Connect with us

Featured

From 77D to 800D, Canon extends DSLR journey

Published

on

Canon has introduced two new DSLR cameras to the EOS family: the EOS 77D and EOS 800D. The former being aimed at the up-and-coming DSLR photographer while the latter being for the professional.

The EOS 77D offers high-end performance and full control and is ideal for those looking to upgrade their kit and refine their skills, while the EOS 800D is great way to start the DSLR journey.

Alongside the cameras, Canon has introduced the EF-S 18-55mm f/4-5.6 IS STM – the smallest non-retractable DSLR kit lens of its focal range – as well as the Remote Controller BR-E1, designed for remote capture with no line of sight up to 5m away.

Canon provided the following information:

With the same sensor technology found in the iconic EOS 80D and Canon’s latest processor – DIGIC 7 – both cameras capture scenes in impressive quality, with richer detail, while being fast enough to ensure a crystal clear image. Boasting the world’s fastest auto focus using Live View mode at an astonishing 0.03 seconds, the cameras deliver pin-sharp precision, and with the ability to shoot at six frames a second fast moving subjects are captured with ease.

For low light shots from sunrise to sunset, the cameras let you shoot up to ISO 25,600 – extendable to 51,200 – and capture every scene without struggle. For some shots, detail is everything, and with 45 cross-type AF points the cameras focus quickly, track moving objects accurately, and capturing razor sharp images. Both cameras also include

7560-pixel RGB+IR metering to detect fine details such as skin tone and offer accurate exposure.

Take a bite out of Hollywood

You can capture an exceptional level of detail and smooth motion in movies as well as stills, catching fast moving subjects in Full HD 60p and HDR Movie Shooting. Whether it’s safari, sport or sunny scenes on the beach, Dual Pixel CMOS AF tracks subjects as they move, focusing smoothly for professional-looking results. For shooting movies on the go 5-axis digital image stabilizer irons out camera movements when shooting hand-held movies.

To help make the camera your own, the EOS 77D is offers full control, with dual control wheels to adjust settings like aperture and shutter speed, and top panel LCD to help you see every setting. For less seasoned photographers, the EOS 800D’s guided interface teaches you how camera settings work as you shoot, transforming your photography and helping you grow in skill.

Shoot, connect, share

NFC and Wi-Fi lets you simply share images and movies to compatible smart devices or a Canon Connect Station before editing and sharing with the world. For a constant connection, Bluetooth® lets you turn on and browse photos without having to take the camera from your bag, or operate it remotely via a smart device or the new Remote Controller BR-E1.

Extend your photography range

The new EF-S 18-55mm f/4-5.6 IS STM kit lens is an ideal lens to get started with and complements an all-rounder DSLR with the capability to shoot a wide range of pictures, from landscape to portraits. The smallesti in its class, the lens is packed with a 4-stop Image Stabilizer for steady low-light or full zoom shots, 7 blade circular aperture for pleasing background blur in portraits. For video scenes Servo AF with near-silent STM is perfect for focusing without distracting noise.

Featured

CES: Most useless gadgets of all

Choosing the best of show is a popular pastime, but the worst gadgets of CES also deserve their moment of infamy, writes ARTHUR GOLDSTUCK.

Published

on

It’s fairly easy to choose the best new gadgets launched at the Consumer Electronics Show (CES) in Las Vegas last week. Most lists – and there are many – highlight the LG roll-up TV, the Samsung modular TV, the Royole foldable phone, the impossible burger, and the walking car.

But what about the voice assisted bed, the smart baby dining table, the self-driving suitcase and the robot that does nothing? In their current renditions, they sum up what is not only bad about technology, but how technology for its own sake quickly leads us down the rabbit hole of waste and futility.

The following pick of the worst of CES may well be a thinly veneered attempt at mockery, but it is also intended as a caution against getting caught up in hype and justification of pointless technology.

1. DUX voice-assisted bed

The single most useless product launched at CES this year must surely be a bed with Alexa voice control built in. No, not to control the bed itself, but to manage the smart home features with which Alexa and other smart speakers are associated. Or that any smartphone with Siri or Google Assistant could handle. Swedish luxury bedmaker DUX thinks it’s a good idea to manage smart lights, TV, security and air conditioning through the bed itself. Just don’t say Alexa’s “wake word” in your sleep.

2. Smart Baby Dining Table 

Ironically, the runner-up comes from a brand that also makes smart beds: China’s 37 Degree Smart Home. Self-described as “the world’s first smart furniture brand that is transforming technology into furniture”, it outdid itself with a Smart Baby Dining Table. This isa baby feeding table with a removable dining chair that contains a weight detector and adjustable camera, to make children’s weight and temperature visible to parents via the brand’s app. Score one for hands-off parenting.

Click here to read about smart diapers, self-driving suitcases, laundry folders, and bad robot companions.

Previous Page1 of 3

Continue Reading

Featured

CES: Tech means no more “lost in translation”

Published

on

Talking to strangers in foreign countries just got a lot easier with recent advancements in translation technology. Last week, major companies and small startups alike showed the CES technology expo in Las Vegas how well their translation worked at live translation.

Most existing translation apps, like Bixby and Siri Translate, are still in their infancy with live speech translation, which brings about the need for dedicated solutions like these technologies:

Babel’s AIcorrect pocket translator

AI_star_from_China_AIcorrect-b83fb388c6b7a636ec02f5a66bb403cd.jpg

The AIcorrect Translator, developed by Beijing-based Babel Technology, attracted attention as the linguistic king of the show. As an advanced application of AI technology in consumer technology, the pocket translator deals with problems in cross-linguistic communication. 

It supports real-time mutual translation in multiple situations between Chinese/English and 30 other languages, including Japanese, Korean, Thai, French, Russian and Spanish. A significant differentiator is that major languages like English being further divided into accents. The translation quality reaches as high as 96%.

It has a touch screen, where transcription and audio translation are shown at the same time. Lei Guan, CEO of Babel Technology, said: “As a Chinese pathfinder in the field of AI, we designed the device in hoping that hundreds of millions of people can have access to it and carry out cross-linguistic communication all barrier-free.” 

Click here to read about the Pilot, Travis, Pocketalk, Google and Zoi translators.

Previous Page1 of 6

Continue Reading

Trending

Copyright © 2018 World Wide Worx