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Deal with disruption in workplace of tomorrow

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Decision-makers need to carefully scrutinise their employee value positions, workflow and supporting technology systems and consider how they will meet the demands of the workplace of the future in 2016 and beyond.

Gys Kappers, CEO of Wyzetalk, believes that the biggest challenges in the coming years will need clear strategies on these three key areas: employee engagement, data and mobility.

Data driven insight

We talk a lot about big data and the opportunity to know your customer, but we’re still far off making it really work for us. Some of the challenges arise from the heavy duty software systems at play from big vendors. They have the data but not the workflow and flexibility to make the system or data easy to work with. “Many are now considering the open ecosystem and allowing third-party developers to create overlay apps and micro-systems to plug into their systems. This ‘integration’ creates systems that are easy to use, inherently mobile and focused in their user application.”

“The always-on workforce needs to be able to access and input data in these systems, and most would prefer using a mobile apps or some kind of mobile menu to do this. Mobile is ideal to optimise workflow and employee services, resulting in things like self-drive payslips, leave applications, order processing,” says Kappers, “We’re going to see a lot more happen in this space, think of mobile intranets that connect companies with employees in a dynamic way to increase productivity not to mention create an immediate channel for direct feedback, both ways.

The importance of social

Increasingly, Kappers says, there is also the need for more functional and relevant business apps that incorporate a social layer. “To enable collaboration, ideation, and knowledge sharing amongst users. More groups of people are taking to apps that provide functionality relevant to their style, content, and context of work. Company policies will need to accommodate these in their technology and security stacks.”

“Despite the potential, the biggest challenge facing any organisation is to align its technology approach and content services to meet the needs of both the company and the end user. Companies should look beyond broadcast mode when defining their comms strategies. Blending this in order for all stakeholders to enjoy a mutually respectful and engaged environment is fundamentally shifting how a business needs to plan and develop its systems,” adds Kappers.

Think different

Despite the opportunities, Kappers says many companies are approaching technology and the changing workplace dynamics with an old mindset. “More than ever the need for good change management capabilities is certain. Organisational disruption needn’t be a chaotic it should be carefully considered and implemented with expert support.”

With this, comes the rise of the individual in the workplace. Companies should ask how they get more from their employees by understanding their individual needs and engaging with them.

“Often companies will say that their employees are important to them, but they behave in a way contrary to that. One of the problems is that the role of human resources continues to be seen as transactional and not strategic. Too often, companies see people as a way to meet the bottom line. The thinking needs to change and decision-makers should view employees as assets to the business. You treat assets very differently,” says Kappers.

Stimulating education

For Henry Chandler, VP and COO of the African Society for Talent Development, this talent-driven business environment means the importance of learning and development has become greater than ever.

“South African firms have to focus on talent engagement, high performance, and efficiency, while building capacity for local, regional, and global growth. Despite the fact that South African firms are facing tough times at home, they are increasingly taking advantage of opportunities in sub-Saharan Africa.”

Success in this market requires leaders with the skills to build a high performance culture, pointing to how investing in the holistic advancement of talent should be a business imperative.

“Such a focus must aim to build a sustainable and adaptive organisation of talented, diverse, competent, and inspired people. Many executives are becoming directly involved in global leadership development programmes related to increased employee engagement and overall business performance,” says Chandler.

New environment, new approach

As a result, organisations require managers who can work in complex, multi-cultural situations. This means that leaders should be able to manage the balance between delivering for today and investing for tomorrow. Says Chandler: “High value should be placed on leadership development offering programmes aimed at developing the skills and knowledge of managers and leaders at different stages of their careers. Engaged, skilled and inspired people are at the centre of delivering on the growth aspirations of organisations.”

Sourcing talent

“The internet has revolutionised the way people learn about companies and apply for jobs. Company career sites remain the top channel for promoting the brand. But talent acquisition and recruiting are undergoing rapid changes, challenging companies to leverage social networks and other collaboration tools. Social media provides not only information about a candidate’s experience and skills, but a better glimpse into their lifestyle, values, and their cultural fit,” adds Chandler.

As the economy continues to grow, employee skills are becoming more specialised, making engagement and culture, leadership and development top priorities for talent management stakeholders. The culture of the organisation should support high performance and talent engagement.

“Employers who fail to engage with workers and provide solutions to the increasing demands being placed on workforces today will struggle to stay abreast of the competition tomorrow,” concludes Chandler.

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Bring your network with you

At last week’s Critical Communications World, Motorola unveiled the LXN 500 LTE Ultra Portable Network Infrastructure. It allows rescue personal to set up dedicated LTE networks for communication in an emergency, writes SEAN BACHER.

