Connect with us

Featured

How your IP-camera security gets obsolete – fast!

Published

on

Maintaining an up-to-date IP camera surveillance system requires more than just a passing glance at the monitors. There are significant drawbacks to keeping equipment for too long. Not only is it dated, but there is a chasm between features available on older models, compared to what is available today.

Marc van Jaarsveldt, consultant, The Surveillance Factory, a system integrator, says there are many factors to consider when reviewing your security cameras to determine if an upgrade is required: “There are many factors to consider prior to upgrading and the option to extend the lifespan of your existing equipment must be appraised. The biggest challenge is to decide whether to keep abreast of new technology or to try and keep your system live for as long as possible. This trade-off does have implications for how effective your camera system is as a security tool.”

While getting value out of your initial investment is key, there is no denying the leap that surveillance technology has made in the past five years and what this means in terms of camera technology features and benefits if you do decide to upgrade your system.

When reviewing the system, van Jaarsveldt says that the camera lifespan will generally be impacted by the quality of the equipment purchased at the outset, the current operating environment and maintenance schedule as well as the client’s overall appetite for improvements made to the system.

In a typical surveillance scenario, a quality camera may have a lifespan of between five and ten years, while a less expensive model may only survive for three years. “This will be impacted by the environment as an outdoor camera, for example, will be exposed to harsher elements. There are temperature changes, rain, dust, moving parts (on PTZ cameras) and even electrical surges to contend with, all of which can affect the camera” says van Jaarsveldt.

He cautions that camera lifespans do vary based on the manufacturer. Not all camera brands can survive in the field for ten-years: “The average warranty period for a camera is three years, with a possible extension to five years. Being out of warranty, however, does not mean it doesn’t work, it will simply cost more to repair, should something go wrong.”

If longevity is a goal, then maintenance of the system is critical. Van Jaarsveldt says that while this does not impact the overall lifespan significantly, it can make a difference to its functionality: “Simply cleaning the cameras will help, especially if they are in a harsh environment where they are exposed to sun, dust, water or chemicals from industrial processes. By cleaning the camera housings and lenses you are able to slow down the rate at which the hardware degrades or deteriorates. This can prolong the life of a camera. Also check for and remove nesting insects such as wasps, ants and spiders from camera housings.”

While it is understandable that users want to get the most value out of the system and enjoy a longer lifespan, the biggest influence and challenge to maintaining an up-to-date system is the rapid rate of technology development. While cameras five years ago offered an acceptable 720p resolution (1MP), today’s cameras routinely offer 3MP, 5MP resolutions and even the much talked about 4k, which is 8MP.

“The fact is that cameras five years ago are in no way a comparison to what is currently available. Even the best IP camera then could not compare with what is available now,” says van Jaarsveldt. “This makes the challenge more complicated as newer technology offers so much more value for a security environment where the quality of video footage is so important.”

He says that for some industries, such as retail, this lag in technology poses a significant risk and threat to the business: “There are certain sectors that simply can’t afford to fall behind the technology curve. While the older systems may still work, the reality is that a new system will offer more functionality and significantly more value to the business.”

An example according to van Jaarsveldt is the fact that older generation cameras offer lower quality images due to much lower resolutions and substantially less advanced light management such as WDR: “Earlier generations of cameras don’t offer good resolution with excellent light management, exposure and contrast control and wide dynamic range (WDR). While the new generation IP cameras offer far superior resolutions and most end users tend to accept 2MP or even 3MP as the entry level resolution.”

These higher resolutions offer more detailed images and when the video is analysed for incidents or events, this additional resolution is critically important. Newer IP cameras also offer superior light management, automatically allowing for big variances in contrast to be eliminated by combining multiple images.

“In security environments, where light contrast affects the cameras significantly, this is a very important feature. The camera is now able to produce video footage of a far higher quality and this provides improved security and forensic value,” explains van Jaarsveldt.

He says that while older systems may still be useful, clients need to be aware of the ramifications of keeping the older hardware in the field for too long: “If a complete camera swap out is not affordable, then review your cameras and replace the ones that are used in higher risk areas with newer models. Note that cameras with vastly higher resolutions may affect the performance of the back end recording server or NVR as well.”

By working with reputable system integrators, clients should be made aware of the specific components of their camera system that need to be retired and replaced. “Surveillance systems are generally in place for a good reason, it is imperative that they are upgraded as necessary and maintained appropriately,” says van Jaarsveldt.

Featured

Epic Games brings a
Nite-mare to Android

Epic Games’ decision to not publish games through Google Play inadvertently opens a market to Android virus makers, writes BRYAN TURNER.

Published

on

Epic Games, the creator of Fortnite, decided to take the high road by skipping Google Play’s app distribution market and placing a third-party installer for its games on its website. While this is technically fine, it is not recommended for the average user, because allowing third-party installers on one’s smartphone opens up the possibility of non-signed and malicious software to be run on the smartphone. 

In June, malware researchers at ESET warned Android gamers that malicious fake versions of the Fortnite app had been created to steal personal information or damage smartphones. A malware researcher demonstrated how the fake applications works in the Tweet below.

