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Knott-Craig launches low-cost wireless Internet service provider

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Alan Knott-Craig Jr has announced the launch of HeroTel, a new Wireless Internet provider (WISP).

HeroTel will provide wireless broadband at affordable rates to households and small businesses.

Over the last 13 years the lack of reliable fixed line options has birthed a thriving industry of over 200 wireless Internet service providers (WISPs) with estimated combined annual revenues of R700million.

Wireless broadband connections continue to grow at twice the rate of fixed lines, highlighting a fast-growing market segment within an already booming industry.

HeroTel plans to consolidate the WISP industry in order to provide a single national wireless broadband provider.

“South Africans need fast, reliable and affordable broadband and are increasingly looking for an alternative to ADSL,” said Knott-Craig. “WISPs already satsify this craving with net profit margins reaching as high as 40%. However, due to the fragmented nature of the industry the WISPs suffer from lack of coordination. HeroTel plans to consolidate the disparate regional wireless broadband providers under a national brand and unlocked the economies of scale.”

According to Knott-Craig, HeroTel will differ from a traditional data network provider, which employs the age-old methodology for network roll-out: high capex, centralised control, proprietary technology.

“The old ways only make sense when the operator can generate revenue from high-margin voice calls. Pure-play data networks do not have the luxury of selling minutes, which is why today’s data networks continue to struggle to provide a suitable return on capital for investors.

“The truth is that consumers want faster speeds and lower prices every year. Instead of fighting that demand, WISPs have figured out a way to deliver the goods whilst making a profit. HeroTel has taken the lessons learnt by WISPs to reduce the cost of deploying and operating a telecoms network to a point where it is profitable to provide fast, reliable, affordable broadband to the public.”

HeroTel was formed following the acquisition of Snowball, based in Stellenbosch, and Cloud Connect, based in George, and is funded by an investor consortium including former First National Bank, CEO Michael Jordaan, former Rand Merchant Bank, CEO Mike Pfaff and CIO (Chief Investment Officer) Derek Prout-Jones.

“We are currently integrating our WISPs under a unified network and brand and are scheduled to officially launch HeroTel for consumers on 1 April 2016.”

Knott-Craig will take on the role of Executive Chairman, supported by CEO Corne de Villiers, COO Francois Wessels, CIO (Chief Information Officer) Imel Rautenbach, and CFO Van Zyl Botha. Alan remains CEO of Project Isizwe, a non-profit company which he founded in 2013 that provides free WiFi to poor communities.

Prof John Volmink, chairman of the board of Isizwe confirmed that the board has approved Knott-Craig taking on the role of Chairman of HeroTel and is excited for the benefits that will accrue to Isizwe thanks to a strong commercial partner.

“HeroTel is not about building a telco from scratch. It’s about consolidating an existing network of hundreds of wireless broadband entrepreneurs and aligning them with a greater mission: Making it easy to get fast, reliable, affordable broadband.” says Knott-Craig.

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Samsung unfolds the future

At the #Unpacked launch, Samsung delivered the world’s first foldable phone from a major brand. ARTHUR GOLDSTUCK tried it out.

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Everything that could be known about the new Samsung Galaxy S10 range, launched on Wednesday in San Francisco, seems to have been known before the event.

Most predictions were spot-on, including those in Gadget (see our preview here), thanks to a series of leaks so large, they competed with the hole an iceberg made in the Titanic.

The big surprise was that there was a big surprise. While it was widely expected that Samsung would announce a foldable phone, few predicted what would emerge from that announcement. About the only thing that was guessed right was the name: Galaxy Fold.

The real surprise was the versatility of the foldable phone, and the fact that units were available at the launch. During the Johannesburg event, at which the San Francisco launch was streamed live, small groups of media took turns to enter a private Fold viewing area where photos were banned, personal phones had to be handed in, and the Fold could be tried out under close supervision.

The first impression is of a compact smartphone with a relatively small screen on the front – it measures 4.6-inches – and a second layer of phone at the back. With a click of a button, the phone folds out to reveal a 7.3-inch inside screen – the equivalent of a mini tablet.

The fold itself is based on a sophisticated hinge design that probably took more engineering than the foldable display. The result is a large screen with no visible seam.

The device introduces the concept of “app continuity”, which means an app can be opened on the front and, in mid-use, if the handset is folded open, continue on the inside from where the user left off on the front. The difference is that the app will the have far more space for viewing or other activity.

Click here to read about the app experience on the inside of the Fold.

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Password managers don’t protect you from hackers

Using a password manager to protect yourself online? Research reveals serious weaknesses…

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Top password manager products have fundamental flaws that expose the data they are designed to protect, rendering them no more secure than saving passwords in a text file, according to a new study by researchers at Independent Security Evaluators (ISE).

“100 percent of the products that ISE analyzed failed to provide the security to safeguard a user’s passwords as advertised,” says ISE CEO Stephen Bono. “Although password managers provide some utility for storing login/passwords and limit password reuse, these applications are a vulnerable target for the mass collection of this data through malicious hacking campaigns.”

In the new report titled “Under the Hood of Secrets Management,” ISE researchers revealed serious weaknesses with top password managers: 1Password, Dashlane, KeePass and LastPass.  ISE examined the underlying functionality of these products on Windows 10 to understand how users’ secrets are stored even when the password manager is locked. More than 60 million individuals 93,000 businesses worldwide rely on password managers. Click here for a copy of the report.

Password managers are marketed as a solution to eliminate the security risks of storing passwords or secrets for applications and browsers in plain text documents. Having previously examined these and other password managers, ISE researchers expected an improved level of security standards preventing malicious credential extraction. Instead ISE found just the opposite. 

Click here to read the findings from the report.

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