenges

When the General Data Protection Regulation comes into effect on May 25th, financial services firms will face a new potential threat to their on-going challenges with building strong customer relationships, writes DARREL ORSMOND, Financial Services Industry Head at SAP Africa.

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The regulation – dubbed GDPR for short – is aimed at giving European citizens control back over their personal data. Any firm that creates, stores, manages or transfers personal information of an EU citizen can be held liable under the new regulation. Non-compliance is not an option: the fines are steep, with a maximum penalty of €20-million – or nearly R300-million – for transgressors.

GDPR marks a step toward improved individual rights over large corporates and states that prevents the latter from using and abusing personal information at their discretion. Considering the prevailing trust deficit – one global EY survey found that 60% of global consumers worry about hacking of bank accounts or bank cards, and 58% worry about the amount of personal and private data organisations have about them – the new regulation comes at an opportune time. But it is almost certain to cause disruption to normal business practices when implemented, and therein lies both a threat and an opportunity.

The fundamentals of trust

GDPR is set to tamper with two fundamental factors that can have a detrimental effect on the implicit trust between financial services providers and their customers: firstly, customers will suddenly be challenged to validate that what they thought companies were already doing – storing and managing their personal data in a manner that is respectful of their privacy – is actually happening. Secondly, the outbreak of stories relating to companies mistreating customer data or exposing customers due to security breaches will increase the chances that customers now seek tangible reassurance from their providers that their data is stored correctly.

The recent news of Facebook’s indiscriminate sharing of 50 million of its members’ personal data to an outside firm has not only led to public outcry but could cost the company $2-trillion in fines should the Federal Trade Commission choose to pursue the matter to its fullest extent. The matter of trust also extends beyond personal data: in EY’s 2016 Global Consumer Banking Survey, less than a third of respondents had complete trust that their banks were being transparent about fees and charges.

This is forcing companies to reconsider their role in building and maintaining trust with its customers. In any customer relationship, much is done based on implicit trust. A personal banking customer will enjoy a measure of familiarity that often provides them with some latitude – for example when applying for access to a new service or an overdraft facility – that can save them a lot of time and energy. Under GDPR and South Africa’s POPI act, this process is drastically complicated: banks may now be obliged to obtain permission to share customer data between different business units (for example because they are part of different legal entities and have not expressly received permission). A customer may now allow banks to use their personal data in risk scoring models, but prevent them from determining whether they qualify for private banking services.

What used to happen naturally within standard banking processes may be suddenly constrained by regulation, directly affecting the bank’s relationship with its customers, as well as its ability to upsell to existing customers.

The risk of compliance

Are we moving to an overly bureaucratic world where even the simplest action is subject to a string of onerous processes? Compliance officers are already embedded within every function in a typical financial services institution, as well as at management level. Often the reporting of risk processes sits outside formal line functions and end up going straight to the board. This can have a stifling effect on innovation, with potentially negative consequences for customer service.

A typical banking environment is already creaking under the weight of close to 100 acts, which makes it difficult to take the calculated risks needed to develop and launch innovative new banking products. Entire new industries could now emerge, focusing purely on the matter of compliance and associated litigation. GDPR already requires the services of Data Protection Officers, but the growing complexity of regulatory compliance could add a swathe of new job functions and disciplines. None of this points to the type of innovation that the modern titans of business are renowned for.

A three-step plan of action

So how must banks and other financial services firms respond? I would argue there are three main elements to successfully navigating the immediate impact of the new regulations:

Firstly, ensuring that the technologies you use to secure, manage and store personal data is sufficiently robust. Modern financial services providers have a wealth of customer data at their disposal, including unstructured data from non-traditional sources such as social media. The tools they use to process and safeguard this data needs to be able to withstand the threats posed by potential data breaches and malicious attacks.

Secondly, rethinking the core organisational processes governing their interactions with customers. This includes the internal measures for setting terms and conditions, how customers are informed of their intention to use their data, and how risk is assessed. A customer applying for medical insurance will disclose deeply personal information about themselves to the insurance provider: it is imperative the insurer provides reassurance that the customer’s data will be treated respectfully and with discretion and with their express permission.

Thirdly, financial services firms need to define a core set of principles for how they treat customers and what constitutes fair treatment. This should be an extension of a broader organisational focus on treating customers fairly, and can go some way to repairing the trust deficit between the financial services industry and the customers they serve.

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