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AI slashes treatment time

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ANESHAN RAMALOO, Senior Business Solutions Manager at SAS, looks into how 2018 will see how technology trends will shape developments through the year.

It used to take months to be able to say whether a particular treatment for cancer was working – wasting precious time which might otherwise have been used to save a patient’s life. Now using analytics, we can predict that treatment’s effectiveness within days.

When addressing the question of what to expect in the tech space in 2018, there is no limit. AI is already doing things we never before would have dreamed possible. From writing music to creating videos, we are achieving milestones which we previously would have considered strictly human.

And yes, it is even helping to save lives.

One of the major forces driving the world of tech and AI is the increasing volume and availability of data. Think of devices like the Fitbit, which provides a wealth of data concerning your health, such as heart rate and sleeping patterns.

At the same time, we’ve developed technology that allows us to analyse more data than ever before. And thanks to a massive improvement in compute power, analytical solutions can now analyse these massive volumes of data at blistering speed. Data scientists can develop machine learning models in minutes, which can enable businesses to deliver results quickly.

A great example of the technology that allows this is SAS VIYA, which is an end-to-end analytical platform. The platform fuels the analytics life cycle from data preparation to model development and finally deployment. This is all done in a single interface

One feature of the SAS platform that I’m particularly excited about is the ability to analyse images. This capability is already helping when it comes to wildlife conservation. In the past game rangers had to manually take pictures of particular species of animals and tag them. While this wasn’t part of their core focus, it absorbed a great deal of time. But using SAS’s new technology they can simply take the picture and allow the AI to classify, not only the species of the animal, but other helpful traits such as the sex as well. At the end of the day this frees up the rangers to tackle more important tasks.

More accurate predictions

While the algorithms used in machine learning have been relatively unchanged for decades, we are now seeing the emergence of new algorithms, such as extreme gradient boosting, which have proven to be very successful in data mining competitions like Kaggle. Extreme gradient boosting is a significant development in analytics because it generalises well, enabling more accurate predictions.

While we’ve been drawing on structured data sources like transactional data for some time, no-one has really been tapping into unstructured data sources. For example, customer complaints, reviews and other text data sources.

But these two sources when combined together can be extremely powerful. Say, for instance, you wanted to develop a customer churn prediction model. By including data sources like customer complaints, as opposed to just structured and traditional data sources, you can develop a model that is more accurate at predicting churn.

Deep learning has created a lot of hype, and for good reason.

It is a type of machine learning, based on a set of algorithms that model high-level abstractions in data, by using multiple processing layers with complex structures.Instead of organising data to run through predefined equations, deep learning sets up basic parameters about the data and trains the computer to learn on its own by recognising patterns using many layers of processing. This means it can train computers to perform human-like tasks, such as recognising speech, identifying images or making predictions.

Deep learning is already being used to make significant inroads into areas such as image recognition, fraud detection and the highly regulated credit risk modelling. In fact, SAS is currently working with credit bureau, Equifax, using deep learning techniques in credit risk modelling. The results are promising as the accuracy of the models has improved traditional techniques.

Bots that understand emotion

Another exciting space in AI is bot technology. Chatbots are programmes that use natural language processing and AI to create conversations between machines and humans.

Instead of having a human respond to complaints or queries, this can now be done by a chatbot to save time and money on mundane and repetitive tasks. For example, responses to queries on bank accounts. Some banks are using bots to advise customers on financial advice and investments.

Until now, AI has generally been designed to do specific things like fraud detection. The human ability to perform tasks has always been greater than machines as we can generalise and perform a much wider set of functions.

But incredibly we’re starting to see AI train itself to learn.

In 2016 Google created a programme called AlphaGo. It was capable of beating even the most skilled human players at the ancient Chinese strategy game, Go – considered to be one of the most complicated games on earth.

But this was taken a step further through the creation of AlphaGo Zero, a programme provided with a very limited amount of training data. The idea was that it would learn by playing against itself. Over a period of time, AlphaGo Zero beat AlphaGo.

Essentially it had taught itself to think.

On the threshold of a future in which machines can think and learn: as we step into 2018, one could say nothing is impossible.

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As selfie cameras rise, so must selfie etiquette

Selfies were once a sign of narcissism or self-obsession. Now they are the new normal, writes ARTHUR GOLDSTUCK.

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You can blame Oxford Dictionaries for making the “selfie” respectable. After all, being named Word of the Year, as it was in 2013, does tend to soften some of the self-consciousness in this most self-conscious of actions.

Once seen as a symbol of narcissism and self-obsession, it is now the new normal, to the extent that most smartphones are sold on the basis of the front camera. Or, as that feature is now almost universally named by manufacturers, the “selfie camera”.

I was one of the hold-outs, having a near-allergy to the selfie. I still resist, but succumb more often than I would like. The reason for continued resistance is that it remains a big leap from the word becoming respectable to the action itself shedding its narcissistic image. 