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In the event of an emergency, communications are absolutely critical, but the availability of public phone networks are limited due to weather conditions or congestion.

Motorola realised that this caused a problem when trying to get rescue personnel to those in need and so developed its LXN 500 LTE Ultra Portable Network Infrastructure. The product is the smallest and lightest full powered broadband network to date and allows the first person on the scene to set up an LTE network in a matter of minutes, allowing other rescue team members to communicate with each other.

“The LXN 500 weighs six kilograms and comes in a backpack with two batteries. It offers a range of 1km and allows up to 100 connections at the same time. However, in many situations the disaster area may span more than 1km which is why they can be connected to each other in a mesh formation,” says Tunde Williams, Head of Field and Solutions Marketing EMEA, Motorola Solutions.

The LXN 500 solution offers communication through two-way radios, and includes mapping, messaging, push-to-talk, video and imaging features onboard, thus eliminating the need for any additional hardware.

Data collected on the device can then be sent through to a central control room where an operator can deploy additional rescue personnel where needed. Once video is streamed into the control room, realtime analytics and augmented reality can be applied to it to help predict where future problem points may arise. Video images and other multimedia can also be made available for rescuers on the ground.

“Although the LXN 500 was designed for the seamless communications between on ground rescue teams and their respective control rooms, it has made its way into the police force and in places where there is little or no cellular signal such as oil rigs,” says Williams.

He gave a hostage scenario: “In the event of a hostage situation, it is important for the police to relay information in realtime to ensure no one is hurt. However the perpetrators often use their mobile phones to try and foil any rescue attempts. Should the police have the correct partnerships in place they are able to disable cellular towers in the vicinity, preventing any in or outgoing calls on a public network and allowing the police get their job done quickly and more effectively.”

By disabling any public networks in the area, police are also able to eliminate any cellular detonated bombs from going off but still stay in touch with each other he says.

The LXN 500 offers a wide range of mission critical cases and is sure to transform communications and improve safety for first responders and the people they are trying to protect.

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Kaspersky moves to Switzerland

As part of its Global Transparency Initiative, Kaspersky Lab is adapting its infrastructure to move a number of core processes from Russia to Switzerland.

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This includes customer data storage and processing for most regions, as well as software assembly, including threat detection updates. To ensure full transparency and integrity, Kaspersky Lab is arranging for this activity to be supervised by an independent third party, also based in Switzerland.

Global transparency and collaboration for an ultra-connected world

The Global Transparency Initiative, announced in October 2017, reflects Kaspersky Lab’s ongoing commitment to assuring the integrity and trustworthiness of its products. The new measures are the next steps in the development of the initiative, but they also reflect the company’s commitment to working with others to address the growing challenges of industry fragmentation and a breakdown of trust. Trust is essential in cybersecurity, and Kaspersky Lab understands that trust is not a given; it must be repeatedly earned through transparency and accountability.

The new measures comprise the move of data storage and processing for a number of regions, the relocation of software assembly and the opening of the first Transparency Center.

Relocation of customer data storage and processing

By the end of 2019, Kaspersky Lab will have established a data center in Zurich and in this facility, will store and process all information for users in Europe, North America, Singapore, Australia, Japan and South Korea, with more countries to follow. This information is shared voluntarily by users with the Kaspersky Security Network (KSN) an advanced, cloud-based system that automatically processes cyberthreat-related data.

Relocation of software assembly

Kaspersky Lab will relocate to Zurich its ‘software build conveyer’ — a set of programming tools used to assemble ready to use software out of source code. Before the end of 2018, Kaspersky Lab products and threat detection rule databases (AV databases) will start to be assembled and signed with a digital signature in Switzerland, before being distributed to the endpoints of customers worldwide. The relocation will ensure that all newly assembled software can be verified by an independent organisation and show that software builds and updates received by customers match the source code provided for audit.

Establishment of the first Transparency Center

The source code of Kaspersky Lab products and software updates will be available for review by responsible stakeholders in a dedicated Transparency Center that will also be hosted in Switzerland and is expected to open this year. This approach will further show that generation after generation of Kaspersky Lab products were built and used for one purpose only: protecting the company’s customers from cyberthreats.

Independent supervision and review

Kaspersky Lab is arranging for the data storage and processing, software assembly, and source code to be independently supervised by a third party qualified to conduct technical software reviews. Since transparency and trust are becoming universal requirements across the cybersecurity industry, Kaspersky Lab supports the creation of a new, non-profit organisation to take on this responsibility, not just for the company, but for other partners and members who wish to join.

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