While the decision to bypass Google Play was a bold move on Epic Games’ part, it has been a long time coming for app developers to move their premium apps off Google’s Play Store. The two major app distributors, Google Play and Apple’s App Store, take a 30% cut of every purchase made through their app distribution platforms. 

The App Store is currently the only way to get apps on a non-modified iOS device, which is why Epic Games had no choice for Fortnite to be in the App Store. On the other hand, Android phones can install packages downloaded through the browser, which makes the Play Store almost unnecessary for the gaming company. 

The most interesting part of this development is that Google is not the “bad guy” and Epic Games is no saviour to other game developers. Epic Games is a company with a multi-billion dollar valuation and has resources like large-scale servers to distribute and update its games, a big marketing budget to ensure everyone knows how to get its games, and server security to protect against malware. 

Resources of this scale allow the game company to turn a cold shoulder to Google’s Play Store distribution and focus on its own, in-house solution. 

That said, installing packages without the Google Play Store must be done carefully, and it is essential to do homework on where a package is downloaded. Moreover, when a package is installed outside of the Google Play Store, a security switch to block the installation of third party apps must be turned off. This switch should be turned back on immediately after the third party package is installed. 

This complex amount of steps makes it less worthwhile to install third party apps, in favour of rather waiting for them to reach the Play Store.

From a consumer perspective, ESET recommends not installing packages outside of the Google Play Store and to ignore advertisements to download the game from other sources.

Continue Reading

Featured

How to take on IoT

The Internet of Things (IoT) is coming, whether you like it or not and organisations today will look to platforms and services that help them manage and analyse the streams of data coming from connected devices, says RONALD RAVEL, Director B2B South Africa, Toshiba South Africa.

Published

on

Today, we are witnessing an explosion in IoT deployments and solutions and are moving towards a world where almost everything you can imagine will be connected. While this opens the door to many possibilities it also comes with its own challenges such as privacy and security.

The Internet has become an integral part of everyday life; it has been a free for all on a daily basis. IoT is a difficult concept for many people to wrap their minds around. Essentially, nearly every business will be affected.

Managing vast quantities of data across increasingly mobile workforces can be tremendously beneficial if done well, but equally can be cumbersome and ineffective if not managed properly. This is why technologies such as mobile edge computing are becoming increasingly popular, helping to increase the prevalence of secure mobile working and data management in the age of IoT.

Unlocking IoT

The evolution of IoT, despite rapid and ongoing technological innovation, is still very much in its fledgling stages. Its potential, though, is demonstrated by the fact that by 2020, Bain anticipates a significant shift in uptake, with roughly 80 per cent of adoptions at that point to have progressed to the stage of either ‘proof of concept’ or extensive implementation. This means that technological innovation in IoT for the enterprise is progressing at a similarly fast rate with many of these solutions being developed with utilities, engineering, manufacturing and logistics companies in mind.

Processing at the edge

For IoT to be adopted at the rate predicted, technology which does not overwhelm current or even legacy systems must be implemented. Mobile edge computing solves this. Such solutions offer processing power at the edge of the network, helping firms with a high proportion of mobile workers to reduce operational strain and latency by processing the most critical data at the edge and close to its originating source. Relevant data can then be sent to the cloud for observation and analysis, thereby reducing the waves of ‘data garbage’ which has to be processed by cloud services.

A logistics manager can feasibly monitor and analyse the efficiency of warehouse operations, for example, with important data calculations carried out in real-time, on location, and key data findings then sent to the cloud for centrally-located data scientists to analyse.

The work of wearables

The potential of IoT means it not only has the scope to change the way people work, but also where they work. While widespread mobile working is a relatively new trend in industries such as banking and professional services, for CIOs in sectors where working on the move is inherent – such as logistics and field maintenance – mobility is high on the agenda.

Wearables – and specifically smart glasses – have started to gain traction within the business world. With mobile edge computing solutions acting as the gateway, smart glasses such as Toshiba’s assisted reality AR 100 viewer solution have been designed to benefit frontline and field-based workers in industries such as utilities, manufacturing and logistics. In the renewable energy sector, for example, a wind turbine engineer conducting repairs may use assisted reality smart glasses to call up the schematics of the turbine to enable a hands-free view of service procedures. This means that when a fault becomes a barrier to repair, the engineer is able to use collaboration software to call for assistance from a remote expert and have additional information sent through, thereby saving time and money by eradicating the need for extra personnel to be sent to the site.

The time is ripe for organisations to look to exploit the age of IoT to improve the productivity and safety of their workers, as well as the end service delivered to customers. In fact, Toshiba’s recent ‘Maximising Mobility’ report found that 49 per cent of organisations believe their sector can benefit from the hands-free functionality of smart glasses, while 47 per cent expect them to deliver improved mobile working and 41 per cent foresee better collaboration and information sharing. Embracing IoT technologies such as mobile edge computing and wearable solutions will be an essential step for many organisations within these verticals as they look to stay on top of 21st century working challenges.

Continue Reading

Trending

Copyright © 2018 World Wide Worx