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How IoT is changing health

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The healthcare industry has cottoned onto the IoT with a range of devices entering the market, designed to improve the lives of patients and healthcare practitioners, writes ANDRE DEETLEFS, Executive: Lines of Business & Enterprise, The Jasco Group.

The Internet of Things is evolving quickly, and on a global scale. The healthcare industry has cottoned on to this trend and already we are seeing a host of applications and connected devices entering the market, bearing the promise of improving the lives of patients and healthcare practitioners alike. The benefits of IoT extend well beyond health and fitness monitoring, however, and can help to smooth the interaction process between healthcare and medical aid providers as well as their clients.

The impact of IoT on healthcare

From a healthcare monitoring perspective, the introduction of a variety of connected wearable devices, sensors and health applications have emerged to track a variety of common health concerns. People now have access to a multitude of health-related data from heart rates and fitness levels, to blood pressure, sleep patterns, insulin levels and even the dispensing of medication. These devices – both wearable and in the form of smart phone applications – use the Internet to communicate data back to medical aids and healthcare providers. The steady flow of information keeps them apprised of the health state of the wearer, or user, and helps them to avert worsened conditions.

Healthcare providers and medical aids are finding a wealth of value through the incoming stream of data from these devices. Leveraging the likes of Artificial Intelligence (AI) and Machine Learning (ML), they are able to do more with this data than ever before. Data analysis helps them to track trends and identify common problems, risks and solutions, which enables them to make greater medicinal strides. Many incurable disorders can now be managed easily and in an automated fashion, freeing up doctors’ time for research, and providing patients with better quality of life.

IoT is also helping healthcare providers and medical aids in other areas such as in-hospital vital sign monitoring, inventory and asset tracking and logistics. A key area that remains largely unexplored however, is the benefit of IoT on healthcare contact centres.

IoT improves CX

Customer experience (CX) is lauded as the new mark of customer loyalty. In the digital age, where most services are available at the click of a button, customers move swiftly between service providers when their experience with a provider is less than satisfactory. The same is true of healthcare and medical aid providers.

Many people still experience the frustration of repeatedly providing details to representatives of healthcare or medical aid providers. Time and again customers are prompted for the same information, having to fill in the same forms or needing to confirm the same details with a contact centre agent. A few medical aids and healthcare practitioners, as well as third party organisations however, are discovering that they can tap into the data being generated by connected devices and sensors to auto-complete their customer profiles. By having all their customers’ relevant information centrally stored and on-hand when customers contact them. They are providing better, faster service to customers while simultaneously accessing  vital and accurate information that they require.

While some healthcare providers and medical aids are using IoT technology themselves to verify the accuracy and completeness of their databases, third party organisations are also emerging with applications that assist customers while providing an accessible database to healthcare and insurance providers. This must however be approved by the customer. The likes of Logbox have recently been brought to light in South Africa; an application which collates a person’s medical history and personal information on a secure platform and allows them to share it with doctors, hospitals and medical aid providers. This process helps  save time, while giving providers ease of access to customer information. Connected devices which tie into applications such as Logbox can ensure that data collection is both accurate and automatic.

IoT to prevent fraud

A common issue experienced by both healthcare providers and medical aids, is the incorrect relay of information by customers. For example, a person applying for medical aid may state that they are healthy when in fact they may have a pre-existing medical condition. A sensor or connected device would be able to easily counter such claims, providing the contact centre agent with accurate information on the state of the person’s health, depending on the type of mechanism.

In the event of medical aid claims, IoT devices can also prevent fraud by verifying the authenticity of the individual’s claim. Medical aid contact centre agents would easily be able to access the claimant’s accurate medical history and records, through automated data delivery, and validate the necessity of the procedure.

Fraud from healthcare providers is also a lurking problem. Greedy practitioners may recommend more expensive medication, or unnecessary procedures anticipating higher returns. An analysis of data supplied by an IoT enabled device could easily refute the need for any recommended procedure and may even be able to suggest a more suitable solution, with the ongoing application of AI and ML.

