Connect with us

Featured

How IoT will change insurance

Published

on

The IoT is seen as futuristic in the insurance sector, with many insurers hanging back, but they are not unaware of its potential to grow the insurance industry, writes ECKART ZOLLNER, Head of Business Development at the Jasco Group.

We are in the midst of a digital revolution that is fundamentally changing the way we do business, the way businesses operate, and how they interact with both customers and competitors. The world is gradually moving online in its entirety, one device – one thing – at a time. And so, the Internet of Things (IoT) is here, making waves in both the private and business sectors across the globe. The Insurance industry is not exempt from the impact of IoT and, in fact, is poised for complete disruption in the way it traditionally interacts with customers.

While it’s true that IoT is still perceived as futuristic in the insurance sector, with many insurers hanging back on full adoption until they are assured that the benefits outweigh the risks, they are not unaware of its potential to grow the insurance industry and launch it into the Digital Age.

Leveraging IoT for the insurance industry

IoT offers insurers the opportunity to leverage data from ‘Smart’, connected devices such as residential and automotive sensors; wearable technology; drones; GPS, mobile and telematics devices; ‘Smart’ appliances and more.  This enables them to develop new business, improve risk assessment and proactively engage with customers on how to minimise risk for both themselves and the insurer.

High value assets can be effectively monitored through the constant relay of tracking and usage data, and dangerous conditions can more easily be identified, enabling insurers to react accordingly, potentially avoiding dangerous situations and the associated losses and damage caused to property or people.

The data collected from IoT devices, when properly collected, collated and analysed, can aid an insurer by offering predictability, helping to identify current and future trends which the insurer can then act on. Analysis of usage data will be able to pinpoint customer trends and patterns in their lifestyles, buying habits and risk portfolios.

Data accumulation over time allows for stored data to be analysed for patterns or trends for both predictive and comparative use, ensuring that insurers are on the right path and that mistakes are not repeated.

It can also assist insurers to conform and comply with legislation. The customer’s right to privacy, for ‘opt in’ and permission based policy execution, and for consent of data supervision or surveillance, has never been more important than now, with the Protection of Personal Information (PoPI) Act looming. Insurers will need to take care to moderate and control how they collect, use and disseminate data, and data storage and collection will be under the microscope.

Putting IoT to use

For insurers who are traditionally imbued with red-tape, bureaucracy and archaic siloed systems, digitalising and implementing an IoT strategy can prove a challenge. In order to be effective, IOT has to be operationalised through integration with existing business systems and workflow processes. These themselves may need adaptation to suit the introduction of digital technology and new data sources, as well as control mechanisms.

A step-by-step approach is recommended, starting with things like cloud adoption wherever it makes the most sense, and moving towards the goal of full IoT adoption.

Due to the multi-access nature of our environment today, customers expect to access service providers, like their insurer, from virtually anywhere across the platform of their choice. In order for insurers to maintain control of an omni-channel offering, they will need to integrate multiple channels through a single management platform, which will then be able to administer access rights and usage policies as required.

Monetizing IoT for insurers will ultimately come from the provision of greater efficiencies, greater data accuracy, better loss avoidance (predictability), improved compliance enforcement, and the influencing of customer behaviour. These, collectively, will serve to boost the capital growth of the insurance sector, and enhance profit margins significantly.

Navigating the challenges

Data security will be the prevailing challenge faced by insurers – in fact, any organisation or sector – looking to leverage IoT. Careful consideration of the digital strategy will need to be undertaken, prioritising end-to-end security in the overall system design. This will include data collection devices, aggregation gateways, operational platforms, back end business intelligence, and artificial intelligence/machine learning systems.

Where social networks and digital platforms are leveraged, it will be vital to establish the reliability of the data, its source and its compatibility with local compliance regulations. This data will likely only serve for indicative purposes, as it is not likely to comply across the board with legislation such as PoPI.

Embracing change

IoT will undoubtedly revolutionise the way that insurance is offered, brought to market, considered and chosen, and insurers should start looking at the steps they need to take to implement IoT now. The benefits are set to propel the insurance sector away from its perception as a grudge purchase, making it a value-added service that people will want to invest in. It will require, however, that insurers shake the chains of tradition and embrace the Digital Age.

Featured

Gadget goes to Hollywood

Gadget visited the Netflix studios last week. In the first of a series, ARTHUR GOLDSTUCK talks to CEO Reed Hastings.

Published

on

Netflix CEO Reed Hastings is no stranger to Africa. He has travelled throughout South Africa, taught maths in Swaziland for two years with the Peace Corps, and visits close family in Maputo. As a result, he is keenly aware of the South African entertainment and connectivity landscape.

In an exclusive interview at the Netflix studios in Hollywood, Los Angeles, last week, he revealed that Netflix had no intentions of challenging MultiChoice’s dominance of live sports broadcasting on the continent.

“Other firms will do sport and news; we are trying to focus on movies and TV shows,” he said. “There are a lot of areas that are video that we are not doing: sports, news, video gaming, user-generated content. We don’t have live sport.

