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How do FreeMe deals compare?

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Tariffic, a cellphone spend optimisation company has crunched the numbers on Telkom’s new FreeMe packages, and have completed an analysis of how it competes with other mobile operators now that these packages have been released.

Are you interested to see if you’d save on Telkom’s brand new, much talked about, FreeMe packages?

Telkom has put its PR and marketing machines in full gear with their FreeMe packages.  And these packages have certainly piqued the interest of South African consumers.  But, how do they really compare to some of the other offerings available in the market? Tariffic, a cellphone spend optimisation company, has used its web-based contract optimisation tool to crunch the numbers and find out exactly how competitive these new packages are.

Tariffic analysed the cellular behaviour of 3 different user-profiles to calculate the cheapest SIM-only contract for each type of cellphone user, across all major mobile network operators in South Africa.

The results of this analysis are very positive for Telkom, and show that Telkom’s FreeMe packages are the top recommended and cheapest package for all three of the user profiles analysed.  Antony Seeff, Tariffic’s CEO, said “the FreeMe packages are dominating the market, saving these users an average of 24% a month compared to the next best option.”  These results show that FreeMe is competing directly with MTN’s My MTNChoice+ packages, Cell C’s ChatMore and Pinnacle packages, and Vodacom’s SmartMore Data deals. It is interesting to note that in all 3 examples, Cell C and MTN offered the next best deals, at similar price points (in 2/3 situations), which was followed in every case by Vodacom, whose SmartMore package were consistently significantly more expensive than the others.

However, Seeff cautions that South African consumers should not be following these recommendations blindly.  “You are not User A, B, or C – you are unique and you use your cellphone in a unique way, and that’s why you should find the right packages for you.”   Seeff recommends that consumers carefully consider which package is right for them based on their exact requirements.  “This can be done by carefully interrogating the packages available, together with your specific needs; or by using Tariffic’s online tool, available for free at http://www.tariffic.com”, said Seeff.

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To find your best FreeMe package, simply follow the steps below:

  • Head over to https://www.tariffic.com/me
  • Click on “Get started now”.
  • All 4 networks are selected by default. If you don’t want to see recommendations for other networks, then simply click on their logos to deselect them. Click “Next Step”.
  • Select which handsets you would like to see deals for.  The most popular handsets, as well as SIM-only deals are already selected, but you can add or remove from this list based on your desires.  Click “Next Step” when you’re done.
  • If you have your cellphone bills available, and would like to find the perfect contracts based on your exact usage, then click Option 2 and upload your cellphone bills (invoices and itemised bills) on the next screen.  If you don’t have the bills, you can click Option 1 to estimate your usage.
  • You will then be shown a list of the most optimal packages for you, based on the networks you’re interested in, the phones you’ve selected, and your exact usage requirements.

And that’s it!  You’ll be able to see not only what the most suitable packages are for you, but also what bundles to add, and how much you’ll be expected to spend every month.

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Samsung unfolds the future

At the #Unpacked launch, Samsung delivered the world’s first foldable phone from a major brand. ARTHUR GOLDSTUCK tried it out.

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Everything that could be known about the new Samsung Galaxy S10 range, launched on Wednesday in San Francisco, seems to have been known before the event.

Most predictions were spot-on, including those in Gadget (see our preview here), thanks to a series of leaks so large, they competed with the hole an iceberg made in the Titanic.

The big surprise was that there was a big surprise. While it was widely expected that Samsung would announce a foldable phone, few predicted what would emerge from that announcement. About the only thing that was guessed right was the name: Galaxy Fold.

The real surprise was the versatility of the foldable phone, and the fact that units were available at the launch. During the Johannesburg event, at which the San Francisco launch was streamed live, small groups of media took turns to enter a private Fold viewing area where photos were banned, personal phones had to be handed in, and the Fold could be tried out under close supervision.

The first impression is of a compact smartphone with a relatively small screen on the front – it measures 4.6-inches – and a second layer of phone at the back. With a click of a button, the phone folds out to reveal a 7.3-inch inside screen – the equivalent of a mini tablet.

The fold itself is based on a sophisticated hinge design that probably took more engineering than the foldable display. The result is a large screen with no visible seam.

The device introduces the concept of “app continuity”, which means an app can be opened on the front and, in mid-use, if the handset is folded open, continue on the inside from where the user left off on the front. The difference is that the app will the have far more space for viewing or other activity.

Click here to read about the app experience on the inside of the Fold.

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Password managers don’t protect you from hackers

Using a password manager to protect yourself online? Research reveals serious weaknesses…

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Top password manager products have fundamental flaws that expose the data they are designed to protect, rendering them no more secure than saving passwords in a text file, according to a new study by researchers at Independent Security Evaluators (ISE).

“100 percent of the products that ISE analyzed failed to provide the security to safeguard a user’s passwords as advertised,” says ISE CEO Stephen Bono. “Although password managers provide some utility for storing login/passwords and limit password reuse, these applications are a vulnerable target for the mass collection of this data through malicious hacking campaigns.”

In the new report titled “Under the Hood of Secrets Management,” ISE researchers revealed serious weaknesses with top password managers: 1Password, Dashlane, KeePass and LastPass.  ISE examined the underlying functionality of these products on Windows 10 to understand how users’ secrets are stored even when the password manager is locked. More than 60 million individuals 93,000 businesses worldwide rely on password managers. Click here for a copy of the report.

Password managers are marketed as a solution to eliminate the security risks of storing passwords or secrets for applications and browsers in plain text documents. Having previously examined these and other password managers, ISE researchers expected an improved level of security standards preventing malicious credential extraction. Instead ISE found just the opposite. 

Click here to read the findings from the report.

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