IoT for healthcare

IoT, and more specifically the data it generates, opens the door to a world of possibilities for the healthcare industry. Whether applied to improve lives and control health disorders, or used to track and trace hospital assets; perhaps to administer medication, or facilitate smoother interactions between healthcare providers and customers; or possibly to prevent fraudulent activity, one thing is certain: IoT benefits the entire healthcare value chain and. If not already in use, IoT should form part of any healthcare and medical aid provider’s digital strategy.

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Win a Poster Heater with Gadget and Takealot.com

This winter Gadget and Takealot.com are giving away three Poster Heaters, which look like posters but become heaters when you plug them in.

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Three Gadget readers will each win a unit, valued at R550 each. To enter, follow @GadgetZA and @Takealot on Twitter and tell us on the @GadgetZA account how many Watts the heater consumes.

What’s the big deal about these heaters? Many of us are struggling to keep the balance between soaring electricity costs and the need to keep warm this winter.

However, the recently launched Poster Heater by EasyHeat and distributed in South Africa by Takealot.com is not only one of the most cost effective electric heaters currently on the market, it is also easy to setup and use.

As the name indicates, it is a poster similar to one you would hang on a wall. But, plug it in and it turns into a 300 Watt heater. The Poster Heater isn’t designed to heat hallways or large rooms, but rather smaller ones like a bedroom or a baby’s nursery or a dressing room.

It uses radiant heating, which means that it heats up in a couple of minutes and the heat is directed at the objects or people around it, quickly taking the chill out of the air and providing a comfortable ambient temperature.

The other advantage of radiant heating is that it doesn’t dry out the air like infrared or gas heaters. Users also don’t have to worry about their children or pets getting too close to it because, even though it gets hot, it can be touched.

To enter the competition follow the steps below:

Competition entry details:

1. Follow @GadgetZA and @Takealot on Twitter. (We will ONLY be accepting entries via Twitter, so please don’t enter through the comments section of this article.)

2. Tell us on Twitter, via @GadgetZA, mentioning @Takealot in your posting, how many Watts the Poster Heater consumes.

cleardot.gif3. The competition closes on 31 July 2018.

4. Winners will be notified via Twitter on 1 August and Takealot.com will be in touch to organise delivery.

5. The competition is only open to South African residents.

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Happy Emoji Day! Here’s 10 reasons to be cheerful

First created by Shigetaka Kurita in 1999, the emoji has become a huge part of everyday communication. Whether you love them or hate them, flying dollar bills, applauding hands and rolling eyes are here to stay.

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Scientist suggest that the use of emojis will help us gain the same satisfaction from digital interactions as we enjoy from personal contact.

Almost two decades later, and we have over 2600 unique emojis to perfectly express what we feel, thank you Mr Kurita! Join HMD, the home of Nokia phones as we celebrate World Emoji Day on the 17th of July with these interesting emoji facts:

The most popular emoji used is “Person Shrugging”

1.       The Nokia 3310 was chosen as one of the first 3 “National” emojis for Finland… it represents unbreakable!

2.       South Africa’s favourite emoji is the “Kiss and wink”… how sweet SA!

3.       French is the only language where a ‘smiley’ does not top the list for its use

4.       On average, over 60 billion emojis are sent on Facebook every day

5.       For the first time ever, the Oxford Dictionaries Word of the Year was a pictograph! The “Face with Tears of Joy” was crowned word of the year in 2015

6.       According to Emojipedia, some of the most requested emoji’s include afro, a bagel and hands making a heart

7.       To include all races, a diversity pack was released in 2017

8.       It has become so trendy that the Museum of Modern Art displays the original emoji collection on canvas

9.       In 2009, Herman Melville’s classic Moby Dick was completely translated into emoji’s

 

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