Reed Hastings at the Netflix studios in Hollywood last week. Pic: ADAM ROSE

“We’re not replacing MultiChoice at all. Their subscriber growth is steady in South Africa. They serve a need that’s independent of the Internet, via low-price satellite. There is no intention of capturing that audience. If they’re growing, it’s because they serve a need.”

While Reed ruled out any collaboration with MultiChoice on its satellite delivery platform, despite its collaboration with another pay-TV service, Sky TV in the United Kingdom, he did not close the door. He stressed that Netflix saw itself as an Internet-based service, and would pursue the opportunities offered by evolving broadband in Africa.

“If you look in other markets like the USA, how Comcast carries us on set-top boxes with their other services, it could happen with MultiChoice, the same as with all the pay-TV providers.

“We’re really focused on being a service over the Internet and not over satellite. Our service doesn’t work on satellite. Where we work with Sky is on Internet-connected devices. We’re happy to work on Internet-connected devices. We tend to work on smart TVs, but need broadband Internet for that.

“Broadband is getting faster in Nigeria, Tanzania, Kenya and South Africa – we can see the positive trendlines – so it’s more likely we will work with broadband Internet companies.”

Hastings is a firm believer in the idea that one content provider’s success does not depend on pushing another down.

“HBO has grown at the same time as we have, so can see our success doesn’t determine their success. What matters is amazing content with which the world falls in love.”

Click here to read about Netflix’s international expansion, and how the streaming service selects content for its platform.

Previous Page1 of 2

Continue Reading

Featured

Take these 5 steps to digital

Published

on

By MARK WALKER, Associate Vice President for Sub-Saharan Africa at IDC Middle East, Africa and Turkey.

Digital transformation isn’t a buzz word because it sounds nice and looks good on the business CV. It is fundamental to long-term business success. IDC anticipates that 75% of enterprises will be on the path to digital transformation by 2027. 

However, digital transformation is not a process that ticks a box and moves to the next item on the agenda – it is defined by the organisation’s shift towards a digitally empowered infrastructure and employee. It is an evolution across system, infrastructure, process, individual and leadership and should follow clear pathways to ensure sustainable success.

The nature of the enterprise has changed completely with the influence of digital, cloud and the Fourth Industrial Revolution (4IR), and success is reliant on strategic change.

There is a lot more ownership and transparency throughout the organisation and there is a responsibility that comes with that – employees want access to information, there has to be speed in knowledge, transactions and engagement,” he adds. “To ensure that the organisation evolves alongside digital and demand, it has to follow five very clear pathways to long-term, achievable success.

The first of these is to evaluate where the enterprise sits right now in terms of its digital journey. This will differ by organisation size and industry, as well as its reliance on technology. A smaller organisation that only needs a basic accounting function or the internet for email will have far different considerations to a small organisation that requires high-end technology to manage hedge funds or drive cloud solutions. The same comparisons apply to the enterprise-level organisation. The mining sector will have a completely different sub-set of technology requirements and infrastructure limitations to the retail or finance sectors.

Ultimately, every organisation, regardless of size or industry, is reliant on technology to grow or deliver customer service, but their digital transformation requirements are different. To ensure that investment into artificial intelligence (AI), machine learning, knowledge engines, automation and connectivity are accurately placed within the business and know exactly where the business is going.

The second step is to examine what the business wants to achieve. Again, the goals of the organisation over the long and short term will be entirely sector dependent, but it is essential that it examine what the competitive environment looks like and what influences customer expectations. This understanding will allow for the business to hone its digital requirements accordingly.

The third step is to match expectations to reality. You need to see how you can move your digital transformation strategy forward and what areas require prioritisation, what funding models will support your digital aspirations, and how this tie into what the market wants. Ultimately, every step of the process has to be prioritised to ensure it maps back to where you are and the strategic steps that will take you to where you want to go.

The fourth step is to look at the operational side of the process. This is as critical as any other aspect of the transformation strategy as it maps budget to skills to infrastructure in such a way as to ensure that any project delivers return on investment. Budget and funding are always top of mind when it comes to digital transformation – these are understandably key issues for the business. How will it benefit from the investment? How will it influence the customer experience? What impact will this have on the ongoing bottom line? These questions tie neatly into the fifth step in the process – the feedback loop.

This is often the forgotten step, but it is the most important. The feedback loop is critical to ensuring that the digital transformation process is achieving the right results, that the right metrics are in place, and that the needle is moving in the right direction. It is within this feedback loop that the organisation can consistently refine the process to ensure that it moves to each successive step with the right metrics in place.

There is also one final element that every organisation should have in place throughout its digital evolution. An element that many overlook – engagement. There must be a real desire to change, from the top of the organisation right down to the bottom, and an understanding of what it means to undertake this change and why it is essential. This is why this will be a key discussion at the 2019 IDC South Africa CIO Summit taking place in April this year. With this in place, the five steps to digital transformation will make sense and deliver the right results.

Continue Reading

Trending

Copyright © 2018 World Wide Worx