For most, it’s already happened, and for that you can blame Ellen DeGeneres. She  choreographed the most famous group selfie yet at the 2014 Oscars, when she roped a bunch of actors into a group selfie, using the then-new Samsung Galaxy S5 smartphone. Her tweet of the photo became what was then the most retweeted posting ever on Twitter, and was estimated to have been worth a million dollars in marketing value to Samsung.

Ironically, it was Samsung’s up-and-coming challenger, Huawei, that came up with a new word for this type of selfie: the “groufie”. Thanks to an 8 Megapixel front camera on the new Huawei Ascend P7 camera that year which took the highest quality selfies – and groufies – possible on a smartphone at the time.

It didn’t end there, and selfies and groufies have morphed into variations like selfscapes (selfie in a landscape), skyfies (selfies from the air, using remote controlled devices) and jerkies (selfies to make an idiot out of yourself). I invented all of those on the fly, so it’s easy to imagine a new word emerging for every type of selfie.

Continue reading about selfie improvements through the years.

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Mickey’s 90th for SA

Disney Africa announced the local launch of the Mickey the True Original campaign, joining the global festivities honouring 9 decades of Mickey Mouse, his heritage, personality and status as a pop-culture icon.

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As 18 November 2018 marks 90 years since his first appearance in Steamboat Willie in November 1928, a series of world-wide celebrations will be taking place this year and South Africa is no different.

The campaign will come to life with engaging content and events that embrace Mickey’s impact on the past, present and future. The local festivities kick off in earnest this month, leading up to Mickey’s 90th anniversary on 18 November 2018 and beyond:

  • An exclusive local design project where ten highly talented South African artists will apply their own inspiration and artistic interpretation on 6-foot Mickey Mouse statues.
  • Once revealed to the public, the statues will form part of the Mickey the True Original South African Exhibition, inspired by Mickey’s status as a ‘true original’ and his global impact on popular culture. The exhibition will travel to 3 cities and delight fans and families alike as they journey with Mickey over the years. Featuring 4 sections highlighting Mickey’s innovation, his evolution, influence on fashion and also pop culture, the exhibition is in collaboration with Samsung and Edgars, and will visit:

o   Sandton City, Centre Court: 28 September – 14 October

o   Gateway Theatre of Shopping, Expo Explore Court: 19 October – 11 November

o   Canal Walk Shopping Centre. Centre Court: 16 November – 26 November

  • Samsung continues their collaboration with Disney as they honour Mickey’s 90th anniversary nationally at all Samsung and Edgars Stores. Entitled Unlocking the Imagination, fans are encouraged to visit these stores, take a selfie with a giant Mickey plush toy using their Samsung Galaxy Note9 and stand a chance to win not only a giant Mickey plush, but also an international family trip. Visit www.Samsung.com for more information
  • Mickey’s 90th Spectacular, a two-hour prime-time special, will be screened on M-Net 101 later this year. The elegant affair will feature star-studded musical performances, moving tributes and never-before-seen short films. Superstars from music, film and television will join the birthday fun for the internationally beloved character.
  • In addition, look out for special programming on Mickey’s birthday (18 November) across Disney Channel (DStv, Channel 303), Disney XD (DStv, Channel 304) and Disney Junior (DStv, Channel 309).
  • In retailers, Edgars will be stocking a complete collection of trendy fashion, accessories and footwear for the whole family, inspired entirely by Mickey Mouse.
  • Mickey will be the central theme of an in-store campaign nationwide this November and December, with brand new products, apparel, toys, as well as titles from Disney Publishing Worldwide, including books, arts & crafts and comics
  • Discovery Vitality and Disney are celebrating healthy, happy families this festive season by offering helpful and exciting tips and tricks on how to eat nutritious, yet delicious, foods, all inspired by Mickey. There’s also a trip to Disneyland Paris up for grabs. Log on to www.discovery.co.za/vitality for information.
  • And much more – check the press for updates

“Binding generations together more than any other animated character, Mickey Mouse is the “True Original” who reminds people of all ages of the benefits of laughter, optimism and hope,” says Christine Service, Senior Vice President and Country Manager of The Walt Disney Company Africa. “With his universal appeal and ability to emotionally connect with generations all over the world, no other character quite occupies a similar space in the hearts and minds of a global fan base and we are thrilled to be sharing these local festivities.”

Mickey’s birthday is celebrated in honour of the release of his first theatrical film, Steamboat Willie, on 18th November 1928, at the Colony Theatre in New York City. Since then, he has starred in more than 100 cartoons and can currently be seen on Disney Channel (DStv, Channel 303) in the Mickey Mouse cartoon series and on Disney Junior (DStv, Channel 309) in Mickey and the Roadster Racers.

South African fans are encouraged to share their Mickey Mouse moments on social media using the hashtag#Mickey90Africa.

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