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Don’t write Generation Z’s ideas in chalk

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Generation Zs are the driving force behind the adoption digital information, as visual learning allows us to retain information better, writes AVESH SUBBIAH, Product Manager: Voice & Infrastructure at Nashua.

You’ve heard it before: bookstores are shrinking; magazine sales are plummeting. E-readers and video are more prolific and accessible than ice in the freezer. The important question is, why? It’s not as simple as ‘digital is everything’. There’s a second element at play that’s at the core of the unthinkably rapid digital movement: people absorb information better as multimedia.

Generation Zs are the driving force behind the adoption of information beyond the physical page. It seems they’re onto something: studies confirm that learning in visuals allows us to retain information better.

Not only is the information retained better, it’s absorbed quicker in the first place. Experts predict the human eye can register up to 36 000 visual messages in just an hour, and that visuals are processed sixty times faster in the brain than text.

#NewSchool

So while doomsday preppers criticise the reduction in paper and adoption of visual information processing, Generation Zs are likely learning quicker and more effectively than generations before them. In light of this trend, it makes sense that classrooms and learning environments are being reimagined to facilitate visual learning.

It’s not only individual device-driven learning that’s taking over – it’s the reinvention of communal learning equipment too. Digital, interactive whiteboards are the new kid in the classroom, being rolled out by schools looking to future-proof their learning environments.

Keep ‘em engaged

These interactive devices are the educational solution to the most commonly asked question by school management: how do we relate to Generation Z and keep them actively interested in what they’re learning? Luckily for those having to play catch-up quickly, digital whiteboards were made to keep learners engaged.

The combined sound, video and text formats possible when teaching with interactive whiteboards is a unique cocktail of multimedia that enhances cognitive stimulation. Studies reflect the use of visuals can improve learning by up to 400%.

What’s critical to the success of digital whiteboards is also the ability to collaborate on work whilst it’s being taught – information can be edited and shared instantly, and ideas saved at the touch of a button. Thoughts, lists and inspiration aren’t erased, they’re safely stored.

Which means open season for the free-flow of ideas – the ideal tool for learners who, by the very nature of their environment having grown up in the 2000s, think laterally.

Learn to work

This also means preparing learners properly for their entry (one day) to the workplace which will be an entirely different experience by the time they get there. Contemporary workspaces are being equipped with digital whiteboards because corporate leadership also need to foist themselves into the hearts and minds of their next influx of employees: Generation Zs. When it comes to learning environments, digital innovation doesn’t mean a classroom of robotic learners with their noses stuck to iPads.

It can mean a creative hub, where learners speak up and feel confident to share ideas, and improve their own performance in an increasingly competitive space by retaining more of what they’re learning. Digital whiteboards are the first of many learning innovations that can and will improve and grow the minds of tomorrow.

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Samsung unfolds the future

At the #Unpacked launch, Samsung delivered the world’s first foldable phone from a major brand. ARTHUR GOLDSTUCK tried it out.

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Everything that could be known about the new Samsung Galaxy S10 range, launched on Wednesday in San Francisco, seems to have been known before the event.

Most predictions were spot-on, including those in Gadget (see our preview here), thanks to a series of leaks so large, they competed with the hole an iceberg made in the Titanic.

The big surprise was that there was a big surprise. While it was widely expected that Samsung would announce a foldable phone, few predicted what would emerge from that announcement. About the only thing that was guessed right was the name: Galaxy Fold.

The real surprise was the versatility of the foldable phone, and the fact that units were available at the launch. During the Johannesburg event, at which the San Francisco launch was streamed live, small groups of media took turns to enter a private Fold viewing area where photos were banned, personal phones had to be handed in, and the Fold could be tried out under close supervision.

The first impression is of a compact smartphone with a relatively small screen on the front – it measures 4.6-inches – and a second layer of phone at the back. With a click of a button, the phone folds out to reveal a 7.3-inch inside screen – the equivalent of a mini tablet.

The fold itself is based on a sophisticated hinge design that probably took more engineering than the foldable display. The result is a large screen with no visible seam.

The device introduces the concept of “app continuity”, which means an app can be opened on the front and, in mid-use, if the handset is folded open, continue on the inside from where the user left off on the front. The difference is that the app will the have far more space for viewing or other activity.

Click here to read about the app experience on the inside of the Fold.

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Password managers don’t protect you from hackers

Using a password manager to protect yourself online? Research reveals serious weaknesses…

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Top password manager products have fundamental flaws that expose the data they are designed to protect, rendering them no more secure than saving passwords in a text file, according to a new study by researchers at Independent Security Evaluators (ISE).

“100 percent of the products that ISE analyzed failed to provide the security to safeguard a user’s passwords as advertised,” says ISE CEO Stephen Bono. “Although password managers provide some utility for storing login/passwords and limit password reuse, these applications are a vulnerable target for the mass collection of this data through malicious hacking campaigns.”

In the new report titled “Under the Hood of Secrets Management,” ISE researchers revealed serious weaknesses with top password managers: 1Password, Dashlane, KeePass and LastPass.  ISE examined the underlying functionality of these products on Windows 10 to understand how users’ secrets are stored even when the password manager is locked. More than 60 million individuals 93,000 businesses worldwide rely on password managers. Click here for a copy of the report.

Password managers are marketed as a solution to eliminate the security risks of storing passwords or secrets for applications and browsers in plain text documents. Having previously examined these and other password managers, ISE researchers expected an improved level of security standards preventing malicious credential extraction. Instead ISE found just the opposite. 

Click here to read the findings from the